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Magnus Bygren. Foto: Stockholms universitet

Magnus Bygren

Professor

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Arbetar vid Sociologiska institutionen
Telefon 08-16 34 97
E-post magnus.bygren@sociology.su.se
Besöksadress Universitetsvägen 10 B, plan 9
Rum B 920
Postadress Sociologiska institutionen 106 91 Stockholm

Undervisning

Magnus Bygren undervisar på kursen Kvantitativ analys, vilken ingår i Sociologi II. Han handleder också på alla nivåer. 

Forskning

Magnus Bygrens forskning följer för närvarande tre delvis överlappande teman: (1) förekomsten och omfattningen av diskriminering på olika områden, (2) följderna av föräldraskap för mäns och kvinnors karriärer och (3) orsaker till skolsegregering. Metodologiskt använder han sig av kvantitativa metoder, på senare tid alltmer av experimentella och därmed besläktade ansatser.

 

 

Publikationer

I urval från Stockholms universitets publikationsdatabas
  • 2018. Maria Brandén, Magnus Bygren, Michael Gähler. Population, Space and Place

    It is well known that couples tend to relocate for the sake of the man's career rather than the woman's, also known as the “trailing spouse phenomenon.” The role of employer choices in this process is unknown however. If employers are hesitant to make job offers to women who live a long way from the workplace (e.g., because of work–family balance concerns or a perceived risk that they will not follow through on their applications, or stay hired if employed), this tendency might constitute an underlying mechanism behind the moving premium of partnered men. Ours is the first study to empirically test whether employers prefer geographically distant men over geographically distant women. We sent applications for 1,410 job openings in the Swedish labour market, randomly assigning gender and parental status to otherwise equivalent applications from cohabiting or married women and men and recorded employer callbacks to these. The results indicate that employers in general tend to disfavour job applicants who live a long way from the employer's workplace. This tendency is stronger for women, both for mothers and for women with no children. Our estimated effects are imprecise but clearly suggest that employer recruitment choices contribute to the trailing spouse phenomenon by offering men a larger pool of geographically distant jobs. We call for more research on this hitherto ignored mechanism behind the trailing spouse phenomenon.

  • 2017. Magnus Bygren, Erlandsson Anni, Michael Gähler. European Sociological Review 33 (3), 337-348

    In research on fatherhood premiums and motherhood penalties in career-related outcomes, employers’ discriminatory behaviours are often argued to constitute a possible explanation for observed gender gaps. However, there is as yet no conclusive evidence of such discrimination. Utilizing a field experiment design, we test (i) whether job applicants are subject to recruitment discrimination on the basis of their gender and parenthood status, and (ii) whether discrimination by gender and parenthood is conditional on the qualifications required by the job applied for. We applied for 2,144 jobs in the Swedish labour market, randomly assigning gender and parenthood status to fictitious job applicants. Based on the rate of callbacks, we do not find that employers practise systematic recruitment discrimination on the basis of the job applicants’ gender or parental status, neither in relation to less qualified nor more highly qualified jobs.

  • 2017. Magnus Bygren, Ryszard Szulkin. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 45 (17), 50-55

    Aims: It is common in the context of evaluations that participants have not been selected on the basis of transparent participation criteria, and researchers and evaluators many times have to make do with observational data to estimate effects of job training programs and similar interventions. The techniques developed by researchers in such endeavours are useful not only to researchers narrowly focused on evaluations, but also to social and population science more generally, as observational data overwhelmingly are the norm, and the endogeneity challenges encountered in the estimation of causal effects with such data are not trivial. The aim of this article is to illustrate how register data can be used strategically to evaluate programs and interventions and to estimate causal effects of participation in these. Methods: We use propensity score matching on pretreatment-period variables to derive a synthetic control group, and we use this group as a comparison to estimate the employment-treatment effect of participation in a large job-training program. Results: We find the effect of treatment to be small and positive but transient. Conclusions: Our method reveals a strong regression to the mean effect, extremely easy to interpret as a treatment effect had a less advanced design been used (e.g. a within-subjects panel data analysis), and illustrates one of the unique advantages of using population register data for research purposes.

  • 2016. Magnus Bygren. Sociology of education 89 (2), 118-136

    To test the effect of ability grouping on grades and the attainment of higher education, this study examines a naturally occurring experimentan admission reform that dramatically increased ability sorting between schools in the municipality of Stockholm. Following six cohorts of students (N= 79,020) from the age of 16 to 26, I find a mean effect close to zero and small positive and negative differentiating effects on grades. With regard to the attainment of higher education, I find a mean effect close to zero, the achievement group gap was unaffected, the immigrant-native gap increased, and the class background gap decreased. These results are consistent with much previous research that has found small mean effects of ability grouping. They are inconsistent with previous research, however, in that I find ability grouping's effects on gaps are rather small and point in different directions.

Visa alla publikationer av Magnus Bygren vid Stockholms universitet

Senast uppdaterad: 27 juni 2018

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