Press releases

Press releases

  • How the cat parasite exploits immune cells to reach the brain 2017-12-07 Scientists have previously shown that a parasite from cats can infect people's brain and affect our behaviour. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have discovered how the parasite takes control of our cells.
  • Professor Anders Nilsson Water Exists as Two Different Liquids 2017-06-28 Scientists at Stockholm University have discovered two phases of liquid water with large differences in structure and density.
  • Sahara greening intensify cyclone activity 2017-06-08 Future climate warming could lead to a re-greening of the southernmost Sahara, with decreased dust emissions and changes in land cover.
  • Three ERC Advanced Grants to Stockholm University 2017-03-24 Frank Wilczek, professor at the Department of Physics and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Johan Rockström, Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre and David Strömberg at the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES). These three professors at Stockholm University will receive prestigious ERC Advanced Grants.
  • Photo: Jana Weiss High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats 2017-02-24 A study from Stockholm University has now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes.
  • Herring gull with thiamine deficiency, Photo: Lennart Balk Thiamine deficiency in wildlife more widespread than previously thought 2017-01-02 Deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in wildlife was previously described as a problem among certain species within relatively limited geographical areas. Now, researchers at ACES, together with colleagues from several other research institutions in Europe and North America, show that thiamine deficiency is far more widespread than previously thought.
  • Amid rapid change, major Arctic study highlights need to prepare for surprises 2016-11-25 The Arctic Resilience Report, published today, is the first comprehensive assessment of ecosystems and societies in the region. It identifies 19 “tipping points” in natural systems that could radically reshape the Arctic in the coming century, and calls for urgent cooperation to build local communities’ resilience and capacity to adapt to rapid and widespread change.
  • Drought-tolerant species thrive despite returning rains in the Sahel 2016-10-19 Following the devastating droughts in the Sahel region south of the Sahara desert, vegetation has now recovered. What surprises the researchers is that although it is now raining more and has become greener, it is particularly the more drought resistant species that thrive. The conclusion is that not only rain but also agriculture and human utilization of trees, bushes and land affect the plants recovering.
  • Illustration av hur ljus omvandlas av galaxen till ALP. Dark matter does not contain certain axion-like particles 2016-04-22 Researches at Stockholm University are getting closer to understanding dark-matter particle models. Observations can rule out some axion-like particles in the quest for the content of dark matter.
  • Klippor och hav. Foto: Catarina Nilsson/Mostphotos Copper gives an answer to the rise of oxygen 2016-04-18 A new study presents evidence that the rise of atmospheric oxygenation did indeed occur 2.4–2.1 billion years ago. It also shows that biological usage of copper became prominent after the so called “Great Oxidation Event”. An international team of researchers has recently published the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
  • Torkkänsliga tusenåriga träd från bergen i Grekland. Indirekta belägg för variationer i neder-börd och torka såsom trädringsserier användes av forskarna för att rekonstruera variationer i relativ vattentillgång på norra halvklotet under tolv århundraden. Foto: Paul J. Krusic. Large variations in precipitation over the past millennium 2016-04-06 According to a new study in Nature, the Northern Hemisphere has experienced considerably larger variations in precipitation during the past twelve centuries than in the twentieth century. Researchers from Sweden, Germany, and Switzerland have found that climate models overestimated the increase in wet and dry extremes as temperatures increased during the twentieth century. The new results will enable us to improve the accuracy of climate models and to better predict future precipitation changes.
  • guppyhane Small brain is good for the immune system – if you are a fish 2016-03-29 A new study shows that guppies with smaller brains have stronger immune responses than guppies with larger brains.
  • New Nordic Centre of Excellence focusing on Arctic mining communities 2016-01-22 A Nordic Centre of Excellence funded by NordForsk will build an interdisciplinary research environment to provide new thinking about sustainable development, especially in the context of Arctic mining. The new centre is led by KTH Royal Institute of Technology in collaboration with Stockholm University and Stockholm Environment Institute.
  • Yanhang Ma och Peter Oleynikov har många modeller av material på sitt kontor. Men inte någon modell av det nya materialet. First material to be woven at nano level 2016-01-22 For the first time, scientists have been able to weave a material at molecular level. The research is led by University of California Berkeley, in cooperation with Stockholm University.
