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Research news & press releases

  • New observations shed light on most powerful explosions in the Universe 2019-11-21 Gamma-ray bursts arise from the most powerful explosions in the known Universe, and are linked to the birth of a black hole. New observations reveal that they are even more powerful than expected, and emit radiation at higher energies than previously known.
  • Nine researchers at Stockholm University among the world’s most cited 2019-11-20 The Web of Science Group recently published its prestigious annual list of the world’s most cited and influential researchers. Nine researchers from Stockholm University have been named on the 2019 Highly Cited Researchers list.
  • New technique enables fine mapping of closely related cells in situ 2019-11-20 SciLifeLab researchers have developed a new technique called “Probabilistic cell typing by in situ sequencing” or pciSeq. The new technique can identify cell types as well as determine their spatial location in a much more efficient way than previous methods.
  • A small rabbitfish caught using mosquito nets. Photo: Benjamin L Jones. Mosquito nets: Are they catching more fishes than insects? 2019-11-11 Mosquito nets designed to prevent malaria transmission are used for fishing which may devastate tropical coastal ecosystems, according to a new scientific study.
  • En allt större del av planeten används nu för att producera mat, material och bränsle. Det skapa nya globala risker, skriver forskare från SRC i Nature. Foto: N. Ryrholm/Azote An altered planetary anatomy 2019-11-07 Humans have transformed much of the planet to produce more and more food, fibre and fuel, now we need to radically transform this global production ecosystem.
  • Christina Rudén, professor of toxicology at Stockholm University, has investigated how humans are exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals. Photo: Jens Lasthein More stringent regulations on chemical mixtures 2019-11-08 Throughout life, humans are exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals of varying degrees of harmfulness. How does that affect us? Whose responsibility is this? Christina Rudén, professor of toxicology, was appointed by the government to investigate this matter.
  • 2020 winners of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology 2019-11-05 The 2020 Stockholm Prize in Criminology lauds Philip J. Cook, Duke University and Franklin E. Zimring, University of California at Berkeley for their evidence-based explanations of gun policy effects.
  • Stockholm is very beautiful and it is both busy and quiet according to Robert Daniels. Photo: Niklas Björling Eminent research on flu antigens took Robert Daniels back to USA 2019-10-24 Intellectual freedom and the opportunity to start his own research group once lured Robert Daniels to Stockholm University. After nine years of eminent academic research, he landed a prestigious job in the US. Still, his focus is the same: to apply basic membrane protein folding principles to modernize and improve the antigens in seasonal influenza vaccines.
  • Computer simulation of a merger of two stars SEK 132 million awarded to research projects at Stockholm University 2019-10-23 The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has awarded research grants to four projects at Stockholm University. In total, 20 projects receive grants of SEK 640 million.
  • Graphene, photo: Ktsimage/Mostphotos Understanding dynamic processes in quantum matter 2019-10-21 In quantum technology, which is predicted to take over from today’s silicon-based electronics, the possibilities are endless
  • Ionic liquids have many promising, but as yet unexplored, possibilities Ionic liquids can help in the production of more effective medicines 2019-10-21 Project to investigate if ionic liquids could replace organic solvents, thus creating completely new opportunities for the production of medicines
  • Respiratory supercomplex from Mycobacterium smegmatis Finding out more about the cell’s energy factories 2019-10-21 New opportunities for the development of drugs against tuberculosis and an increased understanding of how the cell’s energy factory works.
  • Computer simulation of a merger of two stars Gravitational radiation can give new answers about elements and the expansion of the universe 2019-10-21 Cosmic collisions between compact stars create both gravitational radiation and normal light. The aim of the project “Gravity meets light” is to understand more about these collisions and the radiation that they create.
  • Xbrane Biopharma has about 30 employees and is located in Solna north of Stockholm. Photo: XBrane Biopharma A Rocky Road Decade – From Promising Lab Data to Growing Biopharma Firm 2019-10-18 Xbrane Biopharma is a promising biotechnology company that started at Stockholm University. If everything goes as planned, the company’s first drug will be approved in 2021.
  • Foto: J Kelly Brito/Unsplash Workshop: Data Carpentry 2019-10-14 In collaboration with Karolinska Institute and KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm Trio), Stockholm University offers a workshop in Data Carpentry – handling of data with various software tools.
  • Read Svenska Dagbladet Online 2019-10-11 As a member of staff, researcher or student at Stockholm University, you can now read Svenska Dagbladet online wherever you are.
  • Physicists have found a way to “hear” dark matter 2019-10-09 Physicists at Stockholm University and the Max Planck Institute for Physics have turned to plasmas in a proposal that could revolutionise the search for the elusive dark matter.
  • Labföreståndaren Elin Allzén demonstrerar SUBICs röntgenmikroskop för prinsessan Sofia och prins Carl Philip. Foto: Lena Katarina Johansson/Stockholms universitet. Royal visit at dyslexia and brain symposium 2019-10-04 Keynote speaker was Usha Goswami, professor of neuroscience, Cambridge University. Prince Carl Philip and Princess Sofia of Sweden attended the symposium and made a study visit at the research centre.
  • Designing on a nanoscale for a more sustainable society 2019-09-30 Using mainly forest waste as raw material and a 3D printer, Aji Mathew works in materials designs – at the smallest level. The result: bio-based nanomaterials with tailor-made properties.
  • ERC grant to Stockholm University researcher 2019-09-19 Markus Kowalewski at the Department of Physics at Stockholm University has received a grant of just over € 1.48 million from the European Research Council
  • Time for corporate biosphere stewardship 2019-09-17 A handful of transnational corporations hold enough power to accelerate (or hinder) transformations towards sustainability, a study from Stockholm Resilience Centre says.
  • Foto: Eva Dalin The President awards gold medals 2019-09-17 The President has decided to award the Stockholm University Gold Medal in the 8th size to three people who have contributed to university activities in various ways.
  • Foto: Nobel Prize Museum Live streaming of The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019-09-13 The announcement of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry is live streamed in the Frescati Library Wednesday 9th October 11.45 a.m. Welcome!
  • Gunnar von Heijne to receive 2020 Anatrace Membrane Protein Award 2019-09-09 Gunnar von Heijne, Professor of theoretical chemistry at Stockholm University and Director of the SciLifeLab National Cryo-EM Facility, has been named the recipient of the The Biophysical Society’s 2020 Anatrace Membrane Protein Award.
  • Southern peak of Kebnekaise on September 3rd, photo: Gunhild Rosqvist Southern peak of Kebnekaise now stands one metre below the northern peak 2019-09-05 The southern peak now stands at 2095.6 metres, 1.2 metres below the northern peak at 2096.8 metres.
  • Pontus Strimling. Foto: Sara Moritz. New scientific model can predict moral and political development 2019-08-26 How come today’s conservatives are more liberal than yesterday’s liberals? Why has the public opinion in large parts of the world shifted so rapidly in favour of gay and lesbian rights, but been virtually unchanged on other contested issues such as abortion rights? A study from a Swedish team of researchers recently published in the social science journal Nature Human Behaviour answers several critical questions on how public opinion changes on moral issues. They have created a scientific model that can predict public opinion changes on moral issues.
  • Switching on the Atlantic heat pump 2019-08-22 34 million years ago the warm ‘greenhouse climate’ of the dinosaur age ended and the colder ‘icehouse climate’ of today commenced. Antarctica glaciated first and geological data imply that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, the global ocean conveyor belt of heat and nutrients that today helps keep Europe warm, also started at this time. Why exactly, has remained a mystery.
  • Subscription to RefWorks terminates at year end – save your references 2019-08-20 Stockholm University Library will end the subscription to the reference management program RefWorks December 31, 2019.
  • Contribution to research on Alzheimer’s disease 2019-08-20 Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. The disease currently lacks both prevention measures and cure. In a research project that has been awarded a grant from Bright Focus Foundation (BFF) the researchers will find out if there is a link between the disease and a specific liver-generated profile in the blood.
  • Stockholm University ranks 73 in the world 2019-08-19 Stockholm University is ranked at place 73 in the latest edition of the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2019.
  • Stockholm ranked among world’s top 50 Student Cities 2019-08-07 Which city is best in the world for studying abroad? Stockholm is ranked as number 37 according to QS Best Student Cities 2019.
  • SciLifeLab, Stockholm University and AstraZeneca use cryo-EM to advance biomedicine 2019-08-02 SciLifeLab Fellow Alexey Amunts and his team in collaboration with AstraZeneca unravel the molecular details of the extracellular region of the receptor tyrosine kinase RET involved in cell signalling.
  •  RV Sonne, Credit: University of Hamburg / LDF/J.Peters Where do microplastics go in the world’s oceans? 2019-07-05 Two PhD students at Stockholm University have participated in a scientific cruise from Canada to Singapore to understand how microplastics behave in the water and in marine food webs.
  • Rektorerna Sigrid Karlsson, KTH, Astrid Söderbergh Widding, SU, och Olle Petter Ottersen, KTH. Presidents present Stockholm trio university alliance 2019-07-02 The presidents of Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University presented the "Stockholm trio" university alliance during the Swedish "political week".
  • 2019 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) SU ninth in the world within Geography 2019-07-02 Geography at Stockholm University is ranked nine in the world. Environmental Sciences & Engineering and Atmospheric Science at Stockholm University are also among the top 25 in the world.
  • University collaboration receives EU grant 2019-07-02 The university alliance CIVIS, consisting of Stockholm University and seven other European universities, is one of seventeen pilot projects selected for funding from the European Commission.
  • Open Access agreement with Springer Nature 2019-10-11 Researchers at Stockholm University can publish open access without any charges in more than 500 journals from Springer Nature.
  • Large research grant to develop green chemistry 2019-06-24 Financier Mistra and industry partners are investing SEK 100 million in the research program SAFECHEM, which aims to create a sustainable chemicals industry and reduce exposure to hazardous substances.
  • Bats, Image by Jens Rydell (http://www.fladdermus.net/naturfoto/) Report bat sightings in citizen science project 2019-07-02 In a new citizen science project the general public across Sweden can help researchers find bat roosts
  • Stockholm University ranks 191 in QS ranking 2019-07-02 Stockholm University is at place 191 in the QS World University Ranking 2020 presented on 19 June.
  • En route to Greenland to drill the ice 2019-06-05 Professor Margareta Hansson is currently in Greenland to oversee the research work in an ice core project where drilling is being performed in a rapidly flowing ice stream.
  • Stockholm University at top position regarding Open Access publications 2019-05-27 The CWTS Leiden Ranking 2019 (2014–2017) shows that Stockholm University is at the top position amongst Swedish universities.
  • The expedition will study the floating parts of glaciers in northwestern Greenland. Photo: Martin Jakobsson Polar expedition to shed light on Greenlandic glacier 2019-07-25 In august, a research expedition on icebreaker Oden departs for Ryder glacier. The expedition will investigate the connection between climate change and glaciers, but also how Greenland was colonised.
  • Photo: Niklas Björling Versatile solvents offer hope for greener chemistry 2019-05-17 For Professor Anja Mudring and other chemists, ionic liquids present an opportunity to contribute to a more sustainable society.
  • New microscope finally in place 2019-05-20 After almost five years and major renovations in the Arrhenius Laboratory, the University’s new electron microscope is finally in place.
  • Leiden Ranking 2019 2019-05-17 In the middle of May CWTS Leiden University presented the Leiden Ranking 2019. The ranking measures the scientific performance of more than 950 major universities worldwide.
  • One of the analyzed chewing gums, photo: Natalija Kashuba Chewing gums reveal the oldest Scandinavian human DNA 2019-05-16 The first humans who settled in Scandinavia more than 10,000 years ago left their DNA behind in ancient chewing gums, which are masticated lumps made from birch bark pitch.
  • Kolyma river, Photo: Jorien Vonk/Stockholm University Clues of carbon release from thawing permafrost found in Arctic rivers 2019-05-09 Arctic rivers may hold vital clues to the accelerated release of carbon stored in Arctic permafrost. This is shown in new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
  • Scientists coordinate a new Horizon 2020 project on how air pollution affects climate 2019-05-08 The project ”Constrained aerosol forcing for improved climate projections”, or FORCeS, will contribute to more precise climate projections by reducing the uncertainty on how particles in the air affect climate.
  • HRH Crown Princess Victoria and President Pavlopoulos attend climate seminar 2019-05-07 Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden and the Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos attended a seminar in Athens arranged by Stockholm University’s field station NEO.
  • A man fishing in Bogoria lake, Photo: Matthieu Gallet/Mostphotos Breaking bread with rivals leads to more fish on coral reefs 2019-05-03 Cooperation is key to most successful endeavours. And, scientists find, when fishers cooperate with their fiercest competitors this can improve fish stocks on coral reefs.
  • XENON1T installation in the underground hall of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The three story building houses various auxiliary systems. The cryostat containing the LXeTPC is located inside the large water tank next to the building. Photo by Roberto Corrieri and Patrick De Perio.” The extreme of rarity 2019-04-30 OKC researchers helped reveal the rarest nuclear reaction now known to mankind. To observe this ultra-rare process, XENON1T watched a tonne of ultra-pure liquid xenon for a year. The experiment was featured on the cover of the scientific journal 'Nature'
  • Meet researcher Mitch Downey who joined Stockholm University and moved to Stockholm. "I am amazed to live in such an amazing place!" 2019-05-17 Meet researcher Mitch Downey at IIES who joined Stockholm University and moved to Sweden from the United States.
  • Baltic Sea research in focus at Skansen 2019-04-23 The Skansen Baltic Sea Knowledge Centre, the Baltic Sea Science Centre, has been inaugurated by Crown Princess Victoria. Researchers at Stockholm University have a central role in this effort to raise awareness of challenges in the Baltic.
  • Three researchers receive EU-funding from MSCA 2019-04-12 Three researchers at Stockholm University have been awarded funding within Marie Skłodowska Curie Individual Fellowships (MSCA-IF), which is the EU’s Research Mobility Program. The projects are in the fields of environmental science, astronomy and medieval history.
  • Seven new Honorary Doctorates at Stockholm University 2019 2019-04-11 Stockholm University has chosen this year’s honorary doctors, all of whom have contributed in distinctive ways to the University’s activities in research and education. The new honorary doctors are Johan Eriksson, Eva Dahlman, Kajsa Öberg Lindsten, Axel van den Berg, Elizabeth Churchill, Nora Underwood and Frances Westley.
  • Initiative in environmental human sciences 2019-04-04 Climate refugees, climate change in fiction and protest movements. These are topics that will be studied in environmental human sciences.
  • Vy över Stockholms universitet, Foto: Clément Morin/Stockholms universitet Wallenberg grant to research the origins of geometric objects 2019-03-28 Associate Professor Wushi Goldring will receive funding from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation to recruit an international researcher for a postdoctoral position at the Department of Mathematics, Stockholm University.
  • Xiaodong Zou, Photo: Yi Luo/Stockholms universitet Wallenberg Scholar grant awarded for analyzing biomolecule structures 2019-03-28 Xiaodong Zou, professor in Structural Chemistry at Stockholm University, is one of 22 Wallenberg Scholar grant receivers 2019. The researchers, among the most prominent in Sweden, are each awarded a 18 million SEK five year grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.
  • New solution-oriented course for counteracting climate change 2019-03-27 With the new, interdisciplinary course “Climate Change Solutions” that starts this autumn, Stockholm University wants to contribute to solutions to the climate crisis.
  • Oceans are major sources of highly fluorinated chemicals into the air 2019-03-26 Sea spray may be a major source of highly fluorinated chemicals to the atmosphere contradicting the view that oceans act only as sinks for these persistent pollutants, shows a new study by researchers from the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES) at Stockholm University published in the journal Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts.
  • Health risks associated with mixtures of man-made chemicals are underestimated 2019-03-26 The cocktail of man-made chemicals that we are exposed to daily is a health risk which current regulations and risk assessment overlook. This is the conclusion of the EU Horizon 2020 EDC-MixRisk project.
  • King Carl XVI Gustaf, Photo: Niklas Björling/SU Royal visit at Arctic lecture 2019-03-13 Derek Muir, holder of the King Carl XVI Gustaf Visiting Professorship in Environmental Science at Stockholm University, gave his introductory lecture on March 13th.
  • Research on creative networks and technological inequality receives funding 2019-03-11 What makes some cites so creative? And what does the new technology mean for the equality in society? Stockholm University has been granted funding for two new EU projects within the Horizon 2020 framework program.
