Accomodation

Accomodation

A field station with history

The laboratory on Askö was originally a privately owned farm but since 1961 it belongs to Stockholm University. Even if it has been rebuilt in several steps to suit its new purpose, there is still a feeling of old archipelago living. All buildings have been preserved as much as possible and are still called their original names; Tvättstugan (The Laundy house), Stallet (The Stable) and Gamla båthuset (The Old Boat House). The main house is the most transformed building as it is nowadays used as dining hall and called Mässen (The kitchen).

The environment around the laboratory invites you to explore and enjoy the unique Swedish archipelago. The island is big though, so bring a map if you intend to walk or bike far. If the conditions are right you can find both berries and mushrooms near the station, and off course we provide a newly renovated sauna. The water around the well protected bay where the station is situated is excellent for excursions and contain the most common brackish water ecosystems.

Lodging

Lodging

We provide simple bedrooms to accommodate about 40 people at the same time. Most of the rooms are in the main building, and some are in the smaller houses.

Cuisine

Cuisine

Most courses and groups cook together in the main kitchen. Some of the smaller buildings have their own cooking possibilities.

Bastubad i lugn Askövik

Spare time

Askö includes almost all the best things Swedish nature has to offer and can be enjoyed all year around. There are a lot of things to do to get a break from research and work.

Contact Askö

Phone: +46-8-5537 85 80
E-mail: asko.ostersjocentrum@su.se

Adress:
Askölaboratoriet
619 92 Trosa

A cheap deal!

In 1960 the owner of the farm on Askö left his home for good. Professor Lars Silén at Stockholm University overtook the property one year later. Each year 500 SEK was payed to the National Property Board which made the last farm on Askö available to research.

Nowadays the rent is standard high and is financed through the Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.