Profiles

Sara Kjellsson

Sara Kjellsson

Forskare

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Arbetar vid Institutet för social forskning
Telefon 08-674 70 60
E-post sara.kjellsson@sofi.su.se
Besöksadress Universitetsvägen 10 F
Rum F 950
Postadress Institutet för social forskning 106 91 Stockholm

Om mig

I am a PhD in sociology and work with the Level-of-Living (LNU) research group at the Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). My research interests concerns health inequality and the focus of my doctoral dissertation concerned how social class, gender and labour market conditions are related to health outcomes.

Publikationer

I urval från Stockholms universitets publikationsdatabas
  • 2013. Sara Kjellsson. Social Science and Medicine 81, 26-33

    Previous research has shown a social gradient in health with better health for people in more advantaged positions in society. This research has mainly been on the relationship between current position and health, or social position in childhood and health, but less is known about the potential accumulative impact of positions held in adulthood. In this paper I use the economic activity histories from the Swedish Level of Living survey to examine the relationship between accumulated occupational class positions and health. Step-wise linear probability models are used to investigate how to best capture the potential association between class experience and self-rated health (SRH), and whether the effect of current class is modified when measures of accumulated class are included. I then further test the potentially lasting association between previous exposure to the health risk of working class by analysing only individuals currently in higher or intermediate level service class; the classes under least exposure. I find a positive association between accumulated experiences of working class and less than good SRH. Furthermore, even for employees currently in non-manual positions the risk for less than good SRH increases with each added year of previous experience within working class. This suggests that the social gradient can be both accumulative and lasting, and that more information on the mechanisms of health disparities can be found by taking detailed information on peoples' pasts into account. Although gender differences in health are not a focus in this paper, results also indicate that the influence of class experiences on health might differ between men and women.

  • 2014. Sara Kjellsson, Charlotta Magnusson, Michael Tåhlin. Jämställt arbete?, 151-193
Visa alla publikationer av Sara Kjellsson vid Stockholms universitet

Senast uppdaterad: 6 september 2018

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