  • Isbrytaren Oden under den svensk-amerikanska expeditionen Arctic Ocean 2018. Foto: Jan-Ola Olofsson Arctic Avenue: strategic cooperation between Stockholm and Helsinki 2019-03-07 The two universities have decided to launch a new research spearhead in Arctic research called Arctic Avenue.
  • New research makes non-rechargeable batteries rechargeable 2019-02-28 Non-rechargeable alkaline batteries commonly use zinc and manganese dioxide. Through a modification of the manganese dioxide, researchers can now recharge non-rechargeable alkaline batteries.
  • Researchers receive EU funding within MSCA 2019-02-11 Researchers at Stockholm University are awarded funding within Marie Skłodowska Curie (MSCA), which is the EU Research Mobility Program. The project is in the field of environmental science.
  • Research on global approaches to local resilience is funded within Horizon 2020 2019-02-07 How can we create community resilience when disaster strikes? That is the topic for a research project funded within Horizon 2020.
  • How to get articles from Elsevier 2019-02-07 Information for researchers and students at Stockholm University on how to get articles from Elsevier after the cancelled agreement.
  • Rain-repelling fluorochemicals in outdoor clothing are unnecessary 2019-01-31 Waterproof clothing using highly fluorinated chemicals are over-engineered for consumers, building in unnecessary repellency to oil and other stains, when only repellency to water is required. The researchers say effective alternatives, that are better for the environment, are readily available.
  • "We have a lot of top scientists and talented students working together" 2019-02-12 Meet Cheuk-Wai Tai who is an researcher at the Department of Environmental and Materials Chemistry and responsible for the Electron Microscopy Center.
  • "I'm so curious" says researcher Angela Adamo 2019-04-25 Meet Angela Adamo, a researcher at the Department of Astronomy at Stockholm University, who shares her story about her journey from Italy to living in Stockholm and working at Stockholm University.
  • Shaking atoms and watching them dance at a higher tempo 2019-01-21 By shaking atoms and looking at their dance, one can control and understand the properties of matter in a new way, a new study shows.
  • Discuss Plan S with President Astrid Söderbergh Widding 2019-01-21 The EU initiative Plan S was launched in September this year and in order to be able to conduct an open dialogue on a complex issue, Stockholm University arranges a seminar on 28 January.
  • Diet, food production must radically change to avoid catastrophic damage 2019-01-18 We can feed 10 billion people by 2050 with a healthy and sustainable diet, but it requires new eating habits, improved food production, and reduced food waste.
  • Structure of the engineered botulinum neurotoxin bound to its human receptor. An engineered botulinum toxin with improved medicinal potential 2019-01-17 New cooperation between Stockholm University, Harvard Medical School and Ipsen Bioinnovation reveals molecular mechanisms in engineered botulinum toxin.
  • Structure of the respiratory chain supercomplex, a key enzyme for cellular energy conversion. New findings on respiratory supercomplexes 2019-01-02 A team from Stockholm University has determined the architecture of an assembly of respiratory chain complexes, revealing in near-atomic detail how energy conversion occurs and is organized.
  • Professor Dag Noréus och doktor Yang Shen. Foto: Niklas Björling. Swedish research multiplies the life of rechargeable NiMH batteries 2018-12-20 Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method to multiply the lifespan of nickel-metal hydride batteries, giving them great many more charging cycles without losing capacity.
  • Daniela Guasconi och David Åhlén, forskningsassistenter för Insect Biome Atlas på Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, visar volontären Amanda Bråkenheim Brising (mitten) var fällorna är placerade. Foto: Niklas Björling Insects of Sweden and Madagascar to be surveyed 2018-12-20 A research project was launched this autumn that will survey the insects of Sweden and Madagascar. The project is made possible thanks to a large number of volunteers who are helping to empty the insect traps.
  • Researcher at Department of Physics receives funding from Swedish Foundations’ Starting Grant 2018-12-19
  • Royal Environmental Professor for Stockholm University 2018-12-20 For 2019/20, the board of the King Carl XVI Gustaf 50th Anniversary Fund for Science, Technology and the Environment has appointed Paul Anastas as the 24th holder of the King Carl XVI Gustaf Professorship in Environmental Science.
  • Feedback on the implementation of Plan S 2018-12-29 Provide your feedback on the guide on how to implement Plan S, the EU initiative that aims towards 100% open access for all scientific publications that result from public funding.
  • Photo: Michael Erhardsson/Mostphotos Our choices as employees may lead to workplace segregation 2018-12-18 A new study from Stockholm University and the Institute of Futures Studies shows that our own choices as employees may increase workplace segregation.
  • Who will dare to publish if the corporations sue? 2018-12-14 What should researchers do who have controversial material and are threatened with lawsuits if they publish their results in a scientific journal?
  • Stress Research Institute to be integrated into the Department of Psychology 2018-12-14 The University Board has decided that the Stress Research Institute (SFI) will become a part of the Department of Psychology from 1 January 2020.
  • Polar Bear, Photo: Mostphotos New halogenated contaminants found in polar bears 2018-12-13 A team of scientists has used a new method to measure chemical contaminants in polar bears. Doing this they found a large variety of new chlorinated and fluorinated substances.
  • Research on marine protected areas receives contribution 2018-12-11 The Swedish Research Council has granted research project grants for development research for 2018. At Stockholm University, support is given for a research project concerning marine protected areas in Tanzania and Mexico.
  • Three scientists are granted funds for sustainability and resilience 2018-12-11 The Swedish Research Council has decided on the applications to be awarded in the field of “Sustainability and resilience – tackling consequences of climate and environmental changes 2018”. Three researchers at Stockholm University can share more than 16 million SEK.
  • Seals by the water, Photo: Jan Kansanen/Mostphotos Increasing seal population will not harm largest fish stocks in the Baltic 2018-12-08 Seals feeding on fish does not decrease fish stocks of Baltic cod, herring and sprat the most – climate change, nutrient load and fisheries do.
  • Eight researchers at Stockholm University among the most cited 2018-12-05 In the end of November, the annual list “Highly Cited Researcher-2018” was published. World class researchers are selected for their exceptional research performance and significant influence. This year, eight researchers from Stockholm University are on the list.
  • A young orangutang at Tanjung Puting National park, southern Borneo. ©Johan Lind/N Great apes and ravens plan without thinking 2018-12-20 Planning and self control in animals do not require human-like mental capacities, according to a study from Stockholm University.
  • Does winning the lottery make you happier? 2018-11-23 We asked Professor Erik Lindqvist, professor of Economics at SOFI, Stockholm University on his recent study on winning the lottery and life satisfaction.
  • Funding to develop sustainable aviation fuel 2018-11-23 The project ”Aviation fuel from lignin” at the Department of Organic Chemistry, Stockholm University, has received 4,7 million SEK from Energimyndigheten, Swedish Energy Agency.
  • Why is it good to sleep in on weekends? 2018-11-19 We asked Professor Torbjörn Åkerstedt of the Stress Research Institute at Stockholm University on his recent study related to sleep duration and mortality.
  • New inflammation inhibitor discovered 2018-11-19 A multidisciplinary team of researchers from four universities has developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action.
  • 100 years since the first student exchange with China 2018-11-16 A 100 years ago Stockholm University began its first international student exchanges with China. The exchange was part of the university’s increasing internationalisation at the time.
  • Mycoplasma bacterias sneaking past our line of defense 2018-11-05 New research reveals that Mycoplasma pathogens make DNA in a unique way that may protect them from our immune response. The study is published in the scientific journal Nature.
  • Åsa Wikforss. Foto: Christer Sturmark Programme on knowledge resistance awarded SEK 50.4 million 2018-10-23 Åsa Wikforss, professor of philosophy at the Department of Philosophy is awarded SEK 50.4 million for the programme “Knowledge Resistance: Causes, Consequences and Cures”.
  • "Unselfish people are the winners" – Kimmo Eriksson on unselfishness 2018-11-09 Kimmo Eriksson talks about a new study that shows that unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries.
  • Foto: Paul Bentzen Small-brained female guppies aren’t drawn to attractive males 2018-10-10 Female guppies with smaller brains can distinguish attractive males, but they don’t recognise them as being more appealing or choose to mate with them
  • EU funding to HERA-project 2018-10-05 The project ”Integrating Environment and Health Research: a Vision for the EU” (HERA), where Stockholm University is one of the partners, has been granted EU funding.
  • Hiranya Peiris, Photo: Serena Nobili/Oskar Klein Centre Five major research grants to Stockholm University 2018-10-05 The projects span research into the creation of mitochondrial ribosomes – which can give new tools against certain types of cancer – to studying and learning more about the fundamental physical nature of dark matter and dark energy.
  • Broad genetic variation on the Pontic-Caspian Steppe 2018-10-04 The genetic variation within the Scythian nomad group is so broad that it must be explained with the group assimilating people it came in contact with. This is shown in a new study on Bronze and Iron Age genetics of the Pontic-Caspian Steppe, situated in the Black Sea region.
  • Inauguration and Conferment 2018 2019-02-07 Stockholm University has held its annual inauguration and conferment ceremony in the City Hall. New professors were installed and new doctors were conferred. In addition, seven jubilee doctors and nine honorary doctorates were conferred.
  • Three researchers receive EU funding within MSCA 2018-09-26 Three researchers at Stockholm University are awarded funding within Marie Skłodowska Curie (MSCA), which is the EU Research Mobility Program. The projects are in the fields of biochemistry and biophysics, molecular life sciences and astronomy.
  • Inauguration of New Professors and Conferment of Doctoral Degrees 2018-09-25 The combined ceremony for the conferment of doctoral degrees and inauguration of new professors will take place on Friday 28th September 2018 at 5 p.m. in Stockholm City Hall.
  • Japanese students visit Stockholm as part of university collaboration 2018-09-21 A group of students from the University of Tokyo visited Stockholm in September. The ten day program took place as a part of a collaboration between Stockholm University, KTH, KI and the University of Tokyo.
  • The best way to measure air pollution 2018-09-11 How much nitrogen oxide or asphalt particles are there in the air at a certain location in Trelleborg, Sundsvall or Stockholm? This is something that is recorded by different measurement stations located in urban environments around Sweden.
  • Drought hits rivers first and more strongly than agriculture 2018-09-06 Drought develops slowly and has multifaceted and Delayed effects. This makes it difficult to see what the consequences are, compared to extreme weather events, shows a new study.
  • Research on Earth’s climate sensitivities is funded within Horizon 2020 2018-09-06 What can the past of the earth teach us? Is it possible to define the risk of the Earth’s climate sensitivities? These are some of the issues that will be investigated in a research project that is being funded within the EU Horizon 2020 program.
  • Get published in full Open Access free of charge 2018-09-03 All publications in pure open access journals is now free for researchers at Stockholm University and funded centrally through the library as part of efforts to support the transition to 100 percent Open Access.
  • New Swedish initiative to highlight climate-security links 2018-08-30 Stockholm Resilience Centre (SRC) joins collaboration with the Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute and Stockholm International Water Institute.
  • Skelett från vuxen man begravd i Sigtuna på 1000-talet. Skelettet upptäcktes när arkeologer fällde ett träd på en gammal kyrkogård 2008. Half the population of the Viking-town Sigtuna were migrants 2018-08-27 New analysis of the remains of 38 people who lived and died in the town of Sigtuna during the 10th, 11th and 12th century reveals high genetic variation and a wide scale migration.
  • Final conference on chemicals in dust indoors 2018-08-20 By studying the amount of chemicals in the blood of cats, it is possible to assess how the chemical exposure is for small children in our homes.
  • Expedition explores climate history of remote Arctic islands 2018-08-16 On the 19th of August, an eight-days expedition on M/V Stålbas will depart from Longyearbyen, Svalbard for Seven Islands (Sjuøjane) and Storøya, small islands north of Nordaustlandet, Svalbard.
  • Viking Age research on the Swedish island of Birka 2018-08-16 The Black Earth Harbour is a Viking Age harbour on the Swedish island of Birka. We visited the island and interviewed researchers from Stockholm University's Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies on their work and findings.
  • New data exposes the links between tax havens, deforestation and illegal fishing 2018-08-15 New study shows connections between global environmental degradation and tax havens published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.
  • Kebnekaise’s south peak lower than the north peak in August 2018-08-02 The annual measurement shows that Kebnekaise’s south peak no longer will be Sweden’s highest point in a very near future. The forecast is that the south peak will be lower than the north peak in August.
  • What causes the poor health of perch in the Baltic Sea? 2018-08-02 Why does the amount of perch decrease in the Baltic Sea? Could it be because of compounds naturally produced by algae and cyanobacteria? Could it also explain the poor health of several other species in the Baltic Sea?
  • Another clue in the search for the missing ice age carbon 2018-08-02 For the very first time, researchers have estimated the amount of organic carbon stored within the permafrost of the Last Glacial Maximum. The trio of scientists from Stockholm University show that the permanently frozen ground around 21,000 years ago held less carbon than the same area today, a result which is in direct opposition to what has previously been assumed.
  • Three researchers at Stockholm University receive ERC Starting Grants 2018-07-30 Three researchers at Stockholm University receive the prestigious Starting Grant from the European Research Council, ERC. Project funding amounts to up to 1.5 million euros each.
  • En neutrino som interagerar med en molekyl av is. Bild: Nicolle R. Fuller/NSF/IceCube. Neutrinos in the ice indicate source of cosmic rays 2018-07-12 An international research team have identified a likely source for the high energy cosmic rays reaching Earth. The discovery was made with the aid of the IceCube Neutrino Telescope at the South Pole.
  • Artist’s impression of jets of material from first confirmed neutron star merger. Image: Mark Garlick/University of Warwick Beam of light from first confirmed neutron star merger emerge from behind the sun 2018-07-03 An international research team led by astronomers at the University of Warwick and including Stockholm astronomy professor Stephan Rosswog had to wait over 100 days for the sight of the first of confirmed neutron star merger to re-emerge from behind the glare of the sun.
  • Healthy food for a sustainable planet 2018-07-02 The plate of the future has more vegetables and nuts than today, as well as less meat. At least if we are to believe Line Gordon. She wants us all to eat more healthily and sustainably, but without lectures and unilateral solutions.
  • Full speed ahead for the Institute of Latin American Studies 2018-07-02 Interest in the multifaceted and dynamic Latin American continent is increasing in both Europe and the USA, but most of all in China. “We have the wind in our sails,” says Andres Rivarola, associate professor and director of the Institute of Latin American Studies.
  • Children of immigrants have smaller families than their parents 2018-07-02 The children of immigrants typically have smaller families than their parents’ generation, even when their parents’ generation had larger families than the UK norm. This is the result of a new study from Stockholm University published in International Migration Review.
  • More support for researchers at Stockholm University to get published in full Open Access 2018-06-29 The money that Stockholm University saves at the cancelled agreement with large science publisher Elsevier will be used to publish research in full Open Access journals.
  • Astrid Söderbergh Widding och Joakim Malmström skriver under överenskommelsen om Centrum för paleogenetik. Foto: Karin Tjulin. New Centre for Palaeogenetics 2018-06-25 A new agreement brings the research in palaeogenetics of Stockholm University and of the Swedish Museum of Natural History together in the new Centre for Palaeogenetics.
  • Diet is the main source of halogenated flame retardants 2018-06-15 Dietary intake is the main route of exposure to halogenated flame retardants. That is one result from a research project that Joo Hui Tay at the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), presents in a recently defended doctoral thesis.
  • A new approach can shorten the time to assess cancer risk for chemicals 2018-06-14 Chemicals in refined cooking oils like palm oil can cause cancer. In a new doctoral thesis Jenny Aasa has studied two such chemicals, and by using a new approach she hopes to improve and shorten the time for more reliable cancer risk assessments.
  • Plastic degrading in the oceans release chemicals into the water 2018-06-12 Plastic debris accumulates in the environment and can cause physical harm to marine species. The degradation releases chemical compounds to the water and the compounds are dependent on the plastic polymer and the weathering condition of the plastic, shows a new doctoral thesis.
  • EU funding for tool to help job seekers 2018-06-08 The Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) at Stockholm University has been granted EU funding to develop a system, SkillsMatch, that will help job seekers. The goal is to develop an EU-wide system where users get help adapting to the conditions of the labor market, focusing on non-cognitive abilities.
