Press releases

Press releases

  • Professor Anders Nilsson Water Exists as Two Different Liquids 2017-06-28 Scientists at Stockholm University have discovered two phases of liquid water with large differences in structure and density.
  • Sahara greening intensify cyclone activity 2017-06-08 Future climate warming could lead to a re-greening of the southernmost Sahara, with decreased dust emissions and changes in land cover.
  • Three ERC Advanced Grants to Stockholm University 2017-03-24 Frank Wilczek, professor at the Department of Physics and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Johan Rockström, Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre and David Strömberg at the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES). These three professors at Stockholm University will receive prestigious ERC Advanced Grants.
  • Photo: Jana Weiss High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats 2017-02-24 A study from Stockholm University has now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes.
  • Herring gull with thiamine deficiency, Photo: Lennart Balk Thiamine deficiency in wildlife more widespread than previously thought 2017-01-02 Deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in wildlife was previously described as a problem among certain species within relatively limited geographical areas. Now, researchers at ACES, together with colleagues from several other research institutions in Europe and North America, show that thiamine deficiency is far more widespread than previously thought.
  • Amid rapid change, major Arctic study highlights need to prepare for surprises 2016-11-25 The Arctic Resilience Report, published today, is the first comprehensive assessment of ecosystems and societies in the region. It identifies 19 “tipping points” in natural systems that could radically reshape the Arctic in the coming century, and calls for urgent cooperation to build local communities’ resilience and capacity to adapt to rapid and widespread change.
  • Drought-tolerant species thrive despite returning rains in the Sahel 2016-10-19 Following the devastating droughts in the Sahel region south of the Sahara desert, vegetation has now recovered. What surprises the researchers is that although it is now raining more and has become greener, it is particularly the more drought resistant species that thrive. The conclusion is that not only rain but also agriculture and human utilization of trees, bushes and land affect the plants recovering.
  • Illustration av hur ljus omvandlas av galaxen till ALP. Dark matter does not contain certain axion-like particles 2016-04-22 Researches at Stockholm University are getting closer to understanding dark-matter particle models. Observations can rule out some axion-like particles in the quest for the content of dark matter.
  • Klippor och hav. Foto: Catarina Nilsson/Mostphotos Copper gives an answer to the rise of oxygen 2016-04-18 A new study presents evidence that the rise of atmospheric oxygenation did indeed occur 2.4–2.1 billion years ago. It also shows that biological usage of copper became prominent after the so called “Great Oxidation Event”. An international team of researchers has recently published the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
  • Torkkänsliga tusenåriga träd från bergen i Grekland. Indirekta belägg för variationer i neder-börd och torka såsom trädringsserier användes av forskarna för att rekonstruera variationer i relativ vattentillgång på norra halvklotet under tolv århundraden. Foto: Paul J. Krusic. Large variations in precipitation over the past millennium 2016-04-06 According to a new study in Nature, the Northern Hemisphere has experienced considerably larger variations in precipitation during the past twelve centuries than in the twentieth century. Researchers from Sweden, Germany, and Switzerland have found that climate models overestimated the increase in wet and dry extremes as temperatures increased during the twentieth century. The new results will enable us to improve the accuracy of climate models and to better predict future precipitation changes.
  • guppyhane Small brain is good for the immune system – if you are a fish 2016-03-29 A new study shows that guppies with smaller brains have stronger immune responses than guppies with larger brains.
  • New Nordic Centre of Excellence focusing on Arctic mining communities 2016-01-22 A Nordic Centre of Excellence funded by NordForsk will build an interdisciplinary research environment to provide new thinking about sustainable development, especially in the context of Arctic mining. The new centre is led by KTH Royal Institute of Technology in collaboration with Stockholm University and Stockholm Environment Institute.
  • Yanhang Ma och Peter Oleynikov har många modeller av material på sitt kontor. Men inte någon modell av det nya materialet. First material to be woven at nano level 2016-01-22 For the first time, scientists have been able to weave a material at molecular level. The research is led by University of California Berkeley, in cooperation with Stockholm University.
  • Havsbild Ocean toxicity hampered the rapid evolution of complex life 2015-12-04 By examining rocks at the bottom of ancient oceans, an international group of researchers have revealed that arsenic concentrations in the oceans have varied greatly over time. But also that in the very early oceans, arsenic co-varied with the rise of atmospheric oxygen and coincided with the coming and going of global glaciations.
  • Den asiatiska elefanten har de kortaste spermierna i förhållande till sin kroppsstorlek medan husmusen har de längsta . Människo- och elefantspermier är ungefär lika långa, mindre än hälften så långa som husmusens. Foto: Mostphotos. Fighting and Females Determine How Males Make Sperm 2015-11-18 Why do mice have longer sperm than elephants? A new study shows that the size of the female’s reproductive tract holds the key for understanding how males make sperm.
  • Scientists on the way to Petermann glacier 2015-07-20 On July 27, Swedish polar scientists set off to Greenland to meet the icebreaker Oden in Thule. The mission this time is to examine the Petermann Glacier in north-western Greenland.
  • New family of chemical structures can effectively remove CO2 from gas mixtures 2015-07-15 A newly discovered family of chemical structures, published in Nature, could increase the value of biogas and natural gas that contains carbon dioxide.
  • Norris damm Global freshwater consumption crossing its planetary boundary 2015-07-06 Planetary boundaries have been proposed to describe a safe operating space of humanity. Human consumption of freshwater is the used control variable for a freshwater planetary boundary. Research from Stockholm University is now showing that global freshwater consumption has already pushed beyond its boundary. The article is published in Science.