  • Havsbild Ocean toxicity hampered the rapid evolution of complex life 2015-12-04 By examining rocks at the bottom of ancient oceans, an international group of researchers have revealed that arsenic concentrations in the oceans have varied greatly over time. But also that in the very early oceans, arsenic co-varied with the rise of atmospheric oxygen and coincided with the coming and going of global glaciations.
  • Den asiatiska elefanten har de kortaste spermierna i förhållande till sin kroppsstorlek medan husmusen har de längsta . Människo- och elefantspermier är ungefär lika långa, mindre än hälften så långa som husmusens. Foto: Mostphotos. Fighting and Females Determine How Males Make Sperm 2015-11-18 Why do mice have longer sperm than elephants? A new study shows that the size of the female’s reproductive tract holds the key for understanding how males make sperm.
  • Scientists on the way to Petermann glacier 2015-07-20 On July 27, Swedish polar scientists set off to Greenland to meet the icebreaker Oden in Thule. The mission this time is to examine the Petermann Glacier in north-western Greenland.
  • New family of chemical structures can effectively remove CO2 from gas mixtures 2015-07-15 A newly discovered family of chemical structures, published in Nature, could increase the value of biogas and natural gas that contains carbon dioxide.
  • Norris damm Global freshwater consumption crossing its planetary boundary 2015-07-06 Planetary boundaries have been proposed to describe a safe operating space of humanity. Human consumption of freshwater is the used control variable for a freshwater planetary boundary. Research from Stockholm University is now showing that global freshwater consumption has already pushed beyond its boundary. The article is published in Science.
  • Sand-hopper (Gammarus locusta). Photo: Johan Eklöf. High biodiversity gives healthy seagrass beds 2015-05-20 Loss of algal-feeding invertebrates have surprisingly large effects on health of valuable seagrass meadows. These are the new results from a unique set of coordinated experiments.
  • Love Dalen with tusk in Siberia Woolly mammoth genomes mapped 2015-04-27 Before the world's last woolly mammoth took its final breath, the iconic animals had already suffered from a considerable loss of genetic diversity. These findings were made in the first ever publication of the full DNA sequence of the extinct animal by an international team of scientists from Stockholm University, the Swedish Museum of Natural History and Harvard Medical School among others.
  • Rotationskurvans spår över Vintergatan sedd från södra halvklotet. Spårämnena är färgkodade i blått eller rött beroende på deras relativa rörelse i förhållande till solen Den blå glorian illustrerar den mörka materiens fördelning. Foto: Serge Brunier. Evidence for dark matter in the inner Milky Way 2015-02-13 A new study is providing evidence for the presence of dark matter in the innermost part of the Milky Way, including in our own cosmic neighbourhood and the Earth’s location.
  • Four of nine planetary boundaries now crossed 2015-01-16 Four of nine planetary boundaries have now been crossed as a result of human activity, says an international team of 18 researchers with representatives from Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University in the journal Science, published 16 January. Crossing the boundaries could have serious consequences, both in the present and the future.
  • Two – three times higher levels of brominated flame retardants in toddlers compared to their mothers 2014-12-10 Toddlers are more exposed to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) at home than their mothers, shows a new doctoral thesis from Stockholm University.
  • Using ground-penetrating radar. Photo: Martin Rundkvist. Major Viking Hall Identified in Sweden 2014-12-08 A Viking feasting hall measuring almost 50 metres in length has been identified near Vadstena in Sweden. Archaeologists from Stockholm University and Umeå University used ground-penetrating radar, a non-invasive geophysical method, to locate and map the house foundation.
  • Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals 2014-10-28 Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers’ instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a selection of hand blenders which are available on the Swedish market.
  • University researcher won competition in protein structure prediction 2014-07-18 A research group at SciLifeLab, led by Jens Carlsson at Stockholm University, has won a worldwide competition (GPCR DOCK 2013) to predict the three-dimensional structure of a G protein-coupled receptor using computer modeling. Their results are published in two articles in the scientific journal Structure.