  • In the past three decades interest has surged towards one of the smallest units possible to claim: DNA. A new study reveals that a single company has registered half of all existing patents associated with genes from marine species. Actors such as universities, government bodies, individuals, and hospitals located in only 10 countries accounted for 98% of the patents. Photo: J. Berg/Azote. Racing to claim the biodiversity of the seas 2018-06-07 Who owns ocean biodiversity? New study reveals how a single company has registered half of all existing patents associated with genes from marine species.
  • Video: Expedition Arctic Ocean 2018 2018-06-01 The preparations for the expedition to the Arctic are in full progress. Watch and listen to the researchers packing and testing their equipment, and hear what they hope to achieve.
  • Mission: To manage the cocktail effect 2018-05-25 What happens when we are exposed to many chemicals in a complex mix? As the Swedish government’s special investigator, Christina Rudén, Professor at the Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), will propose strategies for taking into account the cocktail effect in the chemicals legislation.
  • Sweden cancels agreement with Elsevier 2018-05-18 The Swedish research institutes has cancelled the agreement with large publisher Elsevier due to inability to find an agreement on a sustainable price model at the transition to open science.
  • Atmospheric research at the top 2018-05-18 A team of atmospheric scientists from the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES) is currently taking part in air measurements at the highest atmospheric research station in the world.
  • New dissertation: The World Bank and the IMF undermines labour rights 2018-05-17 The instrumentalist approach of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund tend to undermine the international labour standards on freedom of association and collective bargaining in the recipient states.
  • A new puzzle piece to control the aging and age-related diseases 2018-05-16 A basic discovery of how the cellular functions are connected to control aging is presented in the journal Cell Metabolism. The study shows that an increasingly deteriorating communication between the cells' organelles is an important cause of aging.
  • Collapse of the Atlantic Ocean heat transport might lead to hot European summers 2018-04-24 Severe winters combined with heat waves and droughts during summer in Europe. Those were the consequences as the Atlantic Ocean heat transport nearly collapsed 12,000 years ago. The same situation might occur today.
  • Honorary Doctorates 2018 2018-04-24 Stockholm University has chosen this year’s honorary doctors, all of whom have contributed in distinctive ways to the University’s activities in research and education.
  • New publishing tools available 2018-04-17 To make writing and publishing of scientific texts in different formats easier, Stockholm University has licensed two publishing tools: APA Style Central and Overleaf.
  • Cleaner air has increased life expectancy by up to 1 year 2018-04-12 The residents of Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö live one year longer today than 25 years ago. The reason is that the levels of air pollutants from road traffic have fallen.
  • New study on powering the green plant 2018-04-09 Researchers from Stockholm University and SciLifeLab have successfully determined the structure of chlororibosomes providing novel insights into plant protein synthesis and a new perspective on the evolution of translation. The study is published in Nature Plants.
  • Research on Latin America at Stockholm University 2018-04-09 Stockholm University conducts several research projects with a focus on Latin America. Here is a short film which presents our research on Latin America, including the Institute of Latin American Studies.
  • Sergey Naboko, Jonas Bergström, Gleb Nenashev och Alexander Berglund. The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation boosts important research 2018-04-04 Four of the 2018’s grants from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation’s comprehensive investment in mathematics goes to researchers at the Department of Mathematics.
  • The Swedish government is investigating the cocktail effect of chemicals 2018-03-28 Christina Rudén, Professor at the Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), will investigate the risks involved with the cocktail effect of chemicals.
  • Exposure to highly fluorinated chemicals peaks in early life 2018-03-28 Children are exposed to a wide range of highly fluorinated chemicals through multiple pathways including breastfeeding, air inhalation and dust ingestion. The exposure peaks in the first year of life, shows a new doctoral thesis.
  • Thiamine deficiency in wild animals is a serious threat to biodiversity 2018-03-14 Soon the common eiders will return from their winter quarters in Central Europe, but the mortality during the last years has been so high that large areas in the archipelago will be devoid of breeding common eiders.
  • Patrik Henriksson is a postdoctoral researcher at Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University and the Beijer Intistitute of Ecological Economics. Get it right on fish intensity, get it right for aquaculture 2018-03-12 A study from Bangladesh shows that intensification of aquaculture production can reduce some environmental impact, producing more using less.
  • Publish Open Access - without APCs 2018-03-06 Researchers at Stockholm University can now get published in Open Access journals without paying article processing charges (APC), owing to new agreements with four international Open Access publishers.
  • To fly or not to fly – what should climate researchers do? 2018-03-02 To encourage a change in travel habits among the research community, the Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry has launched a project where employees log their own greenhouse gas emissions.
  • A saltier North Atlantic kick-started circulation at the end of the greenhouse world 2018-02-27 A drastic change in ocean circulation patterns over 34 million years ago occurred because surface waters in the far North Atlantic became salty enough to sink. This start-up of Northern deep-water formation purged stagnant waters sourced from the Arctic resulting in a release of carbon dioxide into our atmosphere.
  • What role do ocean margins play in the global carbon cycle? 2018-02-23 By using the radiocarbon dating of land-plant molecules as a clock, an international research team has been able to assess the timescale for transport of organic carbon released from land across coastal seas.
  • New book from Stockholm University unlatched in global Open access project 2018-02-21 Stockholm University has since the start 2014 supported the initiative Knowledge Unlatched, which unlocks research published at traditional publishing houses, and releases it as open access. In March, The triple bind of single-parents families, co-authored by Rense Nieuwenhuis, will be published. But it is already available as a free download.
  • Följ livet på Tarfala – forskningsstationen vid Kebnekaise Life at Tarfala research station at Kebnekaise – over 1km above sea level 2018-02-16 Life at Tarfala research station at Kebnekaise – over 1km above sea level
  • Landsat 8 OLI (Operational Land Imager) image retrieving kilometres of burned forests (magenta colour tones) spread across old-growth forests (green colour tones) in Eastern Amazonia. White colours in the image correspond to clouds. Source: U.S. Geological Survey’s Earth Explorer Platform. A different kind of fire 2018-02-16 Forest fires during drought periods rather than deforestation fires increasingly dominate Amazonian carbon emissions.
  • Carl Cederström – Forskaren som försökte optimera sig själv Carl Cederström – the researcher who tried to optimise himself 2018-02-15 How can we become better people – better-looking, smarter, healthier, and more productive? Over the course of a year, researcher Carl Cederström explored various self-improvement strategies – using himself as the subject. This short film documents what Carl put himself through during that year – in order to optimise his life.
  • Skalle från en stenåldersman med en läkt skada på ovansidan av huvudet. Foto: Fredrik Hallgren. Keep your head high – the Stone Age in a new light 2018-02-15 Stone Age society and Stone Age people’s conception of the world were more complex than previously believed. This according to new analyses of skulls found in Motala, Sweden.
  • Lars Arvestad. Foto: Privat. More researchers need to get involved in Open Science 2018-02-09 Shared data means that several people can use the same data – and spot mistakes. It benefits everyone and changes the dynamic of research, but more researchers need to get involved.
  • A biological switch regulates the amounts of DNA building blocks 2018-02-02 The enzyme that produces DNA building blocks continues to amaze. The latest surprise is that the enzyme’s on/off switch is positioned at a completely novel site in some marine bacteria. Evolution has once again used an existing component in a new way.
  • The road to civilization goes through threat and punishment 2018-01-25 Changes in norms can occur in the meeting between individuals where one punishes the other’s behaviour if it feels threatening, shows a new study.
  • Swedish-Danish initiative on network collaboration on cryomic microscopy 2018-01-23 A new Swedish-Danish research alliance wants to advance understanding of how biological molecules look and behave. With support from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation and the Novo Nordisk Foundation, scientists at four universities in Sweden and Denmark will join forces to create a Nordic network in cryoelectron microscopy, whose developers were awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
  • Connecting Swedish and Japanese universities through research, education and innovation 2019-02-05 MIRAI is a collaboration project between seven Swedish universities and eight Japanese universities which aims to strengthen academic collaboration between Sweden and Japan.
  • New institution strengthens social science public health research 2018-01-11 In January 2018, the Department of Public Health Sciences was formed when the research institutes CHESS and SoRAD joined forces. This merger promises to further strengthen social science research on public health at Stockholm University.
  • Hiding from a warmer climate in the forest 2018-01-11 Global warming threatens forest plants adapted to cooler temperatures. An international team of scientists from the universities of Stockholm, Marseille and Helsinki have unravelled where these species could survive within colder spots in the same forest. The findings can help to understand the effect of climate change on forest biodiversity and what we can do to protect it.
  • A quick glance can be enough to see if someone’s sick 2018-01-04 Onlookers can detect small differences in the mouths, eyes, and skin of people who are sick. That shows in new research study from Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet.
  • Stockholm University professor participate in Nordic University Hubs 2018-01-02 A total of up to NOK 180 million in funding has been awarded to six hubs proposed in response to the call for proposals for NordForsk's new funding instrument, Nordic University Hubs. Stockholm University will participate in one consortium through Professor Belén Martín-Matute from the Department of Organic Chemistry.
  • Outstanding environmental chemist Visiting Professor at the University 2017-12-27 Derek Muir, senior research scientist at Environment and Climate Change Canada, has been appointed as the holder of King Carl XVI Gustaf’s Visiting Professor in Environmental Science.
  • We are solving the mysteries of water 2017-12-27 Researchers at Stockholm University are closing in on the truth about water. Why is it different from all other fluids?
  • Seven Wallenberg Academy fellows to Stockholm University 2017-12-15 Johanna Rickne is one of the outstanding researchers who have been selected as Wallenberg Academy Fellows this year.
  • ERC Consolidator Grant for a project that studies same sex and different sex couples with children 2017-12-11 Marie Evertsson, Professor at the Swedish Institute for Social Research, has been awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant of 2 million euros over 5 years for her project GENPARENT: Revealing Sources of Gendered Parenthood: A multi-method comparative study of the transition to parenthood in same-sex and different-sex couples.
  • How the cat parasite exploits immune cells to reach the brain 2017-12-07 Scientists have previously shown that a parasite from cats can infect people's brain and affect our behaviour. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have discovered how the parasite takes control of our cells.
  • Stockholm University 81 in the world within Physical Sciences 2017-11-30 Stockholm University is found at position 81 in Physical Sciences in the newly released 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings by subject.
  • Blue whale, Photo: Doc White, Nature Picture Library, UIG Ambidextrous blue whales spark interest of the international press 2017-11-27 A joint study of the blue whale co-authored by Stockholm University’s James E. Herbert-Read and published in Current Biology has captured the imagination of news outlets worldwide.
  • Early farming may have spread over Europe from Greece 2017-11-22 The Neolithization, when societies were restructured during the Stone age and people turned from hunting and gathering to farming, is probably the most important process in our history. For a century researchers were much guessing how the process happened, and only during the recent years have they been able to work out how the process occurred, with the help of DNA from ancient remains.
  • Women fishing for shells in the seagrass, Tanzania. Photo: Lina Mtwana Nordlund. Seagrass is a key fishing ground globally 2017-11-17 New research demonstrates that seagrass meadows are important fishing grounds all around the globe. The work highlights that there is an urgent need to start appreciating and understanding this role to be able to build more sustainable fisheries. A new study examines the global extent to which these underwater meadows support fishing activity.
  • Generous people listen with their heart 2017-11-15 Some people like to share with others. Why is this so? New research shows that sometimes generosity goes hand in hand with “listening to your heart.”
  • Research on Arctic permafrost is funded within Horizon 2020 2017-11-24 How does climate change affect the Arctic coastal environment? And how can the challenges be met by people who live there? These are some of the issues that will be investigated in the project Nunataryuk, which is being funded within the EU Horizon 2020 program.
  • How a “shadow zone” traps the world’s oldest ocean water 2017-11-13 New research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years.
  • Nordic Optical Telescope. The stars that refuse to die 2017-11-13 In recent years, two new supernovas have been observed which don't act like supernovas usually do. New, more effective scanning telescopes are catching new behaviours.
  • Stockholm University 65 in the world within Life Sciences 2017-11-09 Stockholm University is ranked 65 within Life Sciences in the newly released 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings by subject.
  • Edjrar i Stockholms skärgård. Foto: Johan Bjurer/Mostphotos Study confirms thiamine deficiency behind eider population decline 2017-11-06 Lethal deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1) is widespread among wildlife over large geographical areas in the Northern Hemisphere. Now, researchers from Stockholm University with colleagues from the Swedish National Veterinary Institute show that there is a direct link between thiamine deficiency and the population decline in the common eider in Sweden.
  • Mammutbete Male mammoths more often died in natural traps 2017-11-03 Most wolly mammoths found are male. These new findings suggests inexperienced male mammoths more often travelled alone and got themselves killed by falling into natural traps.
  • Beatrice Crona Beatrice Crona, SRC, awarded fellowship on global health 2017-10-30 SRC researcher Beatrice Crona selected as fellow to the Swedish Institute for Global Health Transformation (SIGHT).
  • The Guanches originated from North Africa, shows DNA-study 2017-10-26 The aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands, commonly known as the Guanches, originated from North Africa. A team of international researchers led by Stockholm University, and including Liverpool John Moores University’s Dr Linus Girdland-Flink, has now confirmed this long-held hypothesis. The result has been achieved by sequencing ancient DNA extracted from the University of Edinburgh’s collection of skulls from Guanches who lived on Gran Canaria and Tenerife prior to the European conquest in the 15th century AD.
  • Research and Innovation Addressing Societal Challenges – Meet the Academic Sweden 2017-10-23 On Thursday 26 October, the Embassy of Sweden to the USA is hosting a seminar with five leading Swedish universities: Umeå University, Uppsala University, Stockholm University, University of Gothenburg and Lund University.
  • Forskare från Stockholms universitet tar sedimentprov från havsbotten utanför Askö i Sörmland. Foto: Alessandra Vicenzi. Baltic clams and worms release as much greenhouse gas as 20 000 dairy cows 2017-12-15 Worms and clams enhance the release of methane up to eight times more compared to sea bottoms without animals, shows a study by scientists at Stockholm University and Cardiff University.
  • Research on new materials is funded within Horizon 2020 2017-10-12 The goal is to create new self-cleaning materials or extra water repellent coatings. The research is now being funded within the EU Horizon 2020 program.
  • Mikael Oliveberg. Foto: Niklas Björling. The life of cells – live! 2017-10-05 Soon we will have a nearly complete picture of the cell’s molecular machinery. The issue now is understanding how protein molecules work together to create a microcosm that is stable and functions as well as it does. Thanks to a 20 million SEK (2.5 million USD) grant, Michael Oliveberg and his colleagues can search for the answer.
  • Sara Strandberg. Foto: Vilhelm Stokstad. Quest for the unknown elementary particle 2017-10-05 One of particle physics’ biggest unsolved mysteries is how the Higgs particle can be so light, which is at odds with the prevailing theories. Thanks to a 35.2 million SEK (4.34 million USD) grant, Sara Strandberg and her colleagues can go on the hunt for new particles that could explain the mass of the Higgs boson.
  • Busy schedule for Honorary Doctor Thuram 2017-10-03 Lilian Thuram, French author and former football player spent a busy week in Stockholm in connection with receiving an Honorary Doctorate at Stockholm University.
  • Inauguration and Conferment 2017 2018-03-20 The Stockholm City Hall was fully packed at Stockholm University's conferment ceremony of new doctors and new professors. The Vice-Chancellor highlighted the importance of the University's independent research and its importance to the surrounding society.
  • Need for information regarding the processing of personal data 2017-09-28 On 25 May 2018, the EU’s new data protection regulation will enter into force.
  • Trend towards free access 2017-10-19 Financiers and researchers are demanding increased access to research data and publications, and this development has already come a long way.
  • Researchers' Days: Effects of toxic boat paint/Large molecules in space 2017-09-27 Recent PhDs Maria Bighiu, Environmental Science, and Michael Gatchell, Physics, will give a double open lecture. The first part concerns how toxic paints on boats harm the environment. The second part concerns how some of the largest molecules in space are formed and evolve. The lecture is given as part of Researchers' Days 2017. Moderated by author Gabriella Ahlström.
  • First research collaboration between Stockholm and Tokyo is on ageing 2018-01-19 How can research help a society deal with an ever-ageing population? This issue was discussed at a workshop held to mark the start of a collaboration between Stockholm’s three leading academic institutes and University of Tokyo.
  • Climate Report presented in the UN 2017-09-19 It is possible to limit global warming to less than two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, but only if the world takes fast action. This is the conclusion in a new report written by 33 leading climate scientists and climate advisors. The report “Well Under 2 Degrees Celsius. Fast Action Policies to Protect People and the Planet from Extreme Climate Change” was presented on September 18 at the United Nations headquarters in New York, during the United Nation’s Climate Week.
