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Rasmus RodineliussenPhD student

About me

This Ph.D. project will address the issue of marine debris from a Swedish European context focusing on the relationship between knowledge and social practices resulting in marine debris. It will be an ethnography of Swedish divers who will clean lakes and waters around Stockholm from marine debris. Their work entails both communicating about the issue to other divers and local communities on land, and to practically showing other divers how to safely and effectively remove and collect marine debris while underwater. 

Marine debris is an issue in Sweden just as in any other country. By doing cleanups in Sweden and documenting the trash collected these divers intend to make this explicit for the Swedish population, emphasizing that Swedes too must change their social practices. The Swedish divers have been doing cleanups earlier, but without government support, it was not economically and logistically possible to do it large scale. In the current policy environment that favors actions towards the removal of marine debris, based on the UN directive, they wish to give it another try. Divers as a social group are important in this context due to their ability to directly remove marine debris, they are also the only humans roaming the underwater world on a regular basis and are therefore the most frequent observers of debris in the water. Moreover, divers are a global community present close to everywhere in the world. Thus, by engaging divers, it is possible to work against marine debris globally.

During fieldwork in Brazil for my master’s thesis in social anthropology, I have begun to develop theoretical and ethnographic tools to work with divers in and out of the water (Rodineliussen 2017). When diving ethnography is made underwater, this opens up new possibilities but also creates new constraints on the practice of participant-observation.

On top of my current research project am I interested in experimental takes on ethnographic methods, and I am therefore a member of the EASA network COLLEEX. I do also hold a long-going interest in migration and refugee studies.

Publications

2022

Rodineliussen, R. (2022). Online Interviews and Observation as a Method of Researching in a War Zone: The Syrian Revolution. SAGE Doing Research Online.

Rodineliussen, R. (2022). Book Review. "To Hear and Feel the Noise through the Glitch." Anthropology Book Forum. Vol. 8. No. 1.

Rodineliussen, R. (2022). Book Review. Colonial, Decolonial, Anticolonial–the How in Doing Science. In Anthropology Book Forum. Vol. 8, No. 1.

2021

Rodineliussen, R. (2021). Caring for Water: Underwater Waste, Trash Diving, and Publicity in Stockholm. kritisk etnografi: Swedish Journal of Anthropology4(2), 73-92.

 

Rodineliussen, R. (2021). Book Review. Normal Water. In Anthropology Book Forum(Vol. 7, No. 1).

 

2020

Rodineliussen, R. (2020). Movie Review. Water is Life. In Anthropology Book Forum (Vol. 6, No. 1).

 

Rodineliussen, R. (2020). Book Review. Publishing From Your Doctoral Thesis. The Independent Scholar.

 

2019

Rodineliussen, R. (2019). Organising the Syrian revolution—student activism through Facebook. Visual studies34(3), 239-251.

 

Rodineliussen, R. (2019[2017]). Visual Methods to Study the Underwater World. Scuba Divers and a Sensorial Experience of Water. Anthrovision. Vaneasa Online Journal, (5.2).

 

Rodineliussen, R. (2019). Ethnographic Exploration of a Sensorial Underwater World. Irish Journal of Anthropology Vol22, 1.

 

Rodineliussen, R., & Emmerich, N. (2019). Syrian Refugee Stories of Torture: Ethical Dilemmas for Interviews and Writing. SAGE Publications Ltd.

 

Rodineliussen, R. 2019. Where did the Oxygen go? Working to save the Baltic Sea. Weather Matters hub, RAI. http://www.weathermatters.net/perspectives#/where-did-all-the-oxygen-go/

 

2017

Rodineliussen, R. (2017). Divers Engaging Policy—Practices of Making Water. Master thesis. 

 

2016

Rodineliussen, R. (2016). Syria to Sweden: Refugee Stories. Anthropology Now8(1), 37-45.

 

Rodineliussen, R. (2016). Anthropologists, the co-creators of stories. Student Anthropologist5(1), 46-53.

 

Rodineliussen, R. (2016). Book Review. Illegality, Inc.: Clandestine Migration and the Business of Bordering Europe, Ruben Andersson. Field Notes: A Journal of Collegiate Anthropology8(1), 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publications

2021

  • Rodineliussen, R. 2021. Book Review: Pollution Is Colonialism. By Max Liboiron. Durham and London: Duke University Press. Anthropology Book Forum. https://anthrobookforum.americananthro.org/?book-review=colonial-decolonial-anticolonial-the-how-in-doing-science

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  • 2020

    2019

    2018

    2017

    • Rodineliussen, R. 2017b. Experimenting with Stories. Part of a thematic thread on experimental approaches to ethnography on behalf of Colleex, a European Association of Social Anthropologist network, allegralaboratory.net
    • Rodineliussen, R. 2017a. Divers Engaging Policy—Practices of Making Water. Master’s thesis. Stockholm University and Sida.

    2016

    • Rodineliussen, R. 2016c. Anthropologists, the Co-Creators of Stories. Student Anthropologist, the official e-journal of NASA, part of the American Anthropological Association.
    • Rodineliussen, R. 2016b. (Book Review, published in FieldNotes vol. 8:1): Illegality, Inc.: Clandestine Migration and the Business of Bordering Europe. Ruben Andersson. Oakland: University of California Press, 2014.
    • Rodineliussen, R. 2016a. Syria to Sweden: Refugee Stories. Anthropology Now. Vol. 8:1: 37–45.

    2014

    • Rodineliussen, R. 2014. We are Young. The Nanyang Chronicles. April. Singapore.

    Media

    2018







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