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Abhay Prakash

About me

Education:

1) B.Tech Civil Engineering (2010-2014) - KIIT, School of Civil Engineering, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

2) M.Sc. Geoscience and Remote Sensing (2015-2017) - Delft University of Technology, Faculty Of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft, The Netherlands.

3) Ph.D. student (May 2018 - Present) - Stockholm University, Department of Physical Geography, Glaciology and Geomorphology (GG) Research Unit.

Teaching

I have been a part of the teaching unit in the following courses:

As a Teaching Assistant (TA) in:

  • GE7092 Glaciology (M.Sc. Course)
  • GE5003 Glaciers and High Mountain Environments (Summer Course)
  • GG4203 Quantitative Methods in Geoscience (B.Sc. Course) - VT 2019, VT 2020


As a Teacher in:

  • GG4203 Quantitative Methods in Geoscience (B.Sc. Course) - VT 2021, VT 2022.
  • Taught Part - II of the course which covers topics such as Differential Calculus, Integral Calculus and Matrix Algebra.
  • Key responsibilities included preparing (online) lectures and quizzes, implementing a flipped classroom to increase student engagement, and lastly, performance evaluation / grading. 
     

Research

I am working under the supervision of Dr. Nina Kirchner to model the ice shelf-ocean interactions at Petermann Glacier Ice Shelf (PGIS), North-West Greenland. We are collaborating with scientists from Akvaplan-niva (Dr. Qin Zhou), Tromsø, Norwegian Polar Institute (Dr. Tore Hattermann), Tromsø and UiT (Dr. Rune Graversen), Tromsø to build a nested high-resolution (200 m) unstructured grid 3-D ocean-sea ice-ice shelf setup that uses the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). An ice shelf module has been implemented into the FVCOM version used in our Petermann Fjord-PGIS setup which allows us to prescribe realistic PGIS geometry. Further, to represent the effect of sea ice cover at high latitudes in modulating the atmospheric forcing on the ocean surface, we have implemented a new sea ice module (Ice Nudge) into the version of FVCOM used in this setup that allows us to prescribe sea ice conditions as external surface-forcing parameters. With our setup, we also provide a more realistic representation of the sub ice shelf topography at Petermann, and boundary conditions for ocean, atmosphere and sea ice derived from a suite of high-resolution regional models that can be used to initialize and run our model with realistic geophysical settings. A detail description of our setup can be found here.

My research interests include:

  • Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
  • Physical Oceanography
  • Glaciology
  • Numerical Modeling
  • Satellite Geodesy
  • Physical Geodesy
  • Land Surveying
  • Civil Engineering
  • Mathematical Geodesy
  • Estimation Theory
  • Signal Analysis
  • Radar Remote Sensing
  • Parallel Computing

You can also find me on ResearchGate.

Research projects

Publications

A selection from Stockholm University publication database

  • A nested high-resolution unstructured grid 3-D ocean-sea ice-ice shelf setup for numerical investigations of the Petermann ice shelf and fjord

    2022. Abhay Prakash (et al.). MethodsX 9

    Article

    Three-dimensional numerical simulation of circulation in fjords hosting marine-terminating ice shelves is challenging because of the complexity of processes involved in such environments. This often requires a comprehensive model setup. The following elements are needed: bathymetry (usually unknown beneath the glacier tongue), ice shelf draft (impacting water column thickness), oceanographic state (including tidal elevation, salinity, temperature and velocity of the water masses), sea ice and atmospheric forcing. Moreover, a high spatial resolution is needed, at least locally, which may be augmented with a coarser and computationally cheaper (nested) model that provides sufficiently realistic conditions at the boundaries. Here, we describe procedures to systematically create such a setup that uses the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for the Petermann Fjord, Northwest Greenland. The first simulations are validated against temperature and salinity observations from the Petermann Fjord in September 2019. We provide

    •Complete bathymetry, ice-draft and water column thickness datasets of the Petermann Fjord, with an improved representation of the topography underneath the glacier tongue.

    •Boundary conditions for ocean, atmosphere and sea ice derived from a suite of high-resolution regional models that can be used to initialize and run the regional ocean model with realistic geophysical settings.

    Read more about A nested high-resolution unstructured grid 3-D ocean-sea ice-ice shelf setup for numerical investigations of the Petermann ice shelf and fjord
  • Calving at Ryder Glacier, Northern Greenland

    2021. Felicity A. Holmes (et al.). Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface 126 (4)

    Article

    Recent evidence has shown increasing mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet, with a general trend of accelerated mass losses extending northwards. However, different glaciers have been shown to respond differently to similar external forcings, constituting a problem for extrapolating and upscaling data. Specifically, whilst some outlet glaciers have accelerated, thinned, and retreated in response to atmospheric and oceanic warming, the behavior of other marine terminating glaciers appears to be less sensitive to climate forcing. Ryder glacier, for which only a few studies have been conducted, is located in North Greenland and terminates with a floating ice tongue in Sherard Osborn Fjord. The persistence or disintegration of floating ice tongues has impacts on glacier dynamics and stability, with ramifications beyond, including sea level rise. This study focuses on understanding the controls on calving and frontal ablation of the Ryder glacier through the use of time-lapse imagery and satellite data. The results suggest that Ryder glacier has behaved independently of climate forcing during recent decades, with fjord geometry exerting a first order control on its calving.

    Read more about Calving at Ryder Glacier, Northern Greenland
  • Ryder Glacier in northwest Greenland is shielded from warm Atlantic water by a bathymetric sill

    2020. Martin Jakobsson (et al.). Communications earth & environment 1 (1)

    Article

    The processes controlling advance and retreat of outlet glaciers in fjords draining the Greenland Ice Sheet remain poorly known, undermining assessments of their dynamics and associated sea-level rise in a warming climate. Mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased six-fold over the last four decades, with discharge and melt from outlet glaciers comprising key components of this loss. Here we acquired oceanographic data and multibeam bathymetry in the previously uncharted Sherard Osborn Fjord in northwest Greenland where Ryder Glacier drains into the Arctic Ocean. Our data show that warmer subsurface water of Atlantic origin enters the fjord, but Ryder Glacier's floating tongue at its present location is partly protected from the inflow by a bathymetric sill located in the innermost fjord. This reduces under-ice melting of the glacier, providing insight into Ryder Glacier's dynamics and its vulnerability to inflow of Atlantic warmer water. A bathymetric sill in Sherard Osborn Fjord, northwest Greenland shields Ryder Glacier from melting by warm Atlantic water found at the bottom of the fjord, according to high-resolution bathymetric mapping and oceanographic data.

    Read more about Ryder Glacier in northwest Greenland is shielded from warm Atlantic water by a bathymetric sill

Show all publications by Abhay Prakash at Stockholm University