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Lena Lotta Reuterskiöld, porträtt. Foto: Niklas Björling.

Lena Lotta Reuterskiöld

Universitetslektor

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Arbetar vid Psykologiska institutionen
Telefon 08-16 46 62
E-post lsm@psychology.su.se
Besöksadress Frescati hagväg 14
Rum 337
Postadress Psykologiska institutionen 106 91 Stockholm

Publikationer

I urval från Stockholms universitets publikationsdatabas
  • 2016. S. Shahnavaz (et al.). JDR Clinical & Translational Research 1 (3), 234-243

    Dental anxiety affects approximately 9% of children and is associated with poor oral health, pain, and psychosocial problems. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children with dental anxiety in specialist pediatric dentistry. The study used a parallel-group superiority randomized controlled trial design. The primary outcome measure was the behavioral avoidance test; assessors were blind to treatment allocation. Participants were 8 boys and 22 girls 7 to 18 y old (mean ± SD, 10 ± 3.1). Children fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for dental anxiety were randomized to CBT (n = 13) or treatment as usual (n = 17), such as various sedation methods. Psychologists provided 10 h of CBT based on a treatment manual. Treatments were conducted in a naturalistic real-world clinical setting. Assessments were conducted before the treatment, 3 mo after the start of treatment, and at 1-y follow-up. The analyses of the primary outcome measure by repeated-measures analysis of variance and independent t test showed that children receiving CBT made superior, statistically significant improvements at follow-up (16.8 ± 2.4) compared with treatment as usual (11.4 ± 3.1, P < 0.01). A large between-group effect size (Cohen’s d = 1.9) was found. Following treatment, 73% of those in the CBT group managed all stages of the dental procedures included in the behavioral avoidance test compared with 13% in the treatment-as-usual group. Furthermore, 91% in the CBT group compared with 25% in the treatment-as-usual group no longer met the diagnostic criteria for dental anxiety at the 1-y follow-up according to the secondary outcome measure. Measures of dental anxiety and self-efficacy showed larger improvements in the CBT group compared with controls. We conclude that CBT is an efficacious treatment for children and adolescents with dental anxiety and should be made accessible in pediatric dentistry (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01798355).

  • 2016. Alexander Miloff (et al.). EABCT 2016 Abstract Book, 753-753

    This is the first large randomized-controlled trial to evaluate whether commercially available VR hardware and software can be used for exposure therapy. The aim of this study is to compare gold-standard One Session Treatment (OST) for reduction of spider phobia symptoms and avoidance behaviour using in vivo spiders and a human therapist, to a newly developed single-session gamified Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) application with modern, consumer-available VR hardware, virtual spiders, and a virtual therapist. Subjects (N = 100) with spider phobia, diagnosed, and meeting inclusion criteria were recruited from the general population and randomized to 2 treatment arms. In 1-week intervals, pre-measurement, 3-hr treatment and post-measurement were completed with an in-vivo behavioral approach test (BAT) serving as the primary outcome measure for both groups. This study was powered to detect a non-inferiority margin of a 2-point between-group difference on the BAT, with a standard deviation of 4 (at 80% power). 98 patients commenced treatment and 97 patients completed post-measurement. Per protocol analysis indicated VR was not non-inferior to OST. Repeated-measures ANOVA identified a significant main effect of time (p < .001) and time x group effect (p < .05). Both OST and VR participants experienced large BAT within-group effect sizes (d = 2.28 and d = 1.45, respectively). OST is the superior treatment option for spider phobia. VRET is an effective alternative if OST cannot be provided, as pure self-help, as the initial intervention in a stepped-care model, or as a possible post-OST booster. Future studies will benefit from evaluating effectiveness of VRET when conducted at home.

  • 2016. Alexander Miloff (et al.).

    Introduction: Traditional one-session therapy (OST) in which a patient is gradually exposed to feared stimuli for up to 3hrs in a one-session format has been found effective for the treatment of specific phobias. However, many suffering from specific phobia are reluctant to seek help and access to care is lacking. Virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy using a smartphone may improve upon existing techniques by facilitating access, lowering cost, and increasing acceptability and effectiveness. The aim of this study was to compare traditional OST with in-vivo spiders and a human therapist to a newly developed single-session gamified VR exposure therapy application with modern VR headsets, virtual spiders and a virtual therapist.