  • Stockholm University 82 in the world within Arts & humanities 2017-09-13 Stockholm University tops the THE Arts & humanities ranking in Sweden.
  • The underwater jungles of the sea give clearer water 2017-08-31 When you take a swim in the sea and entangle your toes in underwater plants you can stay calm, they are doing good.
  • Seven ERC-grants to Stockholm University 2017-08-28 Seven researchers at Stockholm University have been awarded the prestigious Starting Grant from the European Research Council. The funding ranges from 1.3 to almost 1.5 million euros each. Five of the scientists will continue their research at Stockholm University.
  • Kebnekaise’s south peak still highest in Sweden 2017-08-24 The annual measurement by researchers from Stockholm University shows that Kebnekaise’s south peak is still the highest peak in Sweden. Climate change, however, will make the north peak the country’s highest point within a few years.
  • Right kind of collaboration is key to solving environmental problems 2017-08-18 Society’s ability to solve environmental problems is tied to how different actors collaborate and the shape and form of the networks they create, says a new study from researchers at Stockholm Resilience Centre which is published in the journal Science.
  • Stockholm becomes world’s focus for global sustainability as 1,000 experts meet 2017-08-17 From coral reefs to megacities – for six days global sustainability and resilience scientists will debate the future of Earth when over 1,000 experts on resilience and global sustainability meet in Stockholm for two major international conferences, 20-26 August, the largest gathering of its kind.
  • Researchers and fishing companies form coalition for sustainable seas 2017-08-09 Researchers from Stockholm Resilience Centre convened seafood companies to form a coalition to end unsustainable practices such as overfishing, modern slavery and destructive impacts on marine life.
  • A new Botulinum Neurotoxin discovered 2017-08-03 The first new Botulinum Neurotoxin in almost half a century has been discovered by researchers at Stockholm University and Harvard Medical School.
  • Professor Anders Nilsson Water Exists as Two Different Liquids 2017-06-28 Scientists at Stockholm University have discovered two phases of liquid water with large differences in structure and density.
  • Arctic subsea permafrost is thawing faster than thought 2017-06-27 The permafrost in the ocean bottom below the East Siberian Arctic Sea is thawing at a rate of 14 cm per year. That’s a lot faster than for permafrost on land and the process may eventually lead to increased global warming through increased release of methane according to a new study published by Nature Communications with Stockholm University scientists among the research team.
  • New insights into the toxin behind tetanus 2017-06-26 Tetanus toxin is the neurotoxin that causes lockjaw. Many are vaccinated, but tetanus still kills tens of thousands of people per year worldwide. Researchers from the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, led by Dr Pål Stenmark, have now uncovered the poison’s structure. For the first time, the way the poison is constructed has been revealed.
  • Makaker, och andra djur, har mycket svårt att hantera information som kommer i en viss ordning. Det kan vara just det som skiljer människor från andra djur. Foto: Johan Lind/N Memory for stimulus sequences distinguishes humans from other animals 2017-06-21 Humans possess many cognitive abilities not seen in other animals, such as a full-blown language capacity as well as reasoning and planning abilities. Despite these differences, it has been difficult to identify specific mental capacities that distinguish humans from other animals. Now reserachers have discovered that humans have a much better memory to recognize and remember sequential information.
  • Martin Jakobsson på isbrytaren Oden under en tidigare forskningsexpedition i Arktis. Mapping the world sea floor 2017-06-19 By 2030, the entire sea floor will be charted. The Nippon Foundation intends to provide 18.5 million USD and Stockholm University is one of four research centres involved.
  • Arrheniuslaboratoriet byggs om för att hysa nytt transmissionselektronmikroskop Microscopes and collaboration will make the University a world leader 2017-06-19 One of the world’s most advanced electron microscopes will soon be located at Stockholm University. The collaborative project CEM4MAT will be launched in connection with this investment in order to make better use of available microscopes in the region and become a world leader in electron microscopy.
  • Research at the Yangzte River Delta Swedish/Chinese collaboration results in publication on chemical pollution 2017-06-09 A major collaboration between Swedish and Chinese researchers recently resulted in the publication of a book entitled “Chemical Pollution: Challenges in the Yangtze River Delta”.
  • Sahara greening intensify cyclone activity 2017-06-08 Future climate warming could lead to a re-greening of the southernmost Sahara, with decreased dust emissions and changes in land cover.
  • Sökhandledning på Stockholms universitetsbibliotek Welcome to our Search Hub! 2017-09-28 The Search Hub, close to the information desk, offers you help with any questions you might have about searching information and registration for audio books and more.
  • Breaking the cycle of poverty 2017-05-04 Development aid must incorporate culture and nature better in efforts to push communities out of poverty, researchers argue in a recent study.
  • Fish cooperate for selfish reasons 2017-04-20 Why do animals help raise offspring that aren’t their own? A new study by an international team of researchers from Sweden, Canada and the UK shows that fish cooperate to raise another fish’s offspring to reduce their own risk of being eaten by a predator.
  • Neisseria meningitidis bildar kolonier i svalget och kan släppa taget och sprida sig i kroppen. Lactate from Human Cells May Trigger Key Step in Invasion by Meningitis-Causing Bacteria 2017-04-11 Lactate produced in the upper throat might trigger meningitis-causing bacterial cells to detach from tiny colonies and spread within the body, according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens. Findings could improve understanding of how harmless bacteria in throat can turn dangerous
  • Honorary Doctorates 2017 2018-04-20 Stockholm University has chosen this year’s honorary doctors, all of whom have contributed in distinctive ways to the University's activities in research and education.
  • Barry Brown Barry creates smart environments 2017-03-31 How often do you look at your mobile phone and what do you use it for? These are questions that Barry Brown studies in order to created smarter technical solutions.
  • Mobile Life Mobile technology that puts people first 2017-03-31 Pleasure, enjoyment and happiness – these have been the watchwords of Mobile Life, whose operations will now continue at the Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
  • Oskar Juhlin Research applied at home and on the catwalk 2017-03-31 The ability to “download” clothing from fashion shows directly to your computer or broadcast live via your mobile phone together with others – these are some of the results of Oskar Juhlin’s research at Mobile Life.
  • David Strömberg. Photo: Anna-Karin Landin/Stockholm University. ERC Grant for research on social media in China 2017-03-24 David Strömberg, Professor in Economics at Stockholm University, has received an ERC Advanced Grant for a project on the effects of the explosive growth of social media in China.
  • Johan Rockström. Photo: Stockholm University. ERC Grant for research on the planet’s resilience 2017-03-24 Johan Rockström, Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University, has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant for his research project “Earth Resilience in the Anthropocene.”
  • Frank Wilczek. Foto: Stockholms universitet. ERC Grant to detect the existence of axions 2017-03-24 Frank Wilczek, professor at the Department of Physics at Stockholm University, has been awarded the ERC Advanced Grant for the theoretical study of axions. Axions are hypothetical particles whose existence would solve the dark matter problem.
  • Kaj Börjeson. Foto: Stokcholms universitet. Loop Spaces – a new way to solve old problems 2017-03-24 Kaj Börjeson will present his doctoral thesis in mathematics in 2017. Thanks to a grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, he will hold a postdoctoral position with Professor Nathalie Wahl, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Frank Ball. Foto: EAJ2016. Better epidemiology models thanks to grant 2017-03-24 Frank Ball, professor at the University of Nottingham, UK, will be a visiting professor at the Department of Mathematics, Stockholm University thanks to a grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.
  • Three ERC Advanced Grants to Stockholm University 2017-03-24 Frank Wilczek, professor at the Department of Physics and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Johan Rockström, Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre and David Strömberg at the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES). These three professors at Stockholm University will receive prestigious ERC Advanced Grants.
  • VR Grant for research on gravitational waves 2017-03-23 Ariel Goobar, Department of Physics, has been awarded the new Research Environment Grant from the Swedish Research Council. It’s a six year grant of around 2.4 million USD for a project on gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation.
  • Your sense of smell can predict risk of death 2017-03-22 A decreased sense of smell is correlated with an increased risk of death, a new psychology study from Stockholm University shows. The connection is independent from other health variables like age, gender and dementia.
  • Chemistry professor Xiaodong Zou inducted to IVA 2017-03-13 The Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA) has elected eight new members. One of the new members is Xiaodong Zou in the Chemical Engineering division.
  • Researchers at Stockholm University have high mobility and impact 2017-03-10 A report sponsored by the Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education has found that researchers at Stockholm University are highly mobile – researching and publishing internationally and nationally to produce highly cited, impactful research.
  • Julia Uddén receives the prize from Minister Helene Hellmark Knutsson. Photo: Emma Burendahl Promising young neurolinguistic researcher wins prize 2017-03-08 Julia Uddén is one of two researchers to win this year’s L’Oréal-Unesco ‘For Women in Science’ Prize. Her research in language and psychology focuses on why some people are better at communicating than others.
  • Marmat Nekoro Baltic Sea Future moves forward 2017-03-10 The congress Baltic Sea Future has gathered people from all over the Baltic region to share thoughts and ideas, experiences and solutions.
  • Abacus, Photo: Gusto Images UIG When counting isn’t enough – creating a more equal society 2017-02-24 The profile area Normativity, Law & Ethics analyses inequalities in society and the ethical considerations, laws and policies that work to perpetuate or alleviate them. Dr Eva Wittbom talks about her research on how the ideals of equality are translated into practice.
  • Photo: Jana Weiss High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats 2017-02-24 A study from Stockholm University has now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes.
  • ”Collaboration is about relations” – successful closing of academic collaboration forum 2017-02-20 Collaborations and relations were in focus at the Stockholm Excellence Seminar, hosted by Stockholm University and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, which attracted more than hundred participants from higher education and research institutions around the world.
  • Niclas Jareborg. Foto: J.Blid. Data Management in the Life Sciences 2017-03-06 Niclas Jareborg will talk about ongoing efforts by national and European infrastructures that aim to facilitate proper data management and Open Access movement for Life Science research data.
  • Professor at a record-young age 2017-02-11 Professor Ilona Riipinen at the Department Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), is the youngest person appointed to a professorship at Stockholm University in the 21st century.​
  • Malariamyggorna får mat. Foto: Anna-Karin Landin/Stockholms universitet. Why malaria mosquitoes like people with malaria 2017-02-09 Malaria mosquitoes prefer to feed – and feed more – on blood from people infected with malaria. Researchers from Stockholm University among others have discovered why. The findings can lead to new ways to fight malaria without using poisonous chemicals.
  • Stockholm University hosts international meeting on research collaboration 2017-01-31 Stockholm University will host the Stockholm Excellence Seminar with participants from Republic of Korea, Singapore, China, Indonesia and Brazil on 14 February. The seminar is the final activity in a two year project for research collaboration between researchers in Sweden and these five countries.
  • New online publication on resilience thinking and global development 2017-01-30 Last month, the Stockholm Resilience Centre launched Rethink (rethink.earth). The new online magazine publishes in-depth features that communicate resilience thinking to people who might use it in global development, policy making, research, and more.
  • Man waiting mostphotos The paradox of migration – links, loss and belonging 2017-01-26 Migrants of all types employ different strategies - adapting to their new environment and adapting their environments to themselves. Profs Annika Rabo, Erik Olsson and Bengt Karlsson discuss education, welfare and policy making.
  • Major Viking Age manor discovered at Birka 2017-01-19 For centuries it has been speculated where the manor of the royal bailiff of Birka, Herigar, might have been located. New geophysical results provide evidence of its location at Korshamn, outside the town rampart of the Viking Age proto-town Birka in Sweden. The results will be published in the international scientific journal Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt.
  • Challenges in adding up the sources of methane 2017-01-18 The greenhouse gas methane has many natural sources, and understanding how large each of those sources are remains an unfinished task. This is important when trying to predict future methane emissions and global warming. A new study from researchers at Stockholm University shows how double-counting of methane sources, particularly wetlands and lakes, might be occurring in research. The study has been published in Geophysical Research Letters.
  • Viking Amulet, The Granger Collection, UIG Contextualising art – physical artefacts and immaterial legacies 2017-01-17 Making meaning out of what we experience is central to being human, and the interpretation of works of art (both scholarly and not) can reveal surprising, multi-valent insights. Profs Peter Gillgren and Anders Andrén explore issues of Cultural Heritage, Historical Artefacts and Processes.
  • Cellular packaging of DNA Henning Dalhoff UIG thumbnail Expression, mutation and adaptation – genetics beyond DNA 2017-01-13 While understanding DNA and chromosomes is essential to genetics, how genes are actually expressed is just as important. Profs Neus Visa and Mattias Mannervik discuss their research into the protein complexes that regulate DNA and RNA and the future of epigenetics.
  • Black Guillemots, David Tipling UIG Understanding the climate one tree, bog and bird at a time 2017-01-04 The changing climate is one of our most pressing problems, and innovative approaches are crucial to our continued survival. Drs Britta Sannel, Ilona Riipinen, and Henrik Österblom all discuss the power of one organism to change our view of the world.
  • Herring gull with thiamine deficiency, Photo: Lennart Balk Thiamine deficiency in wildlife more widespread than previously thought 2017-01-02 Deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in wildlife was previously described as a problem among certain species within relatively limited geographical areas. Now, researchers at ACES, together with colleagues from several other research institutions in Europe and North America, show that thiamine deficiency is far more widespread than previously thought.
  • Man being stalked, Scott Greisel Victimisation & rehabilitation - Crime as a mirror of society 2017-01-13 Research into Crime and Punishment is as complicated as it is important. Drs Tove Pettersson, Eva Tiby, and Petter Asp address how the ways in which we treat victims, offenders and bystanders show who we are as a society.
  • Lynette Cook/Science Photo Library/Universal Images Group Today’s particle physics, tomorrow’s technology 2016-12-22 Astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics ask the “big questions” at both the subatomic and galactic levels. In videos, Drs Sara Strandberg and Jan Conrad describe their research questions, demonstrate their processes using models, and reveal how breakthroughs in physics have led to major technological revolutions.
  • Spectacular supernova was spinning black hole 2016-12-19 The supernova ASSASN15lh drew headlines earlier this year as the brightest supernova ever, but scientists have found it difficult to explain the fenomenon. In an article in Nature Astronomy researchers from Stockholm University, among other universities, are launching a theory that it is in fact a star that has ended up too close to a supermassive black hole and been torn apart by gravity.
  • Stockholm University Researchers in the Antarctic 2016-12-16 The research project MAGIC-DML aims to study the changes in the ice sheets covering Queen Maud Land in Antarctica. The goal is to create a detailed history of the ice cover, focusing on how its thickness and surface area has varied over time. The international collaboration includes researchers from Stockholm University.
  • Martin Högbom receives ERC Consolidator Grant 2016-12-16 Martin Högbom at the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, has been awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant. He and his team will study how proteins use metals to achieve complex chemical reactions. The aim of the research is to better understand the chemical reactions that among other things are important for the conversion to green industrial processes and green energy systems.
  • Study sheds new light into the link between thawing permafrost and climate change 2016-12-02 A new study by researchers at Stockholm University shows how large-scale thawing of Arctic permafrost released huge amounts of carbon at the end of the last Ice Age. Frozen carbon reservoirs in the Arctic are currently being released again, which threatens to accelerate climate warming. The results were published in the journal Nature Communications.
  • An orangutan builds an umbrella against the rain. Efficient and intelligent behaviour that can be explained by new research from Stockholm University and Brooklyn College. Photo: Johan Lind/N. Learning makes animals intelligent 2016-11-30 The fact that animals can use tools, have self-control and certain expectations of life can be explained with the help of a new learning model for animal behaviour. Researchers at Stockholm University and Brooklyn College have combined knowledge from the fields of artificial intelligence, ethology and the psychology of learning to solve several problems concerning the behaviour and intelligence of animals.
  • Frank Wilczek photo: Niklas Björling thumbnail The Nobel laureate who got hooked on Stockholm 2018-09-20 Childhood interest in mathematics and technology took Frank Wilczek all the way to a Nobel Prize. Now he will spend a large fraction of his time in Sweden where he is trying to crack the secret of dark matter.
  • Amid rapid change, major Arctic study highlights need to prepare for surprises 2016-11-25 The Arctic Resilience Report, published today, is the first comprehensive assessment of ecosystems and societies in the region. It identifies 19 “tipping points” in natural systems that could radically reshape the Arctic in the coming century, and calls for urgent cooperation to build local communities’ resilience and capacity to adapt to rapid and widespread change.
