One project is called “Creative Industries Cultural Economy Production Network”, CICERONE, and will explore the growing relationship between culture and economy.

Responsible researchers at Stockholm University are Dominic Power, Professor, and Thomas Borén, Associate Professor, both at the Department of Human Geography.

“Cultural and Creative Industries contributes significantly to the European economy but we know little about the production networks involved or how they are embedded in local and regional contexts,” says Dominic Power. “The project will thus contribute to a grounded understanding of how, what and where value is created and how it contributes to local development, sustainability and social cohesion, and how policy could support that,” says Thomas Borén.

The CICERONE project will last for four years and has a total budget of 2 999 446.25 euros. Stockholm University is the fourth largest partner financially with 311,746.25 euros in funds granted. The project is coordinated by the University of Amsterdam.

The second project that is awarded funding is “Technological inquality – understanding the relation between recent technological innovations and social inequalities”, TECHNEQUALITY. The project will, among other things, investigate how inequality in society is affected by technological development.

“The importance of such changes is still poorly analyzed, and it is therefore unclear how authorities should best respond,” says Tomas Korpi, professor at the Institute for Social Research (SOFI), who is the principal Swedish investigator for the project.

“Our contribution will mainly focus on the importance of different forms of education for social mobility in the labor market,” says Tomas Korpi.

The project will last for three years and has a total budget of 2 999 136.25 euros. Stockholm University is the fourth largest partner financially with 320,000 euros in funds granted. The project is coordinated by Maastricht University.