Environment & Sustainability Manager of Temes, Vasilis Karakousis; PR & Online Marketing Manager, Valia Vanezi, and Professors Stefan Nordlund and Johan Kleman from Stockholm University took part in the ceremonial inauguration of the research station in October 2012.
Environment & Sustainability Manager of Temes, Vasilis Karakousis; PR & Online Marketing Manager, Valia Vanezi, and Professors Stefan Nordlund and Johan Kleman from Stockholm University took part in the ceremonial inauguration of the research station in October 2012.
 

The Greek ecotourism company Temes wanted to understand its surroundings and develop its hotel operations in a sustainable fashion. Stockholm University has broad expertise in issues pertaining to climate and the environment, but has previously not been that active in the Mediterranean.

“The global changes are so noticeable in the Mediterranean with hotter and drier summers. When we approached Temes, our climate expertise was exactly what they needed”, says Johan Kleman, professor at Stockholm University and one of the founders of NEO, the Navarino Environmental Observatory.

This research collaboration enables the development of knowledge of past as well as future environmental change.
 
Achilles Constantakopoulos, Managing Director of Temes, is enthusiastic about his company’s role in the collaboration.
 
“We hope to be able to contribute to the efforts made to deal with climate change in time.”
The NEO research station was funded by Temes and is located on company land. Researchers and students from Sweden, Greece and the rest of the world go there to study environmental and climate issues from different perspectives. Located in the same area is the Navarino Natura Hall, an interactive exhibition centre which pedagogically informs school children and hotel visitors about nature in the area.
 
The research at NEO covers environmental change related to air, water and land. For example, researchers study growth rings of ancient trees, dripstones in deep caves, and coastal erosion – all in order to understand the area’s current and historical climate. They study how the region’s groundwater level and water quality are affected by changes in the climate, sea level, and land use, and the results are used to develop methods for sustainable management of the region’s water supply.
 
“The NEO collaboration is going to be a very important part of Stockholm University’s climate research”, says Karin Holmgren, professor at Stockholm University and Director of NEO.
”We have already started our measurements of particles in the atmosphere. There will be a long series of measurements that will be used to make more reliable climate predictions.”