  • Antarctica: the quest for the oldest ice on Earth 2016-11-17 EU funds three-year project to decipher climate history with 2.2 million Euros.
  • Global “safe operating spaces” for coral reefs identified in new study 2016-11-02 A new study analyses how much more fishing, nutrient pollution and climate change the world’s coral reefs can endure.
  • One hormone to rule them all 2016-11-02 Identifying stress hormones in insects can be a step towards environmentally friendly pesticides. Researchers from Stockholm University have discovered that one hormone coordinates the responses to stress in fruit flies. Their study is recently published in the Royal Society journal Open Biology.
  • Reaching Out with Open Access – A new era for Latin American Studies in the Nordic Region 2016-10-31 As of October the Iberoamericana – Nordic Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies is published openly online, replacing its print edition since 1977 with a more accessible format.
  • Rainstorms transport aerosol particles essential for cloud formation 2016-10-27 A new study published in Nature shows that rapid downdraft during precipitation carries a sufficient number of small particles and thus provide a new population of particles that eventually forms new cloud.
  • Fashion research in focus at Stockholm University 2016-10-28 Luxury and sustainability in the clothing industry were two of the topics on the agenda when the Global Fashion Conference was organized at Stockholm University 20-21 October, where representatives from the academia and the industry met to discuss future challenges within the fashion industry worldwide.
  • Drought-tolerant species thrive despite returning rains in the Sahel 2016-10-19 Following the devastating droughts in the Sahel region south of the Sahara desert, vegetation has now recovered. What surprises the researchers is that although it is now raining more and has become greener, it is particularly the more drought resistant species that thrive. The conclusion is that not only rain but also agriculture and human utilization of trees, bushes and land affect the plants recovering.
  • New research vessel to help reduce Baltic Sea pollution 2016-10-18 Researchers are celebrating the inauguration of Stockholm University’s new research vessel Electra af Askö. Packed with high-tech equipment, it will give a more complete picture of pollution in the Baltic Sea.
  • Major projects funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation 2016-10-06 Making plentiful-but-dangerous chemicals easier, better and safer to use. Making new tools to understand how the sun’s magnetic field heats its chromosphere. Solving the energy crisis with X-ray lasers. Developing a better way of measuring the climate. These are the projects at Stockholm University that have received funding from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.
  • Ancient DNA reveals the peopling of the Soutwest Pacific 2016-10-04 More than 3,000 years ago, a group of people set out from the Solomon Island chain in the southwestern edge of the Pacific Ocean and steered their outrigger canoes toward the horizon, with no land as far as their eyes could see. These people and their descendants were to be the first to cross more than 350 kilometer stretches of open ocean into a region known as Remote Oceania. Now, DNA sequences are for the first time telling us more about the ancestral origins of these people, and their genetic legacy that lives on in Pacific Islanders today.
  • Meeting place for environmental law 2016-10-04 When the Stockholm Environmental Law and Policy Centre was established in 2004, the aim was to create meeting places for researchers and professionals working with issues relating to environmental law. The Centre wanted to disseminate its research results and highlight the relevance of research on environmental law. Furthermore, it aimed to create a platform for inviting researchers from other universities.
  • Georgia Destouni. Foto: Niklas Björling Climate change is studied from a wide perspective 2016-10-03 What happens to water and soil conditions, ecology and biodiversity when the temperature rises? And how are species of plants and animals affected? Researchers at the interdisciplinary research programme Ekoklim at Stockholm University are looking for answers to these questions.
  • Nordenskioldbreen på Svalbard. Foto: Martin Jakobsson Research across disciplines aims to understand the climate 2016-10-06 The Bolin Centre for Climate Research gathers researchers from Stockholm University, KTH and SMHI.
  • Abraham Mendoza. Foto: Niklas Björling ERC Starting Grant to Abraham Mendoza 2016-08-29 Abraham Mendoza at the Department of Organic Chemistry, Stockholm University, has been awarded an ERC Starting Grant of up to 1.5 million euro over five years. His research project will seek ways to accelerate the transformation of simple materials into tailor-made complex molecules.
  • Zhandang-glaciären på tibetanska högplatån. Foto: Chaoliu Li Uncovering the sources of the Himalayan glacier melt 2016-08-29 A Swedish-Chinese study has determined the source of the soot particulates which are causing the Himalaya-Tibet glaciers to melt, according to an article in Nature Communications. The researchers can not only determine the causes of the soot, e.g. wood burning or fossil fuels, but also its geographical origin.
  • Dark matter comes closer to the light 2016-09-02 Dark matter – what it is, what it does, what it’s made of – is one of the most fascinating and hotly contested subjects in astrophysics today. A team from the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics at Stockholm University, headed by Manuel Meyer, has come one step closer to cracking the code. Working with the Fermi Telescope, they investigated whether a widely held assumption about dark matter might be 180 degrees wrong.
  • Photo: Dr Oliver Konter, Mainz Pine oldest living known inhabitant in Europe 2016-08-19 A Bosnian pine (Pinus heldreichii) growing in the highlands of northern Greece has been dendrocronologically dated to be more than 1075 years old. This makes it currently the oldest known living tree in Europe.
  • Photograph: Radovan Krejci, co-author of the study. On this picture, thin mid-level clouds are observed in the foreground with deep convective clouds in the background. Thin tropical clouds cool the climate 2016-08-17 Thin clouds at about 5 km altitude are more ubiquitous in the tropics than previously thought and they have a cooling effect on climate. This is shown in a recent study by researchers from Stockholm University and the University of Miami published in Nature Communications.
  • Hunter-Gatherers Experimented with Farming in Turkey before Migrating to Europe 2016-08-04 Clusters of hunter-gatherers spent much of the late Stone Age working out the basics of farming in what is now Turkey before taking this knowledge to Europe. In an analysis of ancient genomes in Current Biology, researchers at Stockholm University and Uppsala University in Sweden and Middle East Technical University in Turkey report that at least two waves of early European settlers belonged to the same gene pool as farmers in Central Turkey.
  • New theory of the genetics of kin cooperation in microorganisms 2016-06-28 Microbes such as bacteria and fungi cooperate and help their relatives. Researchers can now answer questions about how they cooperate and what role genetics play. This new theory could be crucial to understand the development of new genetic variants of microbes.
  • Airplanes make clouds brighter 2016-06-23 Clouds may have a net warming or cooling effect on climate, depending on their thickness and altitude. Artificially formed clouds called contrails form due to aircraft effluent. In a cloudless sky, contrails are thought to have minimal effect on climate. But what happens when the sky is already cloudy?
  • Julia Uddén. Two Stockholm University researchers win the prestigious Pro Futura 2016-06-17 Historian Aryo Makko and Linguist Julia Uddén are two of the five young researchers chosen as 2016 Pro Futura fellows. Riksbankens Jubileumfond sponsors the award for cutting-edge research in the humanities and social sciences.
  • Moving to Sweden as a researcher 2019-04-25 Recent arrivals from three continents and four different fields talk about collegiality and research environment at Stockholm University
  • Den svenska delegationen Research seminar in Brazil 2016-06-03 The fifth seminar for the Swedish Academic Collaboration Forum, SACF, was held in Brazil in the middle of May. The project will conclude in February 2017 with a conference in Stockholm that will include the representatives from the five participating countries.
  • New light into our climate’s cloudier past 2016-05-26 In two new papers published in Nature, researchers from Stockholm University along with colleagues from Europe and the USA, imply that the baseline pristine pre-industrial climate may have been cloudier than presently thought. New results from the CLOUD experiment at CERN, Switzerland, shows that organic vapours emitted by trees produce abundant aerosol particles in the atmosphere in the absence of sulphuric acid.
  • Liane Colonna. Foto: Stockholms universitet. Need for international convention on data surveillance 2016-05-24 The personal data of EU citizens is insufficiently protected by US law from being data mined within the context of American national intelligence programs. This is the conclusion of a dissertation from the Faculty of Law at Stockholm University.
  • Babyhand. Mostphotos Large research initiative on children, migration and integration 2016-05-17 Stockholm University plans to invest 15 million Swedish kronor on a concerted research effort on children, migration and integration.
  • Environmental toxins accumulate in wild animals in China 2016-05-11 Many animal species in southern China carry high levels of organohalogen contaminants. Most common is DDT, which has been banned for a long time in many parts of the world. New types of PCBs as well as polychlorinated carbon compounds and chloroparaffins were also found.
  • Swedish delegation to Brazil 2016-05-04 Brazil is the next stop for the Swedish Academic Collaboration Forum project which aims to promote research collaborations between researchers in the host country and six universities in Sweden. A delegation from Stockholm University of 13, led by Pro Vice-Chancellor Hans Adolfsson, will participate in the next seminar 16-20 May in Brasil.
  • Youngest Ph.D wants to understand the mathematics of non-experts 2018-04-09 Whether mathematics is real, or a story we agreed upon, has long been debated by philosophers. A new dissertation from Stockholm University shows that philosophers failed to include non-experts in the theories. Stefan Buijsman recently defended his thesis in philosophy of mathematics, as Sweden's youngest Ph.D ever.
  • Eroderande kustnära permafrost från Laptevhavet. Foto: Denis Kosmach. Severe Arctic Ocean acidification via permafrost thawing and river runoff 2016-04-20 When organic material from thawing permafrost is transported to the sea and breaks down in the seawater it contributes to a more rapid acidification of the Arctic Ocean, finds new research by scientists from Stockholm University and colleagues.
  • Virtual spiders treat phobias 2016-04-14 Crawling spiders with hairy legs are scary to many people. Despite the fact that we do not have any dangerous spiders in Sweden, this is the most common animal phobia. When the phobia becomes so strong that it affects your daily life, it may be time to seek help.
  • Jenny White. Foto: privat. Jenny White – new professor of Turkish Studies 2016-04-11 New professor at the Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS) at the Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies is Jenny White, currently Professor of Antropology at Boston University. Jenny White was Distinguished Visiting Professor at SUITS during the academic year 2013–2014.
  • Grant for research on markets and economic development 2016-04-08 The foundation Ragnar Söderbergs Stiftelse funds three projects in economics with an amount of more than 6 million Swedish kronor each. Stockholm University has received one of those grants for the project “Market Integration and Economic Development”.
  • Torkkänsliga tusenåriga träd från bergen i Grekland. Indirekta belägg för variationer i neder-börd och torka såsom trädringsserier användes av forskarna för att rekonstruera variationer i relativ vattentillgång på norra halvklotet under tolv århundraden. Foto: Paul J. Krusic. Large variations in precipitation over the past millennium 2016-04-06 According to a new study in Nature, the Northern Hemisphere has experienced considerably larger variations in precipitation during the past twelve centuries than in the twentieth century. Researchers from Sweden, Germany, and Switzerland have found that climate models overestimated the increase in wet and dry extremes as temperatures increased during the twentieth century. The new results will enable us to improve the accuracy of climate models and to better predict future precipitation changes.
  • Large grants to research projects on thawing permafrost and social economy 2016-04-05 Two researchers from Stockholm University have received grants from the European Research Council, ERC Advanced Grant, to fund their respective research projects. Örjan Gustafsson, professor at the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, for his study of the effect of thawing permafrost on climate and Torsten Persson, professor at the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES), for his study on how individual and social motives interact in driving individual decisions.
  • Indonesia seminar with workshops on land-use change and civil society 2016-04-01 Five researchers from Stockholm University participated in the Indonesia – Sweden Excellence Seminar held 14 – 17 March in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The seminar is a part of the project Swedish Academic Collaboration Forum shared by six Swedish universities and funded by STINT.
  • Erik den heliges skalle The legend of Erik the Saint may be true 2016-03-18 Erik the Holy may well have been killed in the way the legend says. Archaeologists at Stockholm University has contributed with important clues about the injuries found on the skeleton, and about diet habits and migration patterns of the individual whose remains have been examined.
  • Astrid Söderbergh Widding “Give Open Access and Open Science the attention they deserve” 2016-03-18 The Vice-Chancellor of Stockholm University, Astrid Söderbergh Widding, is one of Europe's Open Access Champions. She is a high level academic who advocate Open Access with no hesitation.
  • Euraxess 2018-03-20 Stockholm University has an agreement with the European research network EURAXESS.
  • Stockholms tunnelbanekarta. Foto: Mostphotos. Stockholm University swabs the Tube 2018-03-28 Researchers at Stockholm University are mapping microorganisms in the Stockholm metro as part of a project called MetaSUB, which covers 47 cities around the world.
  • European clean air policies unmask Arctic warming by greenhouse gases 2016-03-14 The drastic cut in sulfate particle emissions in Europe partly explains the amplified Arctic warming since the 1980s, shows a new study published in Nature Geoscience. The team, which consists of scientists from Stockholm University and the Norwegian Meteorological Institute, say that their surprising finding highlights an even more urgent need for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate Arctic climate change.
  • guppyhane Small brain is good for the immune system – if you are a fish 2016-03-29 A new study shows that guppies with smaller brains have stronger immune responses than guppies with larger brains.
  • selfie Brave new digital world 2016-02-17 Digital images have become a central part of contemporary perceptions of reality, Lisa Ehlin shows in her doctoral thesis.
  • Vasilis Koulolias. Photo: Eva Dalin. eGovlab develops online democracy 2016-02-16 eGovlab in Kista develops technology and smart processes for improving communication between citizens and public authorities. Starting at the beginning of next year, the EU project e-Skills Match will also be coordinated from here.
  • Research collaboration with Indonesia 2016-02-15 Researchers from Stockholm University, among other Swedish universities, will have the opportunity to discuss possible collaborations with colleagues in Indonesia at the next Swedish Academic Collaboration Forum in Yogyakarta.
  • Inventing new ways to produce proteins 2016-02-12 Hundreds of hours of work with instruments during Eric Johnston’s postdoc in New York gave birth to an idea of how proteins could be produced more efficiently. Now he is back at Stockholm University, has built up a new research branch in organic chemistry, and is hoping for his patent application to be approved soon.
  • Kilometertjockt istäcke över hela Norra ishavet för 140 000 år sedan Kilometre-thick ice covered the Arctic Ocean 140 000 years ago 2016-02-12 For the first time, researchers at Stockholm University, in collaboration with researchers in Gothenburg, United States and Russia, have been able to show that the Arctic Ocean was covered by a one kilometre thick layer of ice during glacial periods. The discovery provides, among other things, an insight into the stability of floating glacier ice of a type now mainly found around the Antarctic.
  • Maja Schlüter ERC Consolidator Grant to Maja Schlüter 2016-02-11 Maja Schlüter from the Stockholm Resilience Centre has been awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant worth SEK 18 million.
  • Piecing together the cells “elevator-like” mechanism for sodium 2016-02-02 Researchers from Stockholm University have pieced together how sodium is transported into and out of our cells. This could be a potential benefit for the development of novel treatments against some forms of cancer and hypertension.
  • Pressbild_EuroMed2k_2016 Recent summer temperatures in Europe are likely the warmest of the last two millennia 2016-02-01 Most of Europe has experienced strong summer warming over the course of the past several decades, accompanied by severe heat waves in 2003, 2010 and 2015.
  • New Nordic Centre of Excellence focusing on Arctic mining communities 2016-01-22 A Nordic Centre of Excellence funded by NordForsk will build an interdisciplinary research environment to provide new thinking about sustainable development, especially in the context of Arctic mining. The new centre is led by KTH Royal Institute of Technology in collaboration with Stockholm University and Stockholm Environment Institute.
  • Illustration Elvis-projektet Children in joint physical care have better health than children living with one parent 2016-01-21 In Sweden one in ten school children live in joint physical custody, that is, they move between their parents. The trend suggests that it will be even more common in the future. How do kids who move between their parents actually feel? A recently completed research project shows that they are fine compared to children living alone with one parent.
  • Meighan Boyd har studerat klimathistoria genom analys av droppstenar Stalagmites from Greek caves provide new climate information 2016-01-15 In order to understand how future climate change could influence human society, we first need to look back in time to how past societies responded to climate change. A new dissertation from the Department of Physical Geography looks at stalagmites from caves where people lived over 5000 years ago to find new pieces of this puzzle.
  • We eat better than kings of old 2016-01-11 Cooking is becoming more and more complex. The food you consume on a daily basis is more advanced than what kings used to eat, according to new research from Stockholm University.