  • Sand-hopper (Gammarus locusta). Photo: Johan Eklöf. High biodiversity gives healthy seagrass beds 2015-05-20 Loss of algal-feeding invertebrates have surprisingly large effects on health of valuable seagrass meadows. These are the new results from a unique set of coordinated experiments.
  • Love Dalen with tusk in Siberia Woolly mammoth genomes mapped 2015-04-27 Before the world's last woolly mammoth took its final breath, the iconic animals had already suffered from a considerable loss of genetic diversity. These findings were made in the first ever publication of the full DNA sequence of the extinct animal by an international team of scientists from Stockholm University, the Swedish Museum of Natural History and Harvard Medical School among others.
  • Rotationskurvans spår över Vintergatan sedd från södra halvklotet. Spårämnena är färgkodade i blått eller rött beroende på deras relativa rörelse i förhållande till solen Den blå glorian illustrerar den mörka materiens fördelning. Foto: Serge Brunier. Evidence for dark matter in the inner Milky Way 2015-02-13 A new study is providing evidence for the presence of dark matter in the innermost part of the Milky Way, including in our own cosmic neighbourhood and the Earth’s location.
  • Four of nine planetary boundaries now crossed 2015-01-16 Four of nine planetary boundaries have now been crossed as a result of human activity, says an international team of 18 researchers with representatives from Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University in the journal Science, published 16 January. Crossing the boundaries could have serious consequences, both in the present and the future.
  • Two – three times higher levels of brominated flame retardants in toddlers compared to their mothers 2014-12-10 Toddlers are more exposed to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) at home than their mothers, shows a new doctoral thesis from Stockholm University.
  • Using ground-penetrating radar. Photo: Martin Rundkvist. Major Viking Hall Identified in Sweden 2014-12-08 A Viking feasting hall measuring almost 50 metres in length has been identified near Vadstena in Sweden. Archaeologists from Stockholm University and Umeå University used ground-penetrating radar, a non-invasive geophysical method, to locate and map the house foundation.
  • Criminology prize winners pioneers of situational crime prevention 2014-11-05 The work of Ronald V. Clarke and Patricia Mayhew has helped re-shape crime prevention strat-egies world-wide to focus on changing the characteristics of the situations in which crimes repeatedly occur. This was the motivation of the jury when the winners of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology were announced today, November 5.
  • A strong welfare state mitigates the impact of the Great Recession 2014-10-23 There is a general correlation between unemployment and suicide among men. But the weaker the unemployment protection in the country, the stronger the connection. These findings are reported in a comparative study covering thirty countries, focusing the impact of the Great Recession on unemployment and suicide rates. The paper is published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
  • Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals 2014-10-28 Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers’ instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a selection of hand blenders which are available on the Swedish market.
  • University researcher won competition in protein structure prediction 2014-07-18 A research group at SciLifeLab, led by Jens Carlsson at Stockholm University, has won a worldwide competition (GPCR DOCK 2013) to predict the three-dimensional structure of a G protein-coupled receptor using computer modeling. Their results are published in two articles in the scientific journal Structure.
  • Small crustaceans help us assess the effects of pollution and oxygen deficiency in the Baltic sea 2014-06-18 Two of the most pressing environmental problems in the Baltic Sea are pollution and oxygen deficiency. Despite this, our knowledge about how this affects the animals living in the sea is limited. To test the single and combined effects of polluted sediment and oxygen deficiency on benthic organisms small crustaceans (Monoporeia affinis) from the Baltic Sea were studied in experiments. These crustaceans were demonstrated to have a defence mechanism against the cellular damage that changes in water oxygen concentrations can induce. Exposure to polluted sediment was also shown to activate these defence mechanisms.
  • Honorary doctorates 2014 2014-04-15 Stockholm University has now chosen this year’s honorary doctors, all of whom have contributed in distinctive ways to the University's activities in research and education. Prominent names include Eleanor Sharpston, Advocate General at the Court of Justice of the European Union, and the renowned French philosopher Francois Recanati. Within the humanities, in addition to Recanati, recipients of this year’s honorary doctorates include Elaine Aston and Patricia K. Kuhl; in the social sciences: Sandra Wallman and Marie-Laure Djelic; and in the natural sciences: Maria João Ramos, Lynne B. McCusker, Walter Neupert and Thomas Rossby.
  • Poor mimics can succeed as long as they mimic the right trait 2014-04-10 There are both perfect and imperfect mimics in nature. An imperfect mimic might have a different body shape, size or colour pattern arrangement compared to the species it mimics. Researchers have long been puzzled by the way poor mimicry can still be effective in fooling predators not to attack. In the journal Current Biology, researchers from Stockholm University now present a novel solution to the question of imperfect mimicry.
  • Deer droppings good for biodiversity 2014-04-08 By collecting deer droppings, and then growing the seeds found within, researchers from Stockholm University have been able to see how deer spread different types of plants.
  • Stockholm University is the home of outstanding education and research, and a place where open minds meet, discuss and develop Stockholm University School of Business has a new international name – Stockholm Business School 2014-03-14 For the past 15 years, the School of Business has undergone an extensive process of internationalisation which, on 13 March, will come full circle with the introduction of a new international name – Stockholm Business School (SBS).
