Students from all over the world

Julia is a motivated and extroverted girl with a huge interest in the world. She likes sports, nature, D.I.Y. and music. Julia likes to go on adventures and get to know the world from a different perspective.

"Unfortunately, I have not been outside of Europe until now but I’ve met a bunch of very cool people from over 20 different countries and I am sure that I will visit a few of them in the next years! Also, I enjoy talking and discussing and spending time with friends. Probably it is more difficult to make friends with a Swedish person but if you show them that you care about them and enjoy having "fika" with them, I am sure you will find friends for life here", says Julia.

Studies in Sweden

Julia is currently in her second year of a three-year-program to become a primary school teacher for children between 6 and 10 years of age in all subjects. She studied her second year in Sweden at Stockholm University. This semester, Julia is taking a history course about influential Swedish personalities and a course to improve her scientific writing skills in English. In May and June she will have a teacher-training internship with 9 to 12 year-olds in a (hopefullly bilingual) Swedish school. Last semester she visited a "gymnasiet" (high-school), "fritidshem" (afternoon care) and "parklek" (a supervised playground), and she had a two-week internship at a "förskola" (pre-school).

"I want to visit several Swedish elementary schools this semester to see different forms of organization. My exams are mostly written assignments or presentations in the seminars."

Julia has noticed that everyone accepts being called by his or her first name as a student. Moreover, she thinks that students are expected to organize more things on their own in Sweden than in Austria. Students have to work in groups in order to support each other and to grow together.

"The courses are much more comprehensive and structured in a different way than my courses at home. The differences in the schooling systems are very interesting for me and I appreciate the Swedish system a lot," says Julia.

Julia’s piece of advice

"First, it is good to know that everyone can speak English very well. You should be prepared to walk a lot here, since the public transport works really well and you can get nearly anywhere without a car. Also, the ticket for students is quite expensive and so you should use it as often as you can. The ticket is also valid for trains, trams and ferries and so you can see a lot without spending money additionally."

"Furthermore, Sweden has a lot of nature and water. It is beautiful and relaxing to walk around and enjoy outdoor-life. You will meet a lot of Swedish people who had the same idea to go out in the nature and get as much sun-rays as possible. There are plenty of things to do such as cinemas, tourist places, shopping streets, impressive buildings, parks, museums, cafes, clubs. But for me personally, I love to go to the ice-hockey matches of Djurgården and cheer for the team in Hovet stadion!"