  • Post-glaciala sjöar i Stordalen, Abisko. Foto: Jo Uhlbäck. Large methane emissions from northern lakes 2016-01-07 Climate-sensitive regions in the north are home to most of the world’s lakes. New research shows that these northern freshwaters are critical emitters of methane.
  • Grav 6 i Kumtepe. Foto: Project Troia, Peter Jablonka. The first European farmers are traced back to Anatolia 2016-01-11 When farming spread throughout Europe some 8000 years ago, Anatolia functioned as a hub, spreading genes and the new ideas westward. An international study coordinated from Stockholm and based on DNA from Anatolian remains indicates the importance of the role Anatolia played, and also in attracting attention both from the east and the west.
  • Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson Who were the first Vikings? 2016-01-07 A new research project will find out more about the first Vikings. The project has received 50 million SEK in research grants from the Swedish Research Council.
  • Online response could prevent suicide 2015-12-28 Suicidal persons often share their thoughts and plans online. A new study pubished in The British Journal of Psychiatry shows that the response they get is important.
  • Mohamed Bourennane, forskare vid Fysikum vill utveckla säker kommunikation genom kvantmekanik. Swedish researchers reveal security hole 2015-12-18 Quantum cryptography is considered a fully secure encryption method, but researchers from Stockholm University and Linköping University have discovered that this is not always the case. The results of their research have been published in Science Advances.
  • Augustinus-predikan (Sermo beati Augustini episcopi) i Piacenza, Biblioteca Capitolare. Unique text discovered in language research programme 2015-12-15 Only a few researchers in the past hundred years have discovered new texts written by the church father Augustine. Last winter, Brian Møller Jensen became the latest one. He is involved in Ars edendi, a philological research programme at the Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
  • Major investment in brain research 2015-12-15 Stockholm University Brain Imaging Centre will provide equipment for research on brain imaging in humans and animals. The research will cover linguistic and behavioural fields and be a multidisciplinary meeting place.
  • Johan Rockström optimistic about Paris Climate Conference 2015-12-08 We need an agreement good enough to hold the increase in global average temperature below two degrees, says Johan Rockström, leading scientist on global sustainability, about the Paris Climate Conference.
  • Havsbild Ocean toxicity hampered the rapid evolution of complex life 2015-12-04 By examining rocks at the bottom of ancient oceans, an international group of researchers have revealed that arsenic concentrations in the oceans have varied greatly over time. But also that in the very early oceans, arsenic co-varied with the rise of atmospheric oxygen and coincided with the coming and going of global glaciations.
  • Global sötvattenkonsumtion New study raises the global human freshwater footprint 2015-12-04 Dams and irrigation raise the global human consumption of freshwater to a much higher level than previously thought, according to research from Stockholm University. The results are published in the scientific journal Science.
  • Ilona Riipinen Ilona Riipinen: How are particles removed from the air and atmosphere? 2015-12-03 The amount of particles in the atmosphere is decisive for both our health and the Earth’s climate. Researchers have spent a great deal of time investigating what causes the emission of particles, but knowledge about how they leave the atmosphere is not as advanced. Ilona Riipinen, researcher at Stockholm University and new Wallenberg Academy Fellow, will now study how clouds and rain, for example, contribute to cleaner air.
  • Fataneh Farahani Fataneh Farahani: What are the limits and terms for hospitality? 2015-12-03 The refugee crisis is one of the most significant civil rights issues of our time. Fataneh Farahani, researcher at Stockholm University and new Wallenberg Academy Fellow, will compare the work with asylum seekers and migrants, and investigate what shapes hospitality in three multicultural cities: London, Stockholm and Sydney.
  • Emil Bergholtz. Emil Bergholtz: Mathematics that may lead the way to quantum computers 2015-12-03 If researchers succeed in building quantum computers, today’s computers will appear as hopelessly old fashioned as typewriters do now. Wallenberg Academy Fellow Emil Bergholtz is developing mathematical theories that may guide the development of a particular form of quantum matter, which has special properties that researchers believe may be a platform for quantum computers.
  • Kameran testas vid Följesjön i ett forskningsområde väster om Vänersborg (Skogaryds forskningsstation). New camera can measure methane 2015-12-01 A camera so advanced that it can photograph and film methane in the air around us is now presented by researchers Stockholm University and Linköping University. It can be an important part of the efforts to measure and monitor greenhouse gases. A study was recently published in Nature Climate Change.
  • Den asiatiska elefanten har de kortaste spermierna i förhållande till sin kroppsstorlek medan husmusen har de längsta . Människo- och elefantspermier är ungefär lika långa, mindre än hälften så långa som husmusens. Foto: Mostphotos. Fighting and Females Determine How Males Make Sperm 2015-11-18 Why do mice have longer sperm than elephants? A new study shows that the size of the female’s reproductive tract holds the key for understanding how males make sperm.
  • Sediment Melting Scandinavian ice provides missing link in Europe’s final Ice Age story 2015-11-18 Molecular-based moisture indicators, remains of midges and climate simulations have provided climate scientists with the final piece to one of the most enduring puzzles of the last Ice Age.
  • In the future you will pay extra for an offline bed 2015-11-13 What happens in the near future if the technical development continues in the present way? This question has been investigated by the research project Consumer-facing Internet of Things at the Stockholm University Mobile Life Centre. The result is a report – and a design fiction Ikea catalogue.
  • Osamu Terasaki New behavior of gases in metal-organic frameworks observed 2015-11-11 Metal-organic frameworks are materials useful for capturing and storing gas. An international team, led by scientists from Stockholm University and University of California, Berkeley, have been able to show how gases organize in the material, a completely new finding and important for further development. The result was recently published in the scientific journal Nature.
  • Eyjafjallajökull vid utbrottet den 16 maj 2010. Foto: Gunnlaugur Þór Briem. Volcanic eruptions have long-lasting global climate effects 2015-11-10 Strong volcanic eruptions at high-latitudes have large impacts on the global climate system that can last for several decades. This is shown in a new study from Stockholm University published in the scientific journal, PNAS
  • Toxins remain in your clothes 2015-10-23 Thousands of chemicals are used in clothes manufacturing. Researchers at Stockholm University have examined if there are chemicals in the clothes we buy as well.
  • Osamu Terasaki och Peter Oleynikov New crystal captures carbon from humid gas 2015-10-16 A new material with micropores might be a way to fight climate change. Scientists have created crystals that capture carbon dioxide much more efficiently than previously known materials, even in the presence of water. The research was recently published in a report in the scientific journal Science.
  • EU funding for non-animal chemical testing 2015-10-14 In a large international program called “EU-ToxRisk”, the European Commission grants 280 million SEK for developing alternatives to animal testing.
  • Researchers want to find what is uniquely human 2015-10-14 Why did humanity turn out so different from other animals? What is uniquely human? These are some of the questions that an interdisciplinary research team from Stockholm University has been awarded a SEK 22 million grant to attempt to answer.
  • Mohamed Bourennane, forskare vid Fysikum vill utveckla säker kommunikation genom kvantmekanik. Quantum physics to ensure secure communication 2015-10-14 Mohamed Bourennane, researcher at Stockholm University, wants to develop a completely secure way to transfer information while learning more about the basics of quantum physics. In order to do this, the research team has now been awarded a grant of about SEK 34 million.
  • Nobel Prize puts focus on the Antarctic ice 2015-10-08 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2015 to Takaaki Kajita, Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan and Arthur B. McDonald, Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Collaboration, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada for “for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass.
  • Breakthrough in understanding sugar uptake 2015-09-30 Researchers from Stockholm University, in international collaboration with UK and Japan, has reached a breakthrough in understanding how fructose is transported into our cells. This could be a potential benefit for the development of novel treatments against some forms of cancer, obesity and diabetes. The results are published as an article in the scientific journal Nature.
  • Open-plan offices more distracting for friendly personalities 2015-09-15 Large open-plan office provides more distractions and increase stress for employees. And most affected are those who are friendly, according to a new thesis from the Stress Research Institute at Stockholm University.
  • Stephen Hawking in Stockholm: ”Black holes ain’t as black as they are painted” 2015-08-27 There is a way out of black holes. That was the message communicated by Professor Stephen Hawking in a public lecture in Stockholm which attracted more than 3000 people to the audience.
  • Scientists on the way to Petermann glacier 2015-07-20 On July 27, Swedish polar scientists set off to Greenland to meet the icebreaker Oden in Thule. The mission this time is to examine the Petermann Glacier in north-western Greenland.
  • New family of chemical structures can effectively remove CO2 from gas mixtures 2015-07-15 A newly discovered family of chemical structures, published in Nature, could increase the value of biogas and natural gas that contains carbon dioxide.
  • Promoting healthy sleep may be an effective strategy to improve life at work 2015-07-06 A new study suggests that there may be a reciprocal, causal pathway between job strain and disturbed sleep, implying that interventions to treat sleep problems may improve work satisfaction.
  • Guppies Single gene controls fish intelligence 2015-06-26 The gene Angiopoietin-1 could play an important role in the brain development of other vertebrates, including humans.
  • Five factors for successful management of natural capital 2015-06-22 Study in PNAS teases out strategies for successful governance, for both people and ecosystems.
  • Norris damm Global freshwater consumption crossing its planetary boundary 2015-07-06 Planetary boundaries have been proposed to describe a safe operating space of humanity. Human consumption of freshwater is the used control variable for a freshwater planetary boundary. Research from Stockholm University is now showing that global freshwater consumption has already pushed beyond its boundary. The article is published in Science.
  • Navarino Environmental Observatory Environmental award to research observatory NEO 2015-06-10 Navarino Environmental Observatory (NEO), a research observatory at Stockholm University has been awarded the "Ecopolis Award 2015 for Environmental Projects" for its research on climate change in the Mediterranean region.
  • Elephant movement patterns mapped 2015-06-03 The elephant’s movement pattern has, for the first time, been studied with GPS tags in a previously unexplored area in western Tanzania. A thesis from Stockholm University shows that elephants move in the vicinity of the roads that park guard’s use, and avoid the areas where there is a greater risk of poaching.
  • Liying Jiang Neurotoxin found in commercial seafood 2015-06-03 Popular commercial seafood purchased from Swedish supermarkets at the Stockholm region contains Beta-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA), shows a doctoral thesis from Stockholm University. BMAA is a naturally-occurring amino acid with a possible link to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. It is the first screening study to measure BMAA in commercial seafood from metropolitan markets.
  • Greek research station NEO agreement renewed 2015-05-22 The Navarino Environmental Observatory (NEO), a cooperation between Stockholm University, the Academy of Athens and TEMES S.A., dedicated to research and education on climate and environment of the Mediterranean region, recently renewed its agreement to enable continued research collaboration.
  • Prehistoric DNA reveals dog origin 2018-03-28 Man's best friend, the dog, may have been around far longer than we thought. A new study shows that the dog's predecessor was separated from the wolf already sometime between 27 000 and 40 000 years ago.
  • Image made out of a simulation of a Type Ia supernova explodes (as shown in the dark brown color). Courtesy of Dan 
Kasen. Exploding star shocks its neighbor 2015-05-21 To quickly discover exploding stars opens new windows to study their nature. An early glimpse of ultraviolet light revealed a shocked neighboring star.
  • Sand-hopper (Gammarus locusta). Photo: Johan Eklöf. High biodiversity gives healthy seagrass beds 2015-05-20 Loss of algal-feeding invertebrates have surprisingly large effects on health of valuable seagrass meadows. These are the new results from a unique set of coordinated experiments.
  • Viking dragon head found at Birka 2018-03-28 Archaeologists from Stockholm University and Germany made an unexpected discovery last week when they were digging in the port of the Viking town of Birka, on Björkö in Lake Mälaren.
  • Ecosystem management that ignores “taboo tradeoffs” is likely to fail 2015-05-19 A new approach to reveal “taboo” and “tragic” tradeoffs may protect marginalized people and improve conservation success. This is shown by a team of researchers from Kenya, the UK, Sweden and Canada in an article in the journal “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences”.
  • Water droplet Stain- and waterproof clothing are harmful 2015-05-18 The Madrid Statement documents the scientific consensus on the potential for harm of highly fluorinated chemicals being used in stain- and waterproof clothing. Two hundred scientists from 38 countries, including several researchers from Department of Applied Environmental Science (ACES), Stockholm University have signed the Madrid Statement. In the document the scientists outline a roadmap to prevent further damage.
  • A big brain helps against predators 2015-05-15 Having a big brain may provide survival benefits, at least if you are a female guppy. A unique new study published in the journal Ecology Letters shows that guppy females with large brains are less likely to be eaten than females with smaller brains.
  • Joint physical custody less problematic than sole custody 2015-04-29 A new study on children’s living situation after a divorce has received international media attention. The study was recently profiled in the magazine Time. Joint custody seems to be less problematic than sole custody, the findings suggest.
  • Love Dalen with tusk in Siberia Woolly mammoth genomes mapped 2018-03-28 Before the world's last woolly mammoth took its final breath, the iconic animals had already suffered from a considerable loss of genetic diversity. These findings were made in the first ever publication of the full DNA sequence of the extinct animal by an international team of scientists from Stockholm University, the Swedish Museum of Natural History and Harvard Medical School among others.
  • Researchers may have discovered a new type of galaxy 2015-04-27 Researchers have found two galaxies that appear to consist of only hydrogen and helium. Galaxies lacking heavier elements than hydrogen and helium have never been observed before.
  • New discovery in old ring shows connection between the Vikings and Islam 2015-03-27 A new analysis shows an Arabic inscription on a Viking ring and only little wear on the ring. It may be a proof that there was a direct link between the Viking Age Scandinavia and Islam.
  • Fjällsjöar i Stordalen, Abisko. Foto: Brett Thornton. Northern lakes’ history can predict future methane emissions 2015-03-26 More and more methane gas is being released from northern lakes in Sweden. Now, a link has been found between methane bubbling and total summer sunshine. This new research result from Stockholm University enables improved predictions of future methane emissions.
  • Skövling av Amazonas. Foto: Daniel Nepstad The world’s most iconic ecosystems are at risk of collapse under climate change 2015-03-20 Today Friday 20 March a new study by a team of researchers is published in Science magazine. One of the researchers is Professor Carl Folke, Science Director at Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University.
  • New findings from DNA traces the emergence of languages 2015-03-13 Christos Economou, a PhD student at the Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies at Stockholm University is one of the researchers who participated in the international research team that did the study.
  • Guppy male with large brain most attractive 2015-03-17 A new study shows that guppy males with larger brains are more colorful and have bigger tails than those with smaller brains.
  • Leading climate Professor: Sweden is a model 2015-02-17 Emissions of carbon must be reduced and in this, Sweden can be a model. This was the message when climate Professor Raymond Pierrehumbert held a public lecture in the presence of King Carl XVI Gustaf.
  • Orangutang. Fotograf: Johan Lind New findings on animal memory 2015-02-06 A new study shows that all animals have equally bad short term memory. The only species that stands out is man.
  • Climate Professor aiming for zero emissions 2015-02-03 Chance took Ray Pierrehumbert to Stockholm where he fell for the city - and Sweden. On the King's environmental professorship, he now works on to illuminate the complex systems that explain the earth's climate and to get decision makers to switch to a fossil free society.
  • Andreas Fall Chemistry researcher awarded large scholarship 2015-01-29 The 2015 Alf de Ruvo scholarship worth SEK 500 000 has been awarded to Dr. Andreas Fall at the Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University. Andreas Fall is given the scholarship for his comprehensive mapping of colloid chemistry interactions in nanocellulose systems. The research may contribute to the development of entirely new materials.
  • The Wellness Syndrome 2015-01-29 Are you obsessed with maximising your individual health and happiness? According to researchers a new phenomenon is emerging which they call the wellness syndrome - an obsession with health that is often counter-productive.
  • First major analysis of Human Protein Atlas is published in Science 2015-01-23 A research article published in Science on 23 January presents the first major analysis based on the Human Protein Atlas, including a detailed picture of the proteins that are linked to cancer. Professor Gunnar von Heijne at Stockholm University is one of the co-authors of the article.
  • Grant for recruiting Nobel Prize Laureate 2015-01-19 The Swedish Research Council has decided on grants for recruitments of international outstanding researchers, out of which the Department of Physics at Stockholm University has received a contribution to recruit Professor Frank Wilczek who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2004.