    Method: Participants with specific phobia to spiders (N=100) were recruited from the general public, screened and randomized to either OST (N=50) or VR exposure therapy (N=50) using the smartphone-based Samsung Gear VR system. A behavioral approach test using in-vivo spiders served as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures included spider phobia questionnaires, and self-reported anxiety, depression and quality of life. Outcomes were assessed 1-week before and after treatment and at follow-up (12 and 52 weeks).

    Results: At the time of submitting this abstract all participants have been included and randomized and a large portion has also received the allotted treatment. However, since the study uses strict blinding, results will not be available until March 2016.

    Discussion: VR exposure therapy has previously been evaluated as a treatment for specific phobias but there has been a lack of high-quality randomized controlled trials. A new generation of modern VR devices are being released which advance upon existing technology and have the potential to improve clinical availability and treatment effectiveness.

    Conclusion: Preliminary clinical observations suggest that single-session gamified virtual reality exposure therapy using a smartphone is effective for the treatment of spider phobia.

  • 2016. Alexander Miloff (et al.). Trials 17

    Background: Traditional one-session exposure therapy (OST) in which a patient is gradually exposed to feared stimuli for up to 3 h in a one-session format has been found effective for the treatment of specific phobias. However, many individuals with specific phobia are reluctant to seek help, and access to care is lacking due to logistic challenges of accessing, collecting, storing, and/or maintaining stimuli. Virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy may improve upon existing techniques by facilitating access, decreasing cost, and increasing acceptability and effectiveness. The aim of this study is to compare traditional OST with in vivo spiders and a human therapist with a newly developed single-session gamified VR exposure therapy application with modern VR hardware, virtual spiders, and a virtual therapist. Methods/design: Participants with specific phobia to spiders (N = 100) will be recruited from the general public, screened, and randomized to either VR exposure therapy (n = 50) or traditional OST (n = 50). A behavioral approach test using in vivo spiders will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures will include spider phobia questionnaires and self-reported anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Outcomes will be assessed using a non-inferiority design at baseline and at 1, 12, and 52 weeks after treatment. Discussion: VR exposure therapy has previously been evaluated as a treatment for specific phobias, but there has been a lack of high-quality randomized controlled trials. A new generation of modern, consumer-ready VR devices is being released that are advancing existing technology and have the potential to improve clinical availability and treatment effectiveness. The VR medium is also particularly suitable for taking advantage of recent phobia treatment research emphasizing engagement and new learning, as opposed to physiological habituation. This study compares a market-ready, gamified VR spider phobia exposure application, delivered using consumer VR hardware, with the current gold standard treatment. Implications are discussed.

  • 2015. Lars-Göran Öst, Rio Cederlund, Lena Reuterskiöld. Behaviour Research and Therapy 67, 19-29

    Social phobia is one of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, and it runs a fairly chronic course if left untreated. The goals of the present study were to evaluate if a parent education course would improve the outcome for children with a primary diagnosis of social phobia and if comorbidity at the start of treatment would impair the outcome of the social phobia. A total of 55 children, 8-14 years old, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1) Child is treated, 2) Child is treated and parent participates in the course, or 3) A wait-list for 12 weeks. The treatment consisted of individual exposure and group social skills training based on the Beidel, Turner, and Morris (2000) SET-C. Children and parents were assessed pre-, post-, and at one year follow-up with independent assessor ratings and self-report measures. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the two active treatments and both were better than the wait-list. The treatment effects were maintained or furthered at the follow-up. Comorbidity did not lead to worse outcome of social phobia. Comorbid disorders improved significantly from pre-to post-treatment and from post-to follow-up assessment without being targeted in therapy.

  • 2015. Alexander Miloff (et al.). SWEsrii 2015, 17-17

    VIMSE is a new spider phobia exposure application developed for use on next generation VR headsets. Developed by Mimerse AB for the Stockholm University Department of Psychology the application advances exposure technology along a number of important fronts. VIMSE uses gamification to increase user engagement and learning, is fully automated with a virtual therapist to allow at home-self care, contains multiple open-ended environments and lighting to ensure exposure in multiple contexts, as well as a range of spiders, spider behaviors and stimuli intensity levels to ensure gradually increasing exposure levels. Collaboration with a for-profit corporation ensures the application is market-ready and scalable rather than restricted to a research environment. VIMSE is currently completing clinical trials comparing it to gold-standard one session therapy phobia treatment in a group of 100 spider phobics.

Visa alla publikationer av Lena Lotta Reuterskiöld vid Stockholms universitet

Senast uppdaterad: 9 oktober 2018

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