  • New study shows connection between olfactory impairment and later dementia 2014-02-27 A unique new study shows a connection between olfactory impairment and later dementia. Self-reported olfactory impairment and/or an inability to identify odors can be an early sign of dementia conversion within the next ten years. The study is the first of its kind to follow people from healthy ageing to dementia, focusing on olfactory impairment.
  • Detailed cancer diagnostics with new analysis method 2013-12-03 New cancer treatments require good prior characterization of the tumour. Today, molecular diagnostics is time-consuming work, and important knowledge is still lacking when it comes to how drugs should best be used for individual patients. Scientists at the Science for Life Laboratory in Uppsala and Stockholm have now developed a new technique for discovering mutations in cancer tissues. The study is now published in Oncotarget.
  • Orjan Gustafsson (left) and Martin Kruså take sediment samples in the sea north of Siberia during the arctic expedition, 2008. Photo: Jorien Vonk Methane bubbling from thawed subsea permafrost in Arctic Siberia 2013-12-02 In this week’s issue of Nature Geoscience, a Russian-US-Swedish study show extensive release of the powerful greenhouse gas methane from the East Siberian Arctic Seas, a shallow coastal ocean covering an area equivalent to four times the area of Sweden.
  • Large grant to Stockholm University for supernova research 2013-11-05 Stockholm University has received a large grant for supernova research. A research team led by Professor Jesper Sollerman from the Department of Astronomy has received SEK 33 million from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation to study supernova explosions.
  • Criminology Prize winners proved limits of imprisonment

 2013-10-30 The work of Daniel S. Nagin and Joan Petersilia has helped to re-shape the use of prison and community corrections based on evidence of what works – and what doesn’t. This was the motivation of the jury when the winners of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology were announced today, October 30.
  • A new take on efficient delivery in regenerative medicine 2013-10-23 An international research group has successfully tested the use of a new type of porous material for the efficient delivery of key molecules to transplanted cells derived from stem cells. These results can lead to improvements in the way stem cell-based neurodegenerative diseases are treated.
  • Gunhild Rosqvist and Torbjörn Karlin taking measurements at Kebnekaise.
Photo: Matthias Rieckh The battle for Sweden's highest peak 2013-09-16 Kebnekaise, Sweden's highest peak, has now reached its lowest level since measurements began in 1902. This result was discovered during the traditional measurement of Kebnekaise, carried out at the end of each summer season at Tarfala, Stockholm University's research centre. The south peak was measured at 2,099 metres above sea level; just 2.7 metres now separates the south peak from the north peak, which measures 2,096.3 metres.
  • Researchers constrain the sources air pollution from China 2013-08-08 Particulate air pollution from incomplete combustion is affecting climate over East Asia more than carbon dioxide and cause premature deaths of over half a million annually in China alone, yet its sources have been poorly understood.
  • New method reads the genetic code directly in tumour tissue 2013-07-15 Accurate diagnostic tests are crucial when choosing the right treatment regime for cancer patients. This is why scientists from Stockholm University and Uppsala University continuously work on improving methods for analysing cancer tissues. For the first time, it is now possible to read the genetic code of individual cancer cells in their original location in the tissue. The results are published in Nature Methods.
  • Inefficient EU securities market facing a crossroads 2013-07-03 Compared with the US, the securities market in the EU is less economically efficient. This is because the regulatory system and the technical infrastructure for securities transactions differ between the two trade areas. Thomas Ordeberg has established this in a new doctoral dissertation from the Faculty of Law, Stockholm University. In the dissertation he also gives an account of what options the EU has available to make its securities market more efficient. Thomas Ordeberg is desk officer at the Ministry of Finance.
  • Storspigg. Foto: Johan Lind Humans cause rapid evolution in Baltic Sea fish 2013-06-25 In a new dissertation, Emma Lind shows that the three-spined stickleback fish have developed genetically in a short time in response to the environmental impact of humans.
  • Being well received in care speeds up healing process 2013-06-06 A placebo can activate a number of biological mechanisms in the same way that medicine can, which is why we are now beginning to understand why a placebo can heal and alleviate symptoms. Psychosocial factors, such as words or how a person is received, can help to heal or bring relief. These findings are being presented by the Italian researcher Fabrizio Benedetti, who is the keynote speaker at the PNIRS 20th Scientific Meeting in Stockholm on Thursday, June 6.
  • Pioneering discoveries on the brain and immune defense 2013-05-29 It’s true that the brain governs the body, but the body also governs the brain, for example when the immune defense system makes us rest when we’re sick.
  • Young teenagers playing violent video games become accustomed to violence 2013-05-20 Young teenagers who play a lot of violent video games show blunted physiological and emotional responses to playing violent games, according a study from Stockholm University.
  • Regional climate changes over the last 2,000 years mapped for the first time 2013-05-16 An international team of 78 researchers from 24 countries have joined forces to learn how temperature has changed in the past 1- 2,000 years at the continental scale.
  • Human cultural capacities are older than 170,000 years 2013-05-08 Researchers at Stockholm University have used methodology from evolutionary biology together with observations from genetics, paleoanthropology, archaeology and linguistics to determine that human capacities for culture must be more than 170,000 years old.
  • Arctic summer sea ice extent controlled by atmospheric transport 2013-04-29 The retreat of the summer sea ice in the Arctic region is one of the most dramatic signs of the ongoing climate change. Although the ice cover is steadily decreasing it also shows a large variability from year to year. In a new study, published in the scientific journal Nature Climate Change, researches at Stockholm University have examined the variability of the Arctic sea ice. They concluded that warm and humid winds from southerly latitudes towards the Arctic in spring are important for the amount of sea ice later in the summer.