  • Rural landscape. Photo: Sara Cousins Biodiversity threatened by twentieth century land-use change 2015-01-19 The magnitude of rural landscape change has been more dramatic than previously thought. A new large-scale study by researchers at Stockholm University shows that 96% of species-rich grassland has disappeared during the last 100 years, with serious consequences for plant biodiversity.
  • Four of nine planetary boundaries now crossed 2015-01-16 Four of nine planetary boundaries have now been crossed as a result of human activity, says an international team of 18 researchers with representatives from Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University in the journal Science, published 16 January. Crossing the boundaries could have serious consequences, both in the present and the future.
  • How to make China's aquaculture more sustainable 2015-01-09 Stockholm Resilience Centre researchers have written an article in the latest issue of Science on how China's aquaculture can tip the balance in world fish supplies and what can be done about it.
  • Jonas Larsson At absolute zero – studies of a different world 2014-12-22 Materials change their properties at extremely low temperatures; they stop following the traditional laws of physics and, instead, quantum mechanics takes over. As a Wallenberg Academy Fellow, Jonas Larson will use theoretical methods to study the different and exciting phenomena that occur close to absolute zero.
  • EMCDDA award 2014 goes to ALICE RAP paper 2015-01-16 The visiting research fellows Ludwig Kraus and Robin Room at Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), along with ten other European scientists working in the EC-funded ALICE RAP project were awarded a prestigious EMCDDA 2014 Scientific Paper Prize.
  • Using ground-penetrating radar. Photo: Martin Rundkvist. Major Viking Hall Identified in Sweden 2014-12-08 A Viking feasting hall measuring almost 50 metres in length has been identified near Vadstena in Sweden. Archaeologists from Stockholm University and Umeå University used ground-penetrating radar, a non-invasive geophysical method, to locate and map the house foundation.
  • New discovery concerning glucose uptake in brown fat could treat type 2 diabetes 2014-11-10 Researchers at Stockholm University have discovered a new mechanism that stimulates glucose uptake in brown fat.
  • Inauguration of New Professors and Conferment of Doctoral Degrees 2019-08-15 The combined ceremony for the conferment of doctoral degrees and inauguration of new professors will take place on Friday 27th September 2019 at 5 p.m. in Stockholm City Hall.
  • 103 million SEK to research in Science and Technology 2014-11-05 The Swedish Research Council call for project funding for Science and Technology has awarded Stockholm University 34 projects grants totaling 103.2 million SEK.
  • Large grant to research on the sense of smell 2014-10-29 The Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation has decided to award nearly SEK 300 million to research in the humanities and social sciences. A total of 67 projects, including three major research programmes, have been granted funding.
  • EU funding: “Network and learn the system” 2014-10-29 The research idea is crucial for receiving EU funding, but you also have to know the system and be able to network, according to expert Sean McCarthy.
  • Concentrated effort to gain new knowledge about membrane-bound proteins 2014-10-24 A large grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation to researcher David Drew at Stockholm University has enabled four research teams to proceed to develop new methods for determining the structure of human membrane proteins and their dynamic functions.
  • Large grant awarded for new method of protein structure determination 2014-10-24 Increased knowledge of how cells produce proteins, and the three-dimensional structure of these proteins, is of great importance to both basic research in biology and the development of medicine. Professor Gunnar von Heijne at Stockholm University has been granted a total sum of SEK 66 million for a new protein structure determination laboratory. In addition, he has been awarded a continuation grant for Wallenberg Advanced Bioinformatics Infrastructure (WABI) at SciLifeLab.
  • Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals 2014-10-28 Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers’ instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a selection of hand blenders which are available on the Swedish market.
  • Two researchers comment the Nobel Prize in Literature 2014 2018-04-09 On October 10, it was announced that the French writer Patrick Modiano is awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Literature. Two researchers at Stockholm University comment on the election and talk about their research on Modiano.
  • Center for Toxicological Sciences, Swetox, inaugurated 2014-10-08 This Tuesday Swetox, Center for Toxicological Sciences, was inaugurated at Astra Zeneca's former premises in Södertälje. This collaboration between eleven Swedish universities will conduct innovative interdisciplinary basic research, applied research and other business services and even coordinate programs at the masters and doctoral level, including graduate school.
  • High retention is shown with a higher relief upwards. Areas where residence times depend on temperature are yellow (weak) to red (strong), those depending stronger on precipitation turquoise to blue Both precipitation and temperature control land carbon cycling 2014-10-03 Precipitation is at least as important as temperature in determining the turnover time of carbon, states a new report published in Nature. The report also establishes that overall more carbon than what was previously thought is stored in land ecosystems – especially in soil.
  • Polar research expedition goes ashore 2014-10-06 The international research expedition SWERUS-C3 that has been in the Arctic Ocean is now coming ashore after about 100 days at sea. The exciting process to evaluate all data will now take over. - The material will be able to provide new perspectives on the Arctic sea ice development history and gas hydrates stability along the Arctic continental shelves, says Martin Jakobsson, Professor at Stockholm University.
  • Linnaeus environments at the highest international level 2014-09-24 The Swedish Research Council and Formas have conducted a midterm evaluation of the 20 Linnaeus environments that were granted funding in 2008. Two research environments at Stockholm University received Linnaeus grants in 2008: the Linnaeus Centre on Social Policy and Family Dynamics in Europe – Stockholm University (SPaDE) and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics – Stockholm University (OKC). Both have now been evaluated and given excellent ratings.
  • Mothers with intellectual disabilities can have children with secure attachment 2014-09-23 In the first scientific study worldwide on attachment among children of mothers with mild intellectual disabilities (ID), researchers at Stockholm and Uppsala University report that a substantial proportion of these children harbor secure attachment representations and that only a small minority have disorganized attachment representations.
  • Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland 2014-09-22 The chemistry of groundwater changed prior to two consecutive earthquakes in northern Iceland, reports a study published online this week in Nature Geoscience. The study was led by scientists in Sweden and Iceland.
  • Watch the Polar researcher elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2014-09-17 Professor Örjan Gustafsson has recently been elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. A few weeks ago he returned home from the first leg of the Polar research expedition Swerus-C3. On September 18 you can watch him live on the academic talkshow Crosstalks, talking about his research.
  • Gustaf Arrhenius appointed as new director of the Institute for Futures Studies in Stockholm 2014-09-11 Gustaf Arrhenius, Professor of Practical Philosophy at Stockholm University, is known for his research on our moral obligations to future generations and on issues in democratic theory. On November the 1st, he will assume the position as director of the Institute for Futures Studies, based in Stockholm.
  • Sino-Swedish workshop on the environmental issues in the Yangtze river 2014-09-08 During the week 8-12 September, researchers from China and Sweden will meet at Stockholm University to discuss environmental quality in the Yangzte.
  • Young researcher at ITM received award for “significant research contribution to aerosol science” 2014-09-01 Associate Professor Ilona Riipinen at the Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM) & Bert Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, received the Smoluchowski Award during the Annual European Aerosol Conference in Busan, Korea.
  • Kebnekaise south peak is melting at record speed 2014-08-28 Kebnekaise is the highest mountain in Sweden. Now there is only 70 centimeters difference between the South and North peaks. The South peak measured to 2097.5 meters above sea level at this year’s annual measurement of the peaks, performed at the end of each summer season by Stockholm University research station Tarfala.
  • Stockholm University recruits top researcher 2014-08-25 The Swedish Research Council has decided on a research grant to Stockholm University for Professor John Wettlaufer, to do research at Stockholm University and Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics.
  • Researchers on the Oden. Photo: Jorien Vonk Half time for the Polar expedition SWERUS-C3 2014-08-19 The first leg of the International Polar research expedition SWERUS-C3 is approaching its end. In the beginning of next week, the expedition is expected in Barrow, Alaska to change researchers and crew.
  • New international study into the link between human activities and cloud formation 2014-08-06 This summer the Cloud and Aerosol Experiment Åre (CAESAR) was launched which aims to better understand the influence of human activities on the composition of the air and microphysical properties of clouds. The project is a collaboration between Departement of Applied Environmental Science (ITM) at Stockholm University, the Finnish Meteorological Institute and the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland.
  • University researcher won competition in protein structure prediction 2014-07-18 A research group at SciLifeLab, led by Jens Carlsson at Stockholm University, has won a worldwide competition (GPCR DOCK 2013) to predict the three-dimensional structure of a G protein-coupled receptor using computer modeling. Their results are published in two articles in the scientific journal Structure.
  • SWERUS-C3 scientists begin methane measurements in outer Laptev Sea 2014-07-18 After nine days in transit, the Arctic expedition SWERUS-C3 has reached the first sampling station located in the Nansen Basin-Laptev Sea. The researchers focus on measuring methane emissions in the outer Laptev Sea. Areas where methane is “bubbling up” from the seabed will be studied in detail to understand how this system functions today.
  • SWERUS-C3 en route to the Arctic Ocean: the final hours before cast-off 2014-07-15 After four years of intensive preparations, SWERUS-C3, a polar expedition to the East Siberian Arctic Ocean and its adjacent continental slope, finally kicked off on 5 July from Tromsø, Norway. Under a beating sun spirits were running high and a surge of excitement was taking hold of researchers and crew on board the icebreaker Oden.
  • Top recruitment in Theoretical Physics 2014-07-07 Another top recruitment has been secured by Stockholm University with a grant from the Swedish Research Council's program for international recruitment of leading researchers.
  • Small crustaceans help us assess the effects of pollution and oxygen deficiency in the Baltic sea 2014-06-18 Two of the most pressing environmental problems in the Baltic Sea are pollution and oxygen deficiency. Despite this, our knowledge about how this affects the animals living in the sea is limited. To test the single and combined effects of polluted sediment and oxygen deficiency on benthic organisms small crustaceans (Monoporeia affinis) from the Baltic Sea were studied in experiments. These crustaceans were demonstrated to have a defence mechanism against the cellular damage that changes in water oxygen concentrations can induce. Exposure to polluted sediment was also shown to activate these defence mechanisms.
  • Population Modeling: a “new era” in environmental protection? 2014-06-03 Models that can project the effects of contaminants on populations of organisms may help fulfill goals set for environmental risk assessment, shows a new PhD thesis from Stockholm University. These findings could help improve the way we assess the hazards that contaminants may pose to the environment.
  • Genomic Diversity and Admixture differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian Foragers and Farmers 2014-04-30 An international team led by researchers at Uppsala University and Stockholm University reports a breakthrough on understanding the demographic history of Stone-Age humans. A genomic analysis of eleven Stone-Age human remains from Scandinavia revealed that expanding Stone-age farmers assimilated local hunter-gatherers and that the hunter-gatherers were historically in lower numbers than the farmers. The study is published, ahead of print, in the journal Science.
  • Honorary doctorates 2014 2014-04-15 Stockholm University has now chosen this year’s honorary doctors, all of whom have contributed in distinctive ways to the University's activities in research and education. Prominent names include Eleanor Sharpston, Advocate General at the Court of Justice of the European Union, and the renowned French philosopher Francois Recanati. Within the humanities, in addition to Recanati, recipients of this year’s honorary doctorates include Elaine Aston and Patricia K. Kuhl; in the social sciences: Sandra Wallman and Marie-Laure Djelic; and in the natural sciences: Maria João Ramos, Lynne B. McCusker, Walter Neupert and Thomas Rossby.
  • Poor mimics can succeed as long as they mimic the right trait 2014-04-10 There are both perfect and imperfect mimics in nature. An imperfect mimic might have a different body shape, size or colour pattern arrangement compared to the species it mimics. Researchers have long been puzzled by the way poor mimicry can still be effective in fooling predators not to attack. In the journal Current Biology, researchers from Stockholm University now present a novel solution to the question of imperfect mimicry.
  • Deer droppings good for biodiversity 2014-04-08 By collecting deer droppings, and then growing the seeds found within, researchers from Stockholm University have been able to see how deer spread different types of plants.
  • Increased collaboration with the Stockholm Environment Institute 2014-04-04 Stockholm University and the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) recently signed an agreement to increase collaboration.
  • Updated map of ocean floors 2014-04-03 A new version of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) is now available. This is the third version, and once again, researchers at the Department of Geological Sciences at Stockholm University have played a prominent role.
  • Crystal structure of human MTH1 in complex with a key inhibitor. New concept for the treatment of cancer 2014-04-03 A team of researchers from five Swedish universities have identified a new way of treating cancer. The concept is presented in the journal Nature and is based on inhibiting a specific enzyme called MTH1, which cancer cells, unlike normal cells, require for survival. The research group at Stockholm University has determined the structure of MTH1 and made detailed structural studies important for the development of efficient inhibitors targeting MTH1.
  • Mats Nilsson appointed Site Director at SciLifeLab in Stockholm 2014-04-02 Mats Nilsson, professor at the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at Stockholm University, has been appointed Site Director for SciLifeLab in Stockholm. The decision was made by the Vice-Chancellors of Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University. Mats commenced his duties at SciLifeLab from 1 April.
  • Nina Kirchner är universitetslektor i numerisk modellering av inlandsisar och arbetar med MUST. Large-scale investment in study of inaccessible marine areas 2014-04-03 A national infrastructure for studying hard conditions in the ocean is now being created with support from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation. University of Gothenburg, Chalmers and Stockholm University are behind the consortium MUST, Mobile Underwater System Tools, now assigned to SEK 38 million.
  • Wallenberg funding to mathematics researchers 2014-03-31 In order for Sweden to regain an international, cutting edge position in mathematics, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, in cooperation with the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, is supporting prominent researchers in mathematics. Two researchers now receiving research funding are Per Alexandersson at Stockholm University and Christiane Tretter who is at present Professor at the University of Bern, Switzerland and soon to be visiting Professor at Stockholm University.
  • New centre for the ethics of war and peace 2014-03-26 Why do different ethical rules apply in war and peace? A new centre has been established at the University seeking to explore the reasons for these differences.
  • Johan Kuylenstierna Sweden’s top environmental influencer 2014-03-26 Two scientists at Stockholm University have been named as the top two environmental influencers in Sweden, according to the Swedish magazine Miljöaktuellt, "Environment News". The top influencer is Johan Kuylenstierna, Director of the Stockholm Environment Institute and Adjunct Professor at Stockholm University. The number two influenser is Johan Rockström, Director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre and Professor of Environmental Science at Stockholm University.
  • Stora bilden: SN2014J I den dammiga galaxen M82 (foto: J. Johansson). Övre bilden till höger: Detaljerad infraröd bild från Keck-teleskopet på Hawaii, används för att lokalisera explosionsplatsen. Undre högra bilden: SN2014J:s position före explosionen (foto: A. O’Conell och M. Mountain). Supernova explosion provides clues into expansion of cosmos 2014-03-21 Observations of the supernova SN2014J, which exploded on January 14, provide important clues into the nature of these explosions, as well as the accelerated expansion of the cosmos. The observations have been made by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) team and led by Ariel Goobar from the Oskar Klein Centre at Stockholm University.
  • Image of supernova explosion by Hubble Space Telescope 2014-02-27 On 27 February, the Hubble Space Telescope News Center published a composite image of the supernova explosion, SN2014J, in the M82 galaxy.
  • New study shows connection between olfactory impairment and later dementia 2014-02-27 A unique new study shows a connection between olfactory impairment and later dementia. Self-reported olfactory impairment and/or an inability to identify odors can be an early sign of dementia conversion within the next ten years. The study is the first of its kind to follow people from healthy ageing to dementia, focusing on olfactory impairment.
  • University receives 125 million SEK to recruit top researcher 2014-03-31 Stockholm University has received 125 million SEK from the Swedish Research Council as part of their programme to recruit distinguished researchers. The funding will be used to appoint Anders Nilsson, currently at Stanford University, to join Stockholm University, and will be spread out during a ten-year period.
  • Matthias Danninger from Stockholm University with one of the sensors immersed in ice. Photo: Chad Finley Swedish researchers in physics breakthrough 2013-12-17 Swedish researchers from Stockholm University and Uppsala University have played a significant role in the IceCube research project, dubbed by Physics World as the “breakthrough of the year”. Scientists have made the first observation of cosmic neutrinos, thereby opening “a new window on the universe”.
  • Detailed cancer diagnostics with new analysis method 2013-12-03 New cancer treatments require good prior characterization of the tumour. Today, molecular diagnostics is time-consuming work, and important knowledge is still lacking when it comes to how drugs should best be used for individual patients. Scientists at the Science for Life Laboratory in Uppsala and Stockholm have now developed a new technique for discovering mutations in cancer tissues. The study is now published in Oncotarget.
