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Kari Fraurud

About me

I have studied and/or worked as a teacher, supervisor and researcher at several different departments in Uppsala, Istanbul, Hamburg and Stockholm including Rinkeby. My last engagement was at the Centre for Research on Bilingualism, nowadays integrated into Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Stockholm University. Now I am retired.

Research

My research has been wide ranging, from computer linguistic oriented corpus linguistics to sociolinguistic and folk linguistic oriented bilingual research. Some main areas:

  • Cognitive and crosslinguisitc perspectives on reference and definiteness
  • The transnational minority language Romani in Sweden
  • Migration related linguistic variation and young people's sociolinguistic awareness and language attitudes

Publications

A selection from Stockholm University publication database

  • What's the target? A folk linguistic study of young Stockholmers' constructions of linguistic norm and variation

    2016. Ellen Bijvoet, Kari Fraurud. Language Awareness 25 (1-2), 17-39

    Article

    To account for the full range of language use in contemporary multilingual urban contexts, the notion of target language (TL) needs to be reconsidered. In studies of second language acquisition and language variation, taking TL for granted implies that people agree on what constitutes 'good' language, or the standard norm. The TL of language learners and users is, however, more heterogeneous than is often assumed. To gain insight into what people are actually targeting in their language development and use, we need to study their perceptions of ambient sociolinguistic variation. In this folk linguistic listener study involving 343 upper secondary school students, a range of data types were analysed: attitude scales, variety labelling, and assessments of speakers' social and linguistic backgrounds. This article highlights some results pointing to a considerable divergence in the listeners' perceptions, in particular with regard to speech representing what is here characterised as migration-related social dialects. Several listeners labelled these samples as 'good' Swedish, possibly suggesting that they do not simply aim at or even relate to a TL identical with the dominating monolingual norm, but may instead have a less narrow view of the kind of Swedish they consider appropriate for use in more formal situations.

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  • Studying high-level (L1-L2) development and use among young people in multilingual Stockholm

    2012. Ellen Bijvoet, Kari Fraurud. Studies in Second Language Acquisition 34 (2), 291-319

    Article

    This article makes a case for studying the perceptions that young people have of the ways of speaking of both themselves and others on the supposition that constructions of ambient sociolinguistic variation have an impact on the language development and use of individual language users. Such a study is particularly relevant in multilingual contexts in which differences with regard to social as well as ethnic and linguistic background may generate significantly different perceptions. In a speaker evaluation study, Swedish speech stimuli from 12 young Stockholmers were evaluated by 343 listeners from different backgrounds. The results show that young people may divide and relate to the linguistic space of Stockholm in very different ways and that they vary in their degree of accuracy regarding linguistic self-perception.

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  • The native–non-native speaker distinction and the diversity of linguistic profiles of young people in multilingual urban contexts in Sweden

    2011. Kari Fraurud, Sally Boyd. Young urban Swedish, 67-87

    Chapter

    The distinction between native and non-native speakers (NS/NNS) has played a central role in all areas of linguistics, but is also perennially questioned. This paper aims to contribute to the discussion of the distinction by exploring a large body of empirical data collected in the SUF project. Data about linguistic background and practices of 222 informants were analyzed by means of linguistic profiling. The resulting profiles display great diversity among informants regarding nativeness criteria, which can also be expected to be found in other similar contexts. This implies that the application of a binary NS/NNS distinction in such contexts will either result in a categorization of informants into two heterogeneous groups, or, if only clear cases are included, result in the exclusion of a considerable number of language users from the investigation. These observations have implications for the study of language variation and change in multilingual contexts more generally.

    Read more about The native–non-native speaker distinction and the diversity of linguistic profiles of young people in multilingual urban contexts in Sweden
  • Romani

    2010. Kari Fraurud. Sveriges Nationalatlas, band 22: Språken i Sverige, 136-139

    Chapter
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  • The native–non-native speaker distinction and the diversity of linguistic profiles of young people in Swedish multilingual urban contexts

    2006. Kari Fraurud, Sally Boyd. Language Variation – European Perspectives. , 53-69

    Chapter

    The notion of native speaker (NS) has played a central role in all areas of linguistics, but it is also perennially questioned. This paper aims to contribute to the discussion of the usefulness of the binary distinction between native and non-native speakers (NNS) by exploring a relatively large body of empirical data collected in a study of language and language use among young people in contemporary multilingual urban settings in Sweden.

    Data about linguistic background and practices from 222 informants were analyzed by means of so called linguistic profiling – here involving a number of variables reflecting various nativeness criteria. The resulting complex and varied linguistic profiles display the great diversity among informants. This diversity is presumably not unique to these 222 young people, but can also be expected to be found in other similar contexts. The application of a binary NS/NNS distinction in such contexts will either – if a single criterion is used – result in a categorization of informants into two widely heterogeneous groups, or – if multiple criteria are combined and only clear cases considered – result in the exclusion of a considerable number of language users from the object of study. These observations should also have implications for the study of language variation and change in multilingual contexts more generally.

    Read more about The native–non-native speaker distinction and the diversity of linguistic profiles of young people in Swedish multilingual urban contexts

Show all publications by Kari Fraurud at Stockholm University