  • Scent of a woman - not that feminine 2013-04-18 In stores, most perfumes are categorized as either feminine or masculine, but a new dissertation from Stockholm University shows that many perfumes are perceived as "unisex", and that these are the scents preferred by most people.
  • Dirty dishes show Ice Age hunters’ taste for fish 2013-04-11 Hunters and gatherers who lived during the Ice Age made pottery vessels for cooking fish, according to a new international study, published today in Nature. Researchers have analysed food residues found in pottery vessels, up to 15,000 years old. This has resulted in the hitherto oldest direct evidence of prehistoric vessel use.
  • Lya i blått. Här kan man se hur galaxen badar i ett blått och diffust moln av Lyman alfa.
Foto: M. Hayes. Unique study shows light’s (roundabout) way through galaxies 2013-04-05 Researchers working in the international LARS project at Stockholm University have published a unique and comprehensive study on starburst galaxies.
  • Democratic Revolutions: Patience Pays 2013-03-20 Before the 20th century, the path to democracy was more than half a century long. Today, the process can be very rapid. However, democracies with lengthy transitions survive longer. This is shown in a scientific paper in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, where researchers at Stockholm University have analysed all the transitions between autocracy and democracy that have ever taken place.
  • X-ray laser reveals chemical reaction 2013-03-18 What happens when a chemical bond is broken? That question was recently answered with the help of a so-called free electron x-ray laser, which makes it possible to follow in real time how bonds in a molecule are changed and broken. The study, published in Science, found, among other things, evidence of a much-discussed intermediate state before molecules bind to or leave a metal surface. The possibility of monitoring at the molecular level how the electronic structure changes during a chemical reaction creates entirely new opportunities for investigating and understanding key chemical processes in detail.
  • Astrid Söderbergh Widding takes office as Vice-Chancellor 2013-02-01 The university world has been a theme throughout the career of film researcher Astrid Söderbergh Widding, but she is is probably best known to the public as former film critic and media columnist in the Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet.
  • New research project examines changes in family formation and social policies across Europe 2013-01-31 Are existing social and family policies compatible with changes in family patterns? Livia Oláh will coordinate a major European research project investigating the diversity of family forms, relationships and life courses in Europe in relation to policies.
  • NEEM ice core drilling project på nordvästra Grönland. Foto: Sune Olander Rasmussen, NEEM ice core drilling project. A warmer Greenland 2013-01-24 A new study provides surprising details on changes in the Earth’s climate during the Eemian interglacial period, more than 100,000 years ago.
  • Illustration: P.B Holliland New research changes the image of the typical computer gamer 2013-01-14 The image of the computer gamer as a young male loner who spends hours playing computer games with strangers around the world, is not true, according to a new dissertation.
  • Institute for Solar Physics to be established at Stockholm University 2012-12-19 With a Swedish telescope, researchers study the Sun from La Palma, the most north-westerly of the Canary Islands. As of 1 January 2013, the Institute for Solar Physics, which conducts the research, will be established at Stockholm University, which then takes over the running of the Institute from the Royal Academy of Sciences.
  • Albano park and entrance building, view to the west. Photo: City Planning Administration Decision on Albano is important milestone for entire Stockholm 2013-01-11 When the City Council of Stockholm adopted the local plan for the future campus Albano on 16 December, it was an important milestone for higher education in the city.
  • A question of quality when Stockholm University invests in more female professors 2012-12-06 Stockholm University does not content itself with having the second highest proportion of female professors in the country. Therefore, the University invests SEK 15 million to increase the number of women by offering more time for research to female researchers, and for the recruitment of female guest professors.
  • Nobel Prize laureate Mo Yan visits Stockholm University 2012-12-05 Listen to this year's Nobel Prize laureate in Literature, the Chinese writer Mo Yan, on 9 December at Stockholm University. He will read a piece from his own work and talk with researchers, translators and the audience.
  • Live academic talk show premieres 2012-11-16 Crosstalks is the name of the web TV programme which premieres on 20 November. Here you will encounter lively and interesting discussions between leading researchers, the audience and people around the world. One of the aims is to attract top international researchers to Stockholm, but also to arouse the curiosity of the world's young talents in the Stockholm region with its universities and companies. Stockholm University and KTH are behind the programme.
  • Even small amounts of alcohol increase cancer risk 2012-11-09 Drinking a glass of wine a day is considered healthy, but new research shows that even small amounts of alcohol can increase the risk of cancer. In a study published in the British journal Carcinogenesis, researchers at Stockholm University, in a European collaboration project, have examined the damage to the genome that occurs when we drink alcohol, which, in turn, can lead to cancer.
  • International scientist career at Stockholm University 2012-11-02 Stockholm University now offers talented scientists at the beginning of their careers a unique opportunity to continue their academic journeys at any of the University's departments.
  • Astrid Söderbergh Widding appointed new Vice-Chancellor 2012-10-25 The Government has appointed Professor Astrid Söderbergh Widding as Vice-Chancellor at Stockholm University. She is appointed from 1 February 2013 for six years.
  • Thomas Elmqvist Stockholm and Malmö at the forefront of sustainable urban development according to a new UN study 2012-10-16 Global urbanization will have significant implications for biodiversity and ecosystems if current trends continue, with knock-on effects for human health and development, according to a new assessment by the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).