  • The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013. Illustration: © Johan Jarnestad/The Royal Swedish Academy of Science. Physics Nobel Laureates François Englert and Peter Higgs visit Albanova 2013-12-10 On December 7, this year’s Nobel Laureates in Physics, Prof. Peter Higgs and Prof. François Englert, visited AlbaNova for a reception and panel discussion. The panel discussion, which took place in the Oskar Klein auditorium at Alba Nova University Center. focused on the importance of the new boson and its discovery.
  • Orjan Gustafsson (left) and Martin Kruså take sediment samples in the sea north of Siberia during the arctic expedition, 2008. Photo: Jorien Vonk Methane bubbling from thawed subsea permafrost in Arctic Siberia 2013-12-02 In this week’s issue of Nature Geoscience, a Russian-US-Swedish study show extensive release of the powerful greenhouse gas methane from the East Siberian Arctic Seas, a shallow coastal ocean covering an area equivalent to four times the area of Sweden.
  • Image: These maps show how the sky looks at gamma-ray energies above 100 million electron volts (MeV). Left: The sky during a three-hour interval prior to the detection, showing the normal appearance of the sky. Right: A three-hour interval starting 2.5 hours before the burst and ending 30 minutes into the event, illustrating its brightness relative to the rest of the gamma-ray sky. The gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was located in the constellation Leo near its border with Ursa Major, whose brightest stars form the familiar Big Dipper. 
Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration Cosmic flash highlights flaws in theories about our Universe 2013-11-22 An international team of researchers, including members from Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, has observed one of the most powerful cosmic explosions yet measured. The results are difficult to explain with any existing model, showing that we have a long way to go before understanding the most extreme events in our Universe. The findings are published in two articles in this week's edition of the journal Science.
  • Åke Bergman takes samples with Chinese researchers. Photo: Birgitta Bergman Sweden-China environmental collaboration awarded SEK 24 million 2013-11-21 Professor Åke Bergman, of the Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, has been awarded a Swedish Research Council framework grant of SEK 24,078,000 for a Sino-Swedish project on environmental monitoring and chemical analysis of environmental contaminants in the Yangtze River Delta region.
  • PFAA levels in Swedish otters on the rise 2013-11-14 Concentrations of perfluoroalkyl acids, or PFAAs, in the liver of otters from Sweden have steadily been increasing over the last 40 years despite the reduction in PFAA emissions, shows a new study published in the journalEnvironmental Science & Technology this week. The upward trend is of "great concern for the Scandinavian otter populations," write scientists from ITM and colleagues from the Swedish Museum of Natural History.
  • Large grant to Stockholm University for supernova research 2013-11-05 Stockholm University has received a large grant for supernova research. A research team led by Professor Jesper Sollerman from the Department of Astronomy has received SEK 33 million from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation to study supernova explosions.
  • Nanouschka Myrberg Burström. Foto: Eva Dalin Archaeology that elicits stories from coin treasures 2013-11-05 Many people find old coins fascinating. To Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, they are also a window to our ancestors’ ways of socialising and thinking. The coins can reveal political and cultural processes, human traditions, or the fate of certain families.
  • Prehistoric population patterns subject of new research project 2013-10-28 Researchers from Stockholm University and Uppsala University are to undertake a six-year interdisciplinary research project investigating prehistoric population patterns using genetic data from 400 prehistoric individuals. Last week it was revealed that the Riksbankens Jubileumsfond has awarded SEK 35.4 million for the research programme, "Atlas of prehistoric human genome in Sweden ".
  • A new take on efficient delivery in regenerative medicine 2013-10-23 An international research group has successfully tested the use of a new type of porous material for the efficient delivery of key molecules to transplanted cells derived from stem cells. These results can lead to improvements in the way stem cell-based neurodegenerative diseases are treated.
  • At the centre of the Crab nebula — the remnant of a supernova that exploded nearly 1,000 years ago — a spinning, magnetized neutron star is slowly injecting energy into the surrounding gas cloud, lighting it up. A similar, but more extreme, physical process may explain the super-luminous supernovae observed by Nicholl and colleagues. A neutron star spinning ten times faster than the one in the Crab nebula, and with magnetic fields 100 times stronger, would inject its spin energy much more rapidly, within a few months, and shine more than a million times more brightly.
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X-RAY: NASA/CXC/SAO/F. SEWARD; OPTICAL: NASA/ESA/ASU/J. HESTER & A. LO LL; INFRARED: NASA/JPL-CALTECH/UNIV. MINN./R. GEHRZ The brightest explosions in the Universe 2013-10-21 A paper published in Nature today, led by scientists at Queen’s University, and with co-authors from the Oskar Klein centre at Stockholm University, sheds new light on the brightest supernovae yet discovered in the Universe. The article proposes that these enigmatic explosions could well be powered by neutron stars with gigantic magnetic fields that spin hundreds of times a second, rather than the previously held view of pair-instability catastrophes.
  • François Englert, Rolf Heuer (CERN 's Director General) and Peter Higgs at the press conference held in Aula Magna. Photo: Abha Eli Phoboo Physics Prize: Stockholm University researchers active at CERN 2013-10-08 François Englert and Peter W. Higgs are jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 for the theory of how particles acquire mass. Both took part in this summer's major physics conference at Stockholm University's Aula Magna. Several researchers at the University are also active in the work of the CERN laboratory which confirmed the existence of the Higgs particle.
  • Gunhild Rosqvist and Torbjörn Karlin taking measurements at Kebnekaise.
Photo: Matthias Rieckh The battle for Sweden's highest peak 2013-09-16 Kebnekaise, Sweden's highest peak, has now reached its lowest level since measurements began in 1902. This result was discovered during the traditional measurement of Kebnekaise, carried out at the end of each summer season at Tarfala, Stockholm University's research centre. The south peak was measured at 2,099 metres above sea level; just 2.7 metres now separates the south peak from the north peak, which measures 2,096.3 metres.
  • New app to live toxic free 2013-09-13 Researchers at ITM have developed an app to inform and guide consumers through the maze of hazardous chemicals in popular consumer products.
  • Örjan Gustafsson, Professor of Biogeochemistry. Photo: Stella Papadopoulou New insights into the Arctic permafrost carbon complexities 2013-08-29 Permafrost thawing and the release of carbon stored in it can generate greenhouse gases that, in turn, reinforce global warming. However, the extent of this reinforcing effect has been heatedly debated over the years. This week, in an article published as a Correspondence in Nature Geoscience, scientists from Stockholm University and Utrecht University highlight the need to broaden our perspective on the climate feedback potential of thawing Arctic permafrost. They particularly stress the role of the interplay between large-scale carbon- and water cycles in the Arctic permafrost carbon feedback.
  • Kebnekaise's south peak photographed from the north peak on August 9th 2012. Photographer Gunhild Rosqvist. Kebnekaise record low 2013-08-13 In early August this year the south peak of Kebnekaise was measured from the Tarfala valley. Results show that the south peak is at its lowest yet recorded height, in a series of measurements dating back to 1968, as well as a number of previous surveys beginning in 1947.
  • Researchers constrain the sources air pollution from China 2013-08-08 Particulate air pollution from incomplete combustion is affecting climate over East Asia more than carbon dioxide and cause premature deaths of over half a million annually in China alone, yet its sources have been poorly understood.
  • New method reads the genetic code directly in tumour tissue 2013-07-15 Accurate diagnostic tests are crucial when choosing the right treatment regime for cancer patients. This is why scientists from Stockholm University and Uppsala University continuously work on improving methods for analysing cancer tissues. For the first time, it is now possible to read the genetic code of individual cancer cells in their original location in the tissue. The results are published in Nature Methods.
  • Research communication needed for the Baltic Sea 2013-07-08 Increased information regarding what research says about the state of the Baltic Sea is crucial for politicians in order to take the decisions needed to save the Baltic Sea. That was the key message at a seminar organized by the Baltic Sea Centre at Stockholm University during Almedalsveckan.
  • Inefficient EU securities market facing a crossroads 2013-07-03 Compared with the US, the securities market in the EU is less economically efficient. This is because the regulatory system and the technical infrastructure for securities transactions differ between the two trade areas. Thomas Ordeberg has established this in a new doctoral dissertation from the Faculty of Law, Stockholm University. In the dissertation he also gives an account of what options the EU has available to make its securities market more efficient. Thomas Ordeberg is desk officer at the Ministry of Finance.
  • A Midsummer Day’s treat: Saharan dust over Stockholm 2013-06-28 On 21 June, while Sweden was swept away by the festivities of Midsummer Day, the optical remote sensing instrument known as LIDAR on the roof of the Arrhenius Laboratory heralded the arrival of strange visitors, the likes of whom scientist are not used to see roaming the skies of Stockholm: mineral dust from, none other than, the Sahara Desert.
  • Storspigg. Foto: Johan Lind Humans cause rapid evolution in Baltic Sea fish 2013-06-25 In a new dissertation, Emma Lind shows that the three-spined stickleback fish have developed genetically in a short time in response to the environmental impact of humans.
  • Photo: private Major EU grant for research on arsenic and the origin of life 2017-11-06 Ernest Chi Fru has been awarded a prestigious ERC grant to examine the distribution of arsenic in the world’s oceans two to three billion years ago.
  • Being well received in care speeds up healing process 2013-06-06 A placebo can activate a number of biological mechanisms in the same way that medicine can, which is why we are now beginning to understand why a placebo can heal and alleviate symptoms. Psychosocial factors, such as words or how a person is received, can help to heal or bring relief. These findings are being presented by the Italian researcher Fabrizio Benedetti, who is the keynote speaker at the PNIRS 20th Scientific Meeting in Stockholm on Thursday, June 6.
  • The Zeppelin Observatory, Svalbard. At 474m (1600ft) above sea level, the Zeppelin Observatory is located in an undisturbed arctic environment near Ny-Ålesund in Svalbard. Carbon dioxide passes symbolic milestone 2013-06-05 Readings taken by Stockholm University scientists at the Zeppelin Observatory near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, revealed that global carbon dioxide (CO2) levels topped symbolically important milestone for five consecutive months since the beginning of 2013.
  • Photo: Johan Gummås Unravelling the mystery of dead elk in southern Sweden 2013-05-31 Numerous dead elk (moose, in North America) keep cropping up in southern Sweden. Researchers at Stockholm University launched a new study into this worrying trend and hint towards thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency syndrome as a likely culprit.
  • Pioneering discoveries on the brain and immune defense 2013-05-29 It’s true that the brain governs the body, but the body also governs the brain, for example when the immune defense system makes us rest when we’re sick.
  • Foto: Håkan Lindgren The Norway spruce genome sequenced 2013-05-23 Researchers from Stockholm University have made significant contributions to the mapping of the gene sequence of the Norway spruce (the Christmas tree).
  • Young teenagers playing violent video games become accustomed to violence 2013-05-20 Young teenagers who play a lot of violent video games show blunted physiological and emotional responses to playing violent games, according a study from Stockholm University.
  • Regional climate changes over the last 2,000 years mapped for the first time 2013-05-16 An international team of 78 researchers from 24 countries have joined forces to learn how temperature has changed in the past 1- 2,000 years at the continental scale.
  • Human cultural capacities are older than 170,000 years 2013-05-08 Researchers at Stockholm University have used methodology from evolutionary biology together with observations from genetics, paleoanthropology, archaeology and linguistics to determine that human capacities for culture must be more than 170,000 years old.
  • Rune stone rediscovered after 300 years 2013-04-26 A nearly 1,000 year-old rune stone has been rediscovered at Bogesunds brygga west of Vaxholm. The rune stone was found during an excursion which was part of a course in landscape archeology at Stockholm University.
  • Swedish study suggests reduced risk of dementia 2013-04-19 A new Swedish study published in the journal Neurology shows that the risk of developing dementia may have declined over the past 20 years, in direct contrast to what many previously assumed. The result is based on data from SNAC-K, an ongoing study on aging and health that started in 1987.
  • Scent of a woman - not that feminine 2013-04-18 In stores, most perfumes are categorized as either feminine or masculine, but a new dissertation from Stockholm University shows that many perfumes are perceived as "unisex", and that these are the scents preferred by most people.
  • Karta över havsbottnen runt Antarktis. New map of the sea floor around Antarctica 2013-04-11 A new digital bathymetric model and map of the sea surrounding the Antarctic continent has been completed within the project "The International bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO)". The map, bathymetric model and the underlying database is a result of a collaboration between 30 institutions from 15 different nations.
  • Dirty dishes show Ice Age hunters’ taste for fish 2013-04-11 Hunters and gatherers who lived during the Ice Age made pottery vessels for cooking fish, according to a new international study, published today in Nature. Researchers have analysed food residues found in pottery vessels, up to 15,000 years old. This has resulted in the hitherto oldest direct evidence of prehistoric vessel use.
  • Lya i blått. Här kan man se hur galaxen badar i ett blått och diffust moln av Lyman alfa.
Foto: M. Hayes. Unique study shows light’s (roundabout) way through galaxies 2013-04-05 Researchers working in the international LARS project at Stockholm University have published a unique and comprehensive study on starburst galaxies.
  • Democratic Revolutions: Patience Pays 2013-03-20 Before the 20th century, the path to democracy was more than half a century long. Today, the process can be very rapid. However, democracies with lengthy transitions survive longer. This is shown in a scientific paper in Technological Forecasting and Social Change, where researchers at Stockholm University have analysed all the transitions between autocracy and democracy that have ever taken place.
  • Avtalet med Hirosakiuniversitetet undertecknas. Radiation biologists study health effects of Fukushima 2013-03-19 Radiation biologists at Stockholm University are cooperating with Japanese colleagues to study the health effects after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, two years ago.
  • X-ray laser reveals chemical reaction 2013-03-18 What happens when a chemical bond is broken? That question was recently answered with the help of a so-called free electron x-ray laser, which makes it possible to follow in real time how bonds in a molecule are changed and broken. The study, published in Science, found, among other things, evidence of a much-discussed intermediate state before molecules bind to or leave a metal surface. The possibility of monitoring at the molecular level how the electronic structure changes during a chemical reaction creates entirely new opportunities for investigating and understanding key chemical processes in detail.
  • Newfound signal may shed light on dark matter 2013-02-22 At the Oskar Klein Centre at Stockholm University, researchers are working intensively to examine data from a signal with light particles from space that may provide answers to some of the mysteries of dark matter.
  • Denny Vågerö, professor of medical sociology at CHESS. Growing health gap between educational groups 2013-02-06 Professor Denny Vågerö at CHESS is one of the researchers behind a study showing a growing health gap between educational groups.
  • New research vessel in the Baltic Sea 2013-02-04 The Erling-Persson Family Foundation has given a grant of SEK 30 million to Stockholm University to build a new ice-going research vessel. The vessel will be stationed at Stockholm University’s marine field station, the Askö Laboratory, located in the archipelago of Trosa.
  • New research project examines changes in family formation and social policies across Europe 2013-01-31 Are existing social and family policies compatible with changes in family patterns? Livia Oláh will coordinate a major European research project investigating the diversity of family forms, relationships and life courses in Europe in relation to policies.
  • NEEM ice core drilling project på nordvästra Grönland. Foto: Sune Olander Rasmussen, NEEM ice core drilling project. A warmer Greenland 2013-01-24 A new study provides surprising details on changes in the Earth’s climate during the Eemian interglacial period, more than 100,000 years ago.
  • Photo: Ronnit Hasson Stress makes exhausted women over-sensitive to sounds 2013-01-14 Women suffering from stress-related exhaustion exhibit hypersensitivity to sounds when exposed to stress. In some cases, a sound level corresponding to a normal conversation can be perceived as painful. This according to a study from Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University’s Stress Research Institute which tested sensitivity to sounds immediately after a few minutes’ artificially induced stress.
  • Illustration: P.B Holliland New research changes the image of the typical computer gamer 2013-01-14 The image of the computer gamer as a young male loner who spends hours playing computer games with strangers around the world, is not true, according to a new dissertation.
  • Accommodation for visiting researchers 2018-05-25 Stockholm University lets and manages a number of furnished rooms and flats owned by other landlords in Stockholm. These are available to foreign researchers with a doctoral degree and doctoral candidates at Stockholm University.
  • 10 new honorary doctors for 2011 2011-10-24 Honorary degrees were awarded to 10 outstanding individuals on Friday 30 September 2011, during the inauguration and graduation ceremony that took place in the beautiful surroundings of Stockholm City Hall.