Profiles

Therese von Braun. Foto: Eva Dalin

Therese von Braun

Gästforskare

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Arbetar vid Institutionen för socialt arbete
E-post therese.vonbraun@socarb.su.se
Besöksadress Sveavägen 160, Sveaplan
Rum 618
Postadress Institutionen för socialt arbete 106 91 Stockholm

Publikationer

I urval från Stockholms universitets publikationsdatabas
  • 2018. Therese von Braun (et al.).

    The aim of the thesis was to increase knowledge on how to understand the therapeutic process highlighting the importance of the therapeutic relationship as described by therapists and clients in substance use-related dependency treatment. The research questions were related to how the therapeutic process can contribute to a positive outcome considering the therapists’, the clients’ and close co-dependent relatives’ perspectives.

     

    The thesis followed a qualitative and narrative research design and consists of six studies (I-VI). Study I contributed a description of a multidimensional interactional model for the analysis of substance use-related dependency. The study revealed how a multidimensional interactional model can provide holistic and detailed knowledge about the complex processes involved in the use or misuse of alcohol and drugs. The interactional model was illustrated by a narrative analysis of qualitative empirical data. This model seemed to support a person-by-situation interactional analysis of substance use-related dependency. Study II revealed the possibilities and limitations of using a self-theoretical perspective in the analysis of the use or misuse of alcohol and drugs. The self-theoretical perspective was related to empirical case illustrations based on qualitative or narrative data. The implications of studies I and II were that a self-theoretical perspective can be integrated within a multidimensional model and can be a fruitful theoretical framework for the analysis of treatment processes of dependency. Study III presented conceptual contributions for understanding treatment of substance use-related dependency, focusing on the importance of the therapeutic process and the therapeutic relationship and the use of narrative methods. Study IV presented a structural perspective on clients’ narrative descriptions of different phases of the use or misuse of alcohol and drugs including phases of treatment. Study V contributed an in-depth analysis of three therapists’ narratives of therapeutic relationships in the treatment of drug-dependent clients. The analysis pointed out the multidimensional aspects of the treatment and focused on three phases of therapy; starting the therapeutic process and building a therapeutic relationship, the ongoing therapeutic process, and the closing phase of therapy. The study also presented an in-depth analysis of two narrative case histories on dependency treatment. Study VI focused on a qualitative in-depth analysis based on narrative data from a group of 10 clients that had undergone treatment for alcohol and drug use or misuse. The study also included qualitative and narrative data from four co-dependent clients and six therapists about their views on the treatment process and the therapeutic relationship. The results of the study described how to understand the experiential world of the clients and their cognitive, emotional and behavioral changes associated with the treatment process.

     

    The thesis’ contributions relate to an outline of a self-theoretical perspective integrated within a multidimensional interactional model for the analysis of the therapeutic process and the therapeutic relationship in substance use-related dependency treatment. The theoretical analysis sheds new light on the complexity of the treatment process and the clients’ struggle with their personal identity and sense of self, especially their drug self.

  • Therese von Braun, Sam Larsson.

    This study focuses on therapists’ and clients’ qualitative and narrative descriptions of how they experience the therapeutic process, including the therapeutic relationship, in substance use-related dependency treatment. The aim of the study was to increase knowledge on how to understand the treatment process, and highlighting the importance of the therapeutic relationship applied to substance use-related dependency treatment. The empirical study focuses on an in-depth analysis based mainly on qualitative and narrative data considering 10 clients, six therapists and four co-dependent relatives from a dependency treatment unit localized in a mid-sized town in Sweden. Clients who participated in the study had undergone treatment for alcohol and drug use/misuse or co-dependency problems that resulted in positive outcomes. The therapists included in the study were working at the same treatment center. The empirical results give a detailed picture of the experiential world of the clients and their cognitive, emotional and behavioral changes associated with the treatment process and how they viewed the meaning of the therapeutic relationship in the treatment process. The results also include the therapists’ point of view of the treatment process, including their opinion of the meaning of the therapeutic relationship and how they describe the treatment process related to “what works” in therapy. The results describe the complexity and importance of the therapeutic relationship in a substance use-related dependency treatment process. The results reveal that the treatment process follows a dynamic pattern in which changes of the clients’ sense of self, cognitions, emotions, self-knowledge and self-empowerment play a central role. The interviews described some divergent perspectives between therapists and clients concerning the interpretation of the therapeutic process. However, there were also similarities between the clients’ and the therapists’ narrative accounts regarding the importance of clients’ mentalization and self-realization processes, including the importance of finding their “true self” and coping with their inner struggle between “the drug self” and “the sober self “ and reaching a more sustainable self-system.