  • Stockholm University takes its place in the world - investing 100 million in international relations 2012-10-02 25 new postdoctoral positions for international students, an institute for advanced studies and a special program for cooperation with selected universities: these are part of the result when Stockholm University is investing SEK 100 million in order to strengthen its international relations.
  • Unique screening method simplifies identification of novel drugs 2012-06-05 A unique new method of measuring how effectively DNA building blocks are made is a perfect springboard from which to find novel drugs against resistant bacteria or even cancer. Already when a potential drug lead is identified this novel method also pinpoints how the substance may inhibit cell division, thereby facilitating further development of the drug. Two researchers at Stockholm University and Karolinska Institute present their results in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences PNAS, USA.
  • Stockholm University is the home of outstanding education and research, and a place where open minds meet, discuss and develop Stockholm University’s honorary doctors in 2012 2012-05-25 Stockholm University has selected this year's honorary doctors. They include Katherine Freese, who is one of the world’s best know astroparticle physicists and the cartographer Lars Granath, whose nautical maps have “doubled the size of the Swedish archipelagos”. In the legal area Annette Kur and David B. Wilkins have been selected. Marjatta Hietala och Milton Núñez have been selected in the humanities. In natural science Ray Dixon and Isabella Raffi have been selected, in addition to the above-mentioned Katherine Freese and Lars Granath. Keith Banting has been selected in social sciences. More information about the honorary doctors is given below, along with contact details.
  • Rektor Kåre Bremer Historic investment in SciLifeLab welcomed 2012-04-03 The presidents of the four Swedish universities behind the Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) welcome the huge new investments in life science research announced today.
  • Roberto Riva, Department of Psychology Women with chronic musculoskeletal pain: Do physiological responses follow a temporal development? 2012-03-05 A new thesis from the Department of Psychology at Stockholm University shows that investigating the stress hormones as an index of physiological stress responses in women with shoulder and neck pain or with fibromyalgia may help to clarify the onset and development of such conditions.
  • New zeolite material may solve diesel shortage 2012-02-06 World fuel consumption is shifting more and more to diesel at the expense of gasoline. A recently published article in Nature Chemistry by a research team at Stockholm University and the Polytechnic University of Valencia in Spain presents a new porous material that evinces unique properties for converting gasoline directly into diesel. The material has a tremendously complex atomic structure that could only be determined with the aid of transmission electron microscopy.
  • Patrik Lindenfors, Fredrik Jansson, Mikael Sandberg Democratization takes place in rapid leaps 2011-12-05 Democratization is often viewed as a slow process. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have analyzed all transitions to democracy that have ever occurred. This research shows that in reality, democratization is a rapid process. In half of all cases it has taken less than 2.4 years to go from dictatorship to democracy, and in nearly a quarter of the cases the process took place overnight.
  • One step closer to dark matter in universe 2011-11-02 Scientists all over the world are working feverishly to find the dark matter in the universe. Now researchers at Stockholm University have taken one step closer to solving the enigma with a new method.
  • Stockholm University physicist in Nobel Laureate's research group 2011-10-05 Ariel Goobar, Professor in Experimental Particle Astrophysics is one of the researchers involved in the research group led by Saul Perlmutter, Nobel Laureate in Physics 2011.
  • Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz Exercise at work boosts productivity 2011-09-07 Devoting work time to physical activity can lead to higher productivity. This is shown in a study performed by researchers at Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet that is being published in Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
  • The images were captured in the red segment of the visible spectrum. However, the colours were added afterward and do not correspond to what we would see with our eyes. Different scales were used for the ring and the rest of the image to make details stand out more clearly. Exploding star shines brighter 2011-06-17 Researchers at Stockholm University have studied the exploding star Supernova 1987A. In an article published in Nature, they present findings that show, among other things, that the supernova has entered a new phase of shining ever more brightly.
  • The Titan Arum or Amorphophallus titanum Rare giant flower soon to bloom in Bergius Botanic Garden 2011-05-12 One of the wonders of the plant world–the Titan Arum or Amorphophallus titanium–is about to bloom in the Edvard Anderson Greenhouse in the Bergius Botanic Garden. The species has only flowered twice before in Sweden—the first time being in 1935 in the Bergius Botanic Garden. The spectacular plant is distinguished by its large size, odd shape and the terrible stench. Once in bloom, the flower lasts only for two or three days.
  • Ten new honorary doctors at Stockholm University 2011-04-12 Stockholm University has selected the recipients of Honorary Doctorates in 2011.
  • Mikael Rostila participates in the research project ‘Migrants’ health and the facets of ethnic segregation’ at CHESS. The project is financed by the Swedish Research Council (VR). Losing a parent can be fatal 2011-03-30 The death of parents entails an increase in their children’s risk of dying. This is shown in a new study performed by Mikael Rostila, a researcher at the Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS) in Sweden, and Jan Saarela, a researcher at Åbo Akademi University in Finland. Those especially affected are younger children, and primarily if they lose their mother.
  • The Swedish Research Council's evaluation: SWEDARCTIC and SWEDARP 2011–2015: Prioritized projects of the Swedish Arctic and Antarctic programmes World-leading polar research at the University 2011-04-06 Three polar research projects at Stockholm University are considered world-leading by the Swedish Research Council.
  • Swedish cancer researcher receives major grant 2011-02-07 Thomas Helleday, professor at Stockholm University and the University of Oxford, is to receive 23 million kronor (2.5 million Euros) from the European Research Council (ERC). The grant is given to support research that can lead to better cancer treatment. Helleday is the youngest Swede to receive the prestigious grant.