  • Small crustaceans help us assess the effects of pollution and oxygen deficiency in the Baltic sea 2014-06-18 Two of the most pressing environmental problems in the Baltic Sea are pollution and oxygen deficiency. Despite this, our knowledge about how this affects the animals living in the sea is limited. To test the single and combined effects of polluted sediment and oxygen deficiency on benthic organisms small crustaceans (Monoporeia affinis) from the Baltic Sea were studied in experiments. These crustaceans were demonstrated to have a defence mechanism against the cellular damage that changes in water oxygen concentrations can induce. Exposure to polluted sediment was also shown to activate these defence mechanisms.
  • Honorary doctorates 2014 2014-04-15 Stockholm University has now chosen this year’s honorary doctors, all of whom have contributed in distinctive ways to the University's activities in research and education. Prominent names include Eleanor Sharpston, Advocate General at the Court of Justice of the European Union, and the renowned French philosopher Francois Recanati. Within the humanities, in addition to Recanati, recipients of this year’s honorary doctorates include Elaine Aston and Patricia K. Kuhl; in the social sciences: Sandra Wallman and Marie-Laure Djelic; and in the natural sciences: Maria João Ramos, Lynne B. McCusker, Walter Neupert and Thomas Rossby.
  • Poor mimics can succeed as long as they mimic the right trait 2014-04-10 There are both perfect and imperfect mimics in nature. An imperfect mimic might have a different body shape, size or colour pattern arrangement compared to the species it mimics. Researchers have long been puzzled by the way poor mimicry can still be effective in fooling predators not to attack. In the journal Current Biology, researchers from Stockholm University now present a novel solution to the question of imperfect mimicry.
  • Deer droppings good for biodiversity 2014-04-08 By collecting deer droppings, and then growing the seeds found within, researchers from Stockholm University have been able to see how deer spread different types of plants.
  • New study shows connection between olfactory impairment and later dementia 2014-02-27 A unique new study shows a connection between olfactory impairment and later dementia. Self-reported olfactory impairment and/or an inability to identify odors can be an early sign of dementia conversion within the next ten years. The study is the first of its kind to follow people from healthy ageing to dementia, focusing on olfactory impairment.
  • Detailed cancer diagnostics with new analysis method 2013-12-03 New cancer treatments require good prior characterization of the tumour. Today, molecular diagnostics is time-consuming work, and important knowledge is still lacking when it comes to how drugs should best be used for individual patients. Scientists at the Science for Life Laboratory in Uppsala and Stockholm have now developed a new technique for discovering mutations in cancer tissues. The study is now published in Oncotarget.
  • Orjan Gustafsson (left) and Martin Kruså take sediment samples in the sea north of Siberia during the arctic expedition, 2008. Photo: Jorien Vonk Methane bubbling from thawed subsea permafrost in Arctic Siberia 2013-12-02 In this week’s issue of Nature Geoscience, a Russian-US-Swedish study show extensive release of the powerful greenhouse gas methane from the East Siberian Arctic Seas, a shallow coastal ocean covering an area equivalent to four times the area of Sweden.
  • Large grant to Stockholm University for supernova research 2013-11-05 Stockholm University has received a large grant for supernova research. A research team led by Professor Jesper Sollerman from the Department of Astronomy has received SEK 33 million from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation to study supernova explosions.
  • A new take on efficient delivery in regenerative medicine 2013-10-23 An international research group has successfully tested the use of a new type of porous material for the efficient delivery of key molecules to transplanted cells derived from stem cells. These results can lead to improvements in the way stem cell-based neurodegenerative diseases are treated.
  • Gunhild Rosqvist and Torbjörn Karlin taking measurements at Kebnekaise.
Photo: Matthias Rieckh The battle for Sweden's highest peak 2013-09-16 Kebnekaise, Sweden's highest peak, has now reached its lowest level since measurements began in 1902. This result was discovered during the traditional measurement of Kebnekaise, carried out at the end of each summer season at Tarfala, Stockholm University's research centre. The south peak was measured at 2,099 metres above sea level; just 2.7 metres now separates the south peak from the north peak, which measures 2,096.3 metres.