  • 2013. Sam Larsson, Therese von Braun, John Lilja. Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1306-1316

    This chapter examines the possibilities and limitations of using a narrative method as a framework within a multidimensional model for exploring and analyzing the use and misuse of alcohol and drugs. It is posited that a multidimensional model, based on narrative reasoning, can give a more detailed and specific understanding of substance users, who represent a heterogeneous population of people, and of substance use-related dependency problems. Such a model describes and analyses the drug-use related problems in a manner that provides holistic and important information and knowledge about the person by contextual and situation interaction processes which are involved in the use/misuse of alcohol and drugs. Tentative conclusions and unresolved critical issues are considered.

  • 2013. Sam Larsson (et al.). Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1317-1335

    This article discusses different self-theoretical perspectives of the self that are of importance in the analysis of the use and misuse of alcohol and psychoactive drugs. The self-theories considered here include cognitive, psychodynamic, transpersonal, and social constructivist perspectives. A multidimensional perspective focusing on the connection between identity structures and analyzing the use/misuse of alcohol and psychoactive drugs is presented. The article argues for a self-theoretical analysis based on narrative data in order to reach an in-depth understanding of the use and misuse of alcohol and psychoactive drugs.

  • 2013. John Lilja (et al.). Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1438-1446

    Preliminary and tentative conclusions concerning theoretical and methodological issues about narrative methods and their use as a research strategy for investigating and understanding the use and misuse of alcohol and drugs are presented. The treatment methods that are influenced by narrative strategies as well as this tool's limitations are noted. The article focuses particularly on approaches based on, and influenced by, psychology, sociology and social work when conducting narrative research.

  • 2013. Sam Larsson (et al.). Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1294-1305

    This chapter provides a short introduction to, and an overview for, using narrative analysis in the understanding of the use and misuse of alcohol and drugs. Important theoretical and methodological dimensions are discussed. Some tentative conclusions, limitations, and unresolved critical issues concerning the use of narrative research methods in the analysis of substance use-related dependency problems are also presented.

  • 2013. Sam Larsson (et al.). Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1286-1293
  • 2013. Therese von Braun, Sam Larsson, Yvonne Sjöblom. Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1404-1415

    The article focuses on narratives of clients' experiences of using/misusing alcohol and drugs and includes comments on their therapeutic process during treatment for dependency on psychoactive drugs. It discusses the role of narratives that focus on clients' experiences of understanding the use/ misuse of psychoactive drugs, emphasizing the importance of the narratives. Narrative therapy for substance-use-related dependency is discussed. Insight into the treatment processes of dependency, based on narrative case illustrations, is also provided.

  • 2013. Thérèse von Braun, Sam Larsson, Yvonne Sjöblom. Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1386-1403

    This article considers different perspectives on the treatment of substance use-related dependency, focusing on the importance of a therapeutic relationship, working alliance, counseling, and the use of narrative methods. The article also discusses some unresolved critical issues concerning the possibilities and limitations of acquiring necessary knowledge about substance use-related dependency when using narrative research methods. The main conclusion is that the therapeutic relationship between the therapist and the client is of crucial importance for a positive outcome of treatment and that narrative methods provide a detailed empirical database for analyses of substance use-related dependency.

  • 2013. Therese von Braun. Substance Use & Misuse 48 (13), 1416-1433

    The article explores and analyzes therapists' narratives, using selected stories, and their strategies for achieving a positive therapeutic relationship and a therapeutic alliance with their patients as a critical dimension to enable effective treatment with patients manifesting dependency problems. Although the therapists are applying different treatment and dependency theories and methods they all emphasize the importance of the therapeutic alliance in order to be successful in the treatment process.

  • 2012. Sam Larsson, Therese von Braun, John Lilja. Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift 19 (3-4), 151-169
  • 2012. Sam Larsson, John Lilja, Thérèse von Braun. Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift (3-4), 146-150
Visa alla publikationer av Therese von Braun vid Stockholms universitet

Senast uppdaterad: 15 oktober 2018

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