  • A new study led by researchers from Stockholm University shows that taking early retirement reduces tiredness and depression. Photo: Morguefile user Retire early and enjoy better health 2012-03-07 A new study led by researchers from Stockholm University shows that taking early retirement reduces tiredness and depression.
  • The electrodes (gold) of the trap used to combine positrons and antiprotons to form antihydrogen.
Image: N. Madsen. ALPHA/SWANSEA Antimatter trapped with Swedish participation 2010-11-18 The international collaboration ALPHA has for the first time trapped atoms of antimatter. This mysterious mirror image of ordinary matter will now be studied in order to understand why our world is made up of only ordinary matter. Svante Jonsell, physicist at Stockholm University, and his colleagues now publish their new results in the prestigious scientific journal Nature.
  • Photo: Kambiz Fathi The Universe likes to form galaxies similar to the Milky Way 2010-10-12 Galaxies like our own Milky Way formed easily and have also been the largest spiral galaxies in the universe for almost 4 billion years. This is shown in a new study by associate professor Kambiz Fathi of the Department of Astronomy at Stockholm University. The study is now published in the prestigious scientific journal The Astrophysical Journal Letters.
  • Learn the language and make better business abroad 2010-11-18 Being able to speak the local tongue could be decisive for anyone wishing to win contracts and do successful business abroad. Seventy-five percent of Sweden’s export goes to Europe, where Central and Eastern Europe are the fastest growing regions. However, many expatriate managers could markedly improve their communication skills on these markets. This is shown by Kjell Ljungbo in a recently defended doctoral thesis in intercultural business communication from Stockholm University’s School of Business. Kjell Ljungbo will present his findings at Stockholm University 6-7 October 2010 at the University’s “Forskardagarna” event, during which new doctors present their theses.
  • Islamic political control increases female education 2010-10-06 Islamic political participation increases female participation in non-religious education in Turkey. This finding is revealed in a new doctoral dissertation from Stockholm University, presented 23 September 2010. The Islamic movement in Turkey has played a crucial role in increasing enrolment among the poor and pious, according to Erik Meyersson from the Institute for International Economic Studies.
  • The news report (in Swedish) <i>Oljud bra för vissa barn</i></a> “Louder at the back, please” 2010-10-06 Playing white noise in class can help inattentive children learn. Researchers writing in BioMed Central’s open access journal Behavioral and Brain Functions tested the effect of the meaningless random noise on a group of 51 schoolchildren, finding that although it hindered the ability of those who normally pay attention, it improved the memory of those that had difficulties in paying attention.
  • Photo: Hege Vestheim Breathtaking fish in Science 2010-08-04 Novel discoveries report how a unique fish species has adapted to a hostile environment poisonous to most other organisms. The findings were published in Science July 15th.
  • Photo: Innventia/Wikipedia Making nanopaper and nanocellulose gels magnetic 2010-08-04 Researchers from Stockholm University, together with colleagues from KTH, have modified bacterial cellulose with magnetic nanoparticles to produce a hybrid nanocomposite that can be used as a magnetic hydrogel, aerogel, or compress to a stiff nanopaper. This material could be used for a variety of purposes ranging from counterfeiting mechanisms for banknotes to high-gradient magnetic separation.
  • New process for natural phosphorus removal 2010-07-30 Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all marine organisms. High concentrations of phosphorus disturb the balance of marine ecosystems and have been identified as the main culprit for coastal eutrophication in the Baltic Sea. Researchers from inter alia Stockholm University now reports on a new process for natural phosphorus removal.
  • DSV hosts Nordic Digra – new Nordic game Conference 2010-07-09 On August 16 and 17, the Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) will host the first Nordic Digra – a new Nordic game Conference focusing on games, gaming and gamers.
  • Researchers from around the world gather to discuss brown fat and obesity 2010-07-07 Researchers from all over the world will meet at Stockholm University this weekend, July 10 and 11, to discuss for the first time the connection in adult humans between brown fat and the risk of becoming obese.
  • Photo: Jakob Heyman Glaciers in Tibet – never really large 2010-06-03 The Tibetan Plateau is the largest and highest mountain region on Earth with glaciers whose meltwater provides the water supply for more than 1.3 billion people through several of the largest rivers in Asia. In a thesis in Physical Geography from Stockholm University, Jakob Heyman shows that the glaciers in Tibet have remained relatively small and have not been much larger than today for tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of years back in time.
  • When English becomes the medium of instruction: Communicative effectiveness is more important 2010-05-28 When English becomes the medium of instruction: Communicative effectiveness is more important than accuracy.
  • School of Business' Advisory Board is strengthened with international academic members 2010-05-26 Stockholm University School of Business’ Advisory Board is strengthened through the addition of three well-qualified international members: Finn Junge Jensen, Peter Moizer and Jaap Spronk.
  • Defendant's gender affects length of sentence 2010-05-26 A study of 300 simulated court cases shows that experienced judges, jury members, prosecutors, police officers, and lawyers make decisions and convict defendants differently depending on whether they are men or women and what the defendant looks like. Eyewitnesses to crimes are also affected by these factors. This is especially pronounced if there is an extended period of time separating the crime and the testimony. This is what Angela S. Ahola, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, shows in her dissertation.