  • Researchers constrain the sources air pollution from China 2013-08-08 Particulate air pollution from incomplete combustion is affecting climate over East Asia more than carbon dioxide and cause premature deaths of over half a million annually in China alone, yet its sources have been poorly understood.
  • New method reads the genetic code directly in tumour tissue 2013-07-15 Accurate diagnostic tests are crucial when choosing the right treatment regime for cancer patients. This is why scientists from Stockholm University and Uppsala University continuously work on improving methods for analysing cancer tissues. For the first time, it is now possible to read the genetic code of individual cancer cells in their original location in the tissue. The results are published in Nature Methods.
  • Inefficient EU securities market facing a crossroads 2013-07-03 Compared with the US, the securities market in the EU is less economically efficient. This is because the regulatory system and the technical infrastructure for securities transactions differ between the two trade areas. Thomas Ordeberg has established this in a new doctoral dissertation from the Faculty of Law, Stockholm University. In the dissertation he also gives an account of what options the EU has available to make its securities market more efficient. Thomas Ordeberg is desk officer at the Ministry of Finance.
  • Storspigg. Foto: Johan Lind Humans cause rapid evolution in Baltic Sea fish 2013-06-25 In a new dissertation, Emma Lind shows that the three-spined stickleback fish have developed genetically in a short time in response to the environmental impact of humans.
  • Being well received in care speeds up healing process 2013-06-06 A placebo can activate a number of biological mechanisms in the same way that medicine can, which is why we are now beginning to understand why a placebo can heal and alleviate symptoms. Psychosocial factors, such as words or how a person is received, can help to heal or bring relief. These findings are being presented by the Italian researcher Fabrizio Benedetti, who is the keynote speaker at the PNIRS 20th Scientific Meeting in Stockholm on Thursday, June 6.
  • Pioneering discoveries on the brain and immune defense 2013-05-29 It’s true that the brain governs the body, but the body also governs the brain, for example when the immune defense system makes us rest when we’re sick.
  • Young teenagers playing violent video games become accustomed to violence 2013-05-20 Young teenagers who play a lot of violent video games show blunted physiological and emotional responses to playing violent games, according a study from Stockholm University.
  • Regional climate changes over the last 2,000 years mapped for the first time 2013-05-16 An international team of 78 researchers from 24 countries have joined forces to learn how temperature has changed in the past 1- 2,000 years at the continental scale.
  • Human cultural capacities are older than 170,000 years 2013-05-08 Researchers at Stockholm University have used methodology from evolutionary biology together with observations from genetics, paleoanthropology, archaeology and linguistics to determine that human capacities for culture must be more than 170,000 years old.
  • Arctic summer sea ice extent controlled by atmospheric transport 2013-04-29 The retreat of the summer sea ice in the Arctic region is one of the most dramatic signs of the ongoing climate change. Although the ice cover is steadily decreasing it also shows a large variability from year to year. In a new study, published in the scientific journal Nature Climate Change, researches at Stockholm University have examined the variability of the Arctic sea ice. They concluded that warm and humid winds from southerly latitudes towards the Arctic in spring are important for the amount of sea ice later in the summer.
  • Scent of a woman - not that feminine 2013-04-18 In stores, most perfumes are categorized as either feminine or masculine, but a new dissertation from Stockholm University shows that many perfumes are perceived as "unisex", and that these are the scents preferred by most people.
  • Dirty dishes show Ice Age hunters’ taste for fish 2013-04-11 Hunters and gatherers who lived during the Ice Age made pottery vessels for cooking fish, according to a new international study, published today in Nature. Researchers have analysed food residues found in pottery vessels, up to 15,000 years old. This has resulted in the hitherto oldest direct evidence of prehistoric vessel use.
  • Lya i blått. Här kan man se hur galaxen badar i ett blått och diffust moln av Lyman alfa.
Foto: M. Hayes. Unique study shows light’s (roundabout) way through galaxies 2013-04-05 Researchers working in the international LARS project at Stockholm University have published a unique and comprehensive study on starburst galaxies.
