Wallenberg Academy Fellows

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Oscar Agertz. Foto: Markus Marcetic/Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse/Kungl. Vetenskapsakademien.

Simulations of how stars’ lives affect galaxies

The Universe contains a multitude of galaxies, everything from small dwarf galaxies to enormous elliptical ones. To understand how this diversity arose, Oscar Agertz will investigate how massive stars influence the dynamics of a galaxy, conducting these experiments using simulations in supercomputers.

John Fitzpatrick. Foto: Markus Marcetic/Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse/Kungl. Vetenskapsakadem

Are animals’ sexual traits governed by how they reproduce?

Why haven’t mammals developed the same beautiful colours as birds – even though mammals also need to attract a partner in order to reproduce? Wallenberg Academy Fellow John Fitzpatrick will investigate how animals’ traits and sexual behaviours have been affected by evolutionary transitions from one method of reproduction to another.

Sarah Greenwood. Foto: Markus Marcetic/Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse/Kungl. Vetenskapsakademi

How does a warmer climate affect marine ice sheets?

Wallenberg Academy Fellow Sarah Greenwood will study how ice sheets that flow into the sea are affected by the surrounding environment. One important aim is to make better predictions of how the Greenland and Antarctic marine ice sheets will react as the climate gets warmer.

Abraham Mendoza. Foto: Markus Marcetic/Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse/Kungl. Vetenskapsakademi

More effective and environmentally-friendly methods for chemical synthesis

Chemical synthesis of everything from pharmaceuticals to new materials often requires the use of toxic solvents and metals. Wallenberg Academy Fellow Abraham Mendoza will expand the chemists’ toolbox with more sustainable methods. Inspired by nature, he uses the energy of light to control and catalyzecatalyse environmentally friendly chemical reactions.

Jonas Olofsson. Foto: Markus Marcetic/Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse/Kungl. Vetenskapsakademie

How does the brain store olfactory memories?

Researchers’ knowledge of how the brain stores memories primarily comes from studies of visual impressions. Wallenberg Academy Fellow Jonas Olofsson will investigate how we store olfactory memories. A reduced ability to perceive smells may be an early indication of Alzheimer’s disease and there are indications that olfactory training can improve memory.