  • Sulfur in marine archaeological shipwrecks – the “hull story” gives a sour aftertaste 2010-04-26 Advanced chemical analyses reveal that, with the help of smart scavenging bacteria, sulfur and iron compounds accumulated in the timbers of the Swedish warship Vasa during her 333 years on the seabed of the Stockholm harbour. Contact with oxygen, in conjunction with the high humidity of the museum environment, causes these contaminants to produce sulfuric acid, according to a new doctoral thesis in chemistry from Stockholm University.
  • This composite image of the GOODS-South field — the result of an extremely deep survey using two of the four giant 8.2-metre telescopes composing ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) and a unique custom-built filter — shows some of the faintest galaxies ever seen. It also allows astronomers to determine that 90% of galaxies whose light took 10 billion years to reach us have gone undiscovered. <p>The image is based on data acquired with the FORS and HAWK-I instruments on the VLT. It shows in particular two varieties of light emitted by excited hydrogen atoms, known as Lyman-alpha and H-alpha. Credit: ESO/M. Hayes</p> Explained: Why many surveys of distant galaxies miss 90% of their targets 2010-04-26 Astronomers have long known that in many surveys of the very distant Universe, a large fraction of the total intrinsic light was not being observed. Now, thanks to an extremely deep survey using two of the four giant 8.2-metre telescopes that make up ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) and a unique custom-built filter, astronomers have determined that a large fraction of galaxies whose light took 10 billion years to reach us have gone undiscovered. The survey also helped uncover some of the faintest galaxies ever found at this early stage of the Universe.
  • Researchers at Stockholm University have analysed knowledge of chimpanzee behaviour and found that chimpanzee culture mostly is carried and transmitted by the females. Photo: Anna Lindenfors Research shows females are the carriers of chimpanzee culture 2010-03-25 How do young chimpanzees learn behaviours that are not genetically transmitted? Researchers at Stockholm University have analysed knowledge of chimpanzee behaviour and found that chimpanzee culture mostly is carried and transmitted by the females. The results are presented in the scientific journal PLoS ONE.
  • Landscapes managed to provide a lot of one services, such as pig production, can be costly because they have fewer of the hidden services, such as the regulation of nutrient pollution, which are also important to people. Photo: Morguefile user Penywise. Seeing the hidden services of nature 2010-03-03 International team of ecosystem researchers develop new approach for managing ecological tradeoffs.
  • A paralysed herring gull (/Larus argentatus/) suffering from star-gazing and difficulty in keeping the wings folded along the side of the body. The specimen is dying while incubating, an abnormal situation.
The specimen was photographed in the condition in which it was found. Prize for article about mortality among birds 2010-02-26 Last summer, researchers at the Department of Applied Environmental Science published an article demonstrating that thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency may explain increased mortality among birds in the Baltic Sea area. The article has now received an international prize as an exceptional article of the year.
  • Death and burial - how social identities are reflected in archeological grave material 2010-02-26 The function and placement of graves in a burial ground reflected the social role and status a person had in society during the Middle Ages. Factors such as gender, age, and health affected this evaluation and categorization of people. This is shown in a dissertation by Kristina Jonsson that was recently submitted at Stockholm University.
  • Unique Greek-Swedish research cooperation between industry and academia on environment and climate 2011-11-16 A unique Greek-Swedish research cooperation between industry and academia on environment and climate in the Mediterranean was signed today in Stockholm. The Academy of Athens, Stockholm University and TEMES launch a European research collaboration that represents an important step in efforts to increase Swedish and Greek cooperation in the field of environmental protection and sustainable development. (03.12.2009)
  • Survivors provide new information about the 2004 tsunami disaster 2009-11-17 It has been nearly five years since the tsunami hit the Indian Ocean on December 26, 2004. Together with survivors of the tsunami disaster, Johanna Mård Karlsson and research colleagues at Stockholm University have built a detailed reconstruction of the coastal impact of the tsunami in the Khao Lak area, Thailand. Besides achieving a better understanding of the event, they have been able to use the reconstruction to verify a new computer simulation of the impact of the tsunami in southeastern Thailand.
  • A strong invariant state among fragile quantum states 2009-11-11 Quantum states are in general very fragile and are easily destroyed by noise. There are, however, quantum states that can withstand much stronger hits than others, so called invariant states. The physicists Magnus Rådmark and Mohamed Bourennane at Stockholm University have recently succeeded to generate a high fidelity invariant state in six entangled photons. This invariant quantum state has potential applications in quantum computers and especially for quantum communication and quantum cryptography.
  • Diatoms reveal climate changes 2009-10-19 Some 500 years ago there was a change in the circulation in the atmosphere over Scandinavia. This probably led to increased amounts of winter precipitation in northern Sweden for a period. This is shown in a new dissertation in physical geography at Stockholm University.
  • Photo: J. Lokrantz/Azote Elinor Ostrom of Stockholm Resilience Centre shares economy prize 2009-10-13 American economists Elinor Ostrom and Oliver E. Williamson will share the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. Elinor Ostrom is on the board of the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University and is regularly active in research and teaching there.
  • New research explains why cultivation of biofuels leads to more greenhouse gas 2009-10-12 In a scientific article from 2008, Nobel laureate in chemistry Paul Crutzen found that cultivating biofuels to replace fossil fuels can increase, rather than decrease, global warming. This finding, based on a calculation of how much laughing gas is released from cultivated land and winds up in the atmosphere, diverged considerably from the IPCC estimate. Crutzen’s global calculations are corroborated in a new article in Environmental Research Letters by scientists Georgia Desouni and Amélie Darracq at the Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology and the Bert Bolin Center from Climate Research, Stockholm University. The new article also explains the reason for the differences in comparison with the IPPC results.