  • Democratic Revolutions: Patience Pays 2013-03-20 Before the 20th century, the path to democracy was more than half a century long. Today, the process can be very rapid. However, democracies with lengthy transitions survive longer. This is shown in a scientific paper in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, where researchers at Stockholm University have analysed all the transitions between autocracy and democracy that have ever taken place.
  • X-ray laser reveals chemical reaction 2013-03-18 What happens when a chemical bond is broken? That question was recently answered with the help of a so-called free electron x-ray laser, which makes it possible to follow in real time how bonds in a molecule are changed and broken. The study, published in Science, found, among other things, evidence of a much-discussed intermediate state before molecules bind to or leave a metal surface. The possibility of monitoring at the molecular level how the electronic structure changes during a chemical reaction creates entirely new opportunities for investigating and understanding key chemical processes in detail.
  • New research project examines changes in family formation and social policies across Europe 2013-01-31 Are existing social and family policies compatible with changes in family patterns? Livia Oláh will coordinate a major European research project investigating the diversity of family forms, relationships and life courses in Europe in relation to policies.
  • NEEM ice core drilling project på nordvästra Grönland. Foto: Sune Olander Rasmussen, NEEM ice core drilling project. A warmer Greenland 2013-01-24 A new study provides surprising details on changes in the Earth’s climate during the Eemian interglacial period, more than 100,000 years ago.
  • Illustration: P.B Holliland New research changes the image of the typical computer gamer 2013-01-14 The image of the computer gamer as a young male loner who spends hours playing computer games with strangers around the world, is not true, according to a new dissertation.
  • Ten new honorary doctors at Stockholm University 2011-04-12 Stockholm University has selected the recipients of Honorary Doctorates in 2011.
  • A paralysed herring gull (/Larus argentatus/) suffering from star-gazing and difficulty in keeping the wings folded along the side of the body. The specimen is dying while incubating, an abnormal situation.
The specimen was photographed in the condition in which it was found. Prize for article about mortality among birds 2010-02-26 Last summer, researchers at the Department of Applied Environmental Science published an article demonstrating that thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency may explain increased mortality among birds in the Baltic Sea area. The article has now received an international prize as an exceptional article of the year.
  • Survivors provide new information about the 2004 tsunami disaster 2009-11-17 It has been nearly five years since the tsunami hit the Indian Ocean on December 26, 2004. Together with survivors of the tsunami disaster, Johanna Mård Karlsson and research colleagues at Stockholm University have built a detailed reconstruction of the coastal impact of the tsunami in the Khao Lak area, Thailand. Besides achieving a better understanding of the event, they have been able to use the reconstruction to verify a new computer simulation of the impact of the tsunami in southeastern Thailand.
  • Diatoms reveal climate changes 2009-10-19 Some 500 years ago there was a change in the circulation in the atmosphere over Scandinavia. This probably led to increased amounts of winter precipitation in northern Sweden for a period. This is shown in a new dissertation in physical geography at Stockholm University.
  • New research explains why cultivation of biofuels leads to more greenhouse gas 2009-10-12 In a scientific article from 2008, Nobel laureate in chemistry Paul Crutzen found that cultivating biofuels to replace fossil fuels can increase, rather than decrease, global warming. This finding, based on a calculation of how much laughing gas is released from cultivated land and winds up in the atmosphere, diverged considerably from the IPCC estimate. Crutzen’s global calculations are corroborated in a new article in Environmental Research Letters by scientists Georgia Desouni and Amélie Darracq at the Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology and the Bert Bolin Center from Climate Research, Stockholm University. The new article also explains the reason for the differences in comparison with the IPPC results.
  • Lead author Johan Rockström from the Stockholm Environment Institute and the Stockholm Resilience Centre Better water use could reduce future food crises 2009-05-06 If the overall water resources in river basins were acknowledged and managed better, future food crises could be significantly reduced, say researchers from Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute and Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.
  • Invitation to 150th Anniversary Celebration: Chemist and Nobel Laureate Svante Arrhenius 2009-02-19 Chemist and Nobel Laureate Svante Arrhenius was one of the greatest naturalists of our times. He was also one of the very first scientists to make the link between the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global temperature levels – what we now call the greenhouse effect.

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