  • Stockholm University and Imprimatur Capital collaborate to give support to young research companies 2009-09-25 SU Innovation at Stockholm University has signed an agreement with the British risk capital company Imprimatur Capital. Imprimatur Capital, with offices in over fifteen countries around the world, is investing in a long-term collaboration for the funding and development of the University’s business incubator and the projects that it includes.
  • Photo: chelle/Morguefile Scandinavians are descended from Stone Age immigrants 2009-09-25 Today’s Scandinavians are not descended from the people who came to Scandinavia at the conclusion of the last ice age but, apparently, from a population that arrived later, concurrently with the introduction of agriculture. This is one conclusion of a new study straddling the borderline between genetics and archaeology, which involved Swedish researchers and which has now been published in the journal Current Biology.
  • Doctorates and honorary doctorates to be awarded at Stockholm City Hall 2009-09-25 On Friday, September 25th, eight honorary doctorates will be conferred during the University's graduation and installation ceremony in the Blue Hall at Stockholm City Hall. Among the new honorary doctors are the author and Professor Cecilia Lindqvist and Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, Thomas Hammarberg. Others include professors Okko Behrend, Germany, Michael Long and Daniel Stern, United States, Paul Artaxo, Brazil, Janos Mink, Hungary and James Whelan, Australia.
  • Press release by the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, The Australian National University, University of Copenhagen and University of Minnesota Planetary Boundaries: A Safe Operating Space for Humanity 2009-09-23 New approaches are needed to help humanity deal with climate change and other global environmental threats that lie ahead in the 21st century. A group of 28 internationally renowned scientists propose that global biophysical boundaries, identified on the basis of the scientific understanding of the Earth System, can define a ‘safe planetary operating space’ that will allow humanity to continue to develop and thrive for generations to come. This new approach to sustainable development is conveyed in the coming issue of the scientific journal Nature where the scientists have made a first attempt to identify and quantify a set of nine planetary boundaries.
  • The art of passing the buck 2009-09-17 How are the claims of Indigenous peoples dealt with by states and corporations? Rebecca Lawrence, in her PhD dissertation in Sociology presented at Stockholm University on Friday September 11, illustrates that both states and corporations attempt to ignore Indigenous peoples’ rights (urfolksrättigheter) by claiming that responsibility for protecting those rights lies with the other party.
  • Early infection and protection against allergies? 2009-06-22 Allergies have become more common in the last few decades. It is still not fully clear why certain people develop allergies, but a strong risk factor is if the mother is allergic. Also, changes in life style are seen as playing a major role and several studies indicate that early exposure to bacteria and viruses may reduce the risk of allergies later in life. A dissertation in immunology at Stockholm University can now demonstrate a connection between infection by the herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, in small children and protection against the production of allergy-related antibodies.
  • Bioinformatic reconstruction of global networks provides shortcuts to protein functions 2009-06-22 Researchers at the Stockholm Bioinformatics Center have developed bioinformatic methods for reconstructing global networks of proteins and genes that interact with each other functionally. Eight different types of large-scale genomic, proteomic, and functional genetic data have been combined in the largest reconstructions ever of networks in nine different species. The work is published in the June issue of the journal Genome Research, and the networks are available to researchers and others via a Web-based database.
  • Tommy Larsson Segerlind. author of the study, Solo is not strong – a study of team entrepreneurship 2009-05-29 Behind many new, innovative companies there often lies more than one founder. Starting a venture in a team, however, is a neglected area both in research and in practice. A new dissertation in business administration contributes to our understanding of how these "venture teams" are formed, develop and finally dissolve. At the same time, the study focuses on how the roles in the team are created and develop over time in relation to the innovation process in new start-ups.
  • Karin Wallin, author of the study Who owns things that do not exist? 2009-05-29 - On fictions, gaps in the law, and the uncertainty of the securities trade.
  • Jenny Svensson will publicly defend her dissertation, The Regulation of Rule-Following. Imitation and Soft Regulation in the European Union, on Friday, June 5, at 10:00 a.m. in Hall MB 503, Södertörn University, Alfred Nobels Allé 7. New regulatory opportunities for the EU: Rules for how rules are to be followed 2009-05-22 The European Union readily brings to mind rules and regulations regarding everything from the shape of a cucumber to the generation of statistics. The EU's formal regulations consist of more than 300,000 legal documents. However, a new dissertation in business studies at Stockholm University in Sweden shows that, in practice, the regulation of the EU is much more comprehensive than that.
  • Lead author Johan Rockström from the Stockholm Environment Institute and the Stockholm Resilience Centre Better water use could reduce future food crises 2009-05-06 If the overall water resources in river basins were acknowledged and managed better, future food crises could be significantly reduced, say researchers from Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute and Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.
  • Invitation to 150th Anniversary Celebration: Chemist and Nobel Laureate Svante Arrhenius 2009-02-19 Chemist and Nobel Laureate Svante Arrhenius was one of the greatest naturalists of our times. He was also one of the very first scientists to make the link between the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global temperature levels – what we now call the greenhouse effect.
  • How we are tricked into providing our personal information 2009-01-19 We human beings don't always do as we have been taught, and organizations are poorly prepared for IT security attacks that target human weaknesses. Since it is difficult to change people's behavior, it doesn't help to provide training about how to behave securely. This is shown by Marcus Nohlberg in his dissertation at Stockholm University in Sweden in which he studied attacks that are called social engineering in IT contexts.

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