Profiles

Anna Nyberg

Anna Nyberg

Forskare

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Email anna.nyberg@su.se
Visiting address Frescati Hagväg 16 A
Room 234
Postal address Stressforskningsinstitutet 106 91 Stockholm

About me

Anna Nyberg is a chartered psychologist and researcher in the Epidemiology unit at the Stress Research Institute. One of her main research areas concerns how leadership in the workplace is associated with stress, health, and health-related consequences among employees. In 2014-2017 she led a project financed by FORTE investigating the work situation, health and career development of female managers. During 2017-2019, she is running two projects investigating the causes of increased mental ill-health and sickness absence among employees working in female-dominated workplaces and occupations. The project will focus on organisational and psychosocial work factors as well as factors in unpaid domestic work. In her current research Anna primarily uses data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH).

In addition to her research work, Anna’s background is in occupational health psychology and human resources consultancy.

Education:

2003 Master in Psychology, Stockholm University

2009 PhD in Medical Science, Karolinska Institutet

Publications

A selection from Stockholm University publication database
  • 2018. Sara Cerdas (et al.). Book of proceedings 13th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology, 34-35

    Background: In Sweden, the development of mental ill-health and sickness absence has been poorer in female-dominated industries compared to others. One possible explanation is the different developments of psychosocial working conditions across industries. Men and women appear to react similarly to the same psychosocial exposures at work, but differences in exposure patterns may prevail. There is to date a lack of studies on the extent to which psychosocial work exposures are associated with the gender segregation on the Swedish labour market at the industry level. This study aims to investigate how organisational and psychosocial work factors have developed over time across industries with different gender composition in Sweden from 2003 to 2013, and to what extent these factors differ between industries.

    Methods: The present study is based on repeated cross-sectional data from the Swedish Work Environment Survey (SWES). SWES is conducted biennially by Statistics Sweden (SCB) and includes Swedish workers aged 16-64 years. Six waves from 2003 to 2013, comprising a study sample of 45,631 subjects, were analysed, Industries were categorised according to gender composition and divided into seven categories: 1) Goods and energy production; 2) Machine handling; 3) Manual services; 4) Public administration; 5) Knowledge intensive services; 6) Education; 7) Health and social care. Proportions of men and women in each industry who were exposed to adverse or positive organisational and psychosocial work factors were calculated for each of the six waves. Logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age, educational level and year of response to SWES were performed on the full sample (all six waves), in order to estimate the odds of being exposed to organisational and psychosocial work factors in each industry using the knowledge intensive service industry as the reference category.

    Results: Preliminary results show that in female dominated industries (Education and Health and social care), many organisational and psychosocial work factors developed poorly over the study period. Higher odds of exposure to adverse or positive organisational and psychosocial work factors were found for several industries when using the industry of Knowledge intensive services as the reference category.

    Conclusion: This study is one of the first of its kind analysing the development of organisational and psychosocial work factors, as well as differences in these factors between industries with different gender compositions in Sweden.

  • 2018. Anna Nyberg (et al.). Book of Proceedings 13th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology, 308-309

    Background: To increase possibilities for women and men to remain in leadership positions a better understanding of turnover processes among female and male managers appears important. Although the interface between work and personal life has been recognised as a key issue for managers, it has seldom been empirically investigated in relation to turnover. In the present study we used a longitudinal multi-group design to examine associations between work- personal life interference, managerial turnover and depressive symptoms, and their differences with respect to gender. We hypothesised that 1) work-personal life interference predict managerial turnover, 2) depressive symptoms mediate the association, which 3) differ by gender. 

    Methods: Data were drawn from four waves (2010, 2012, 2014 and 2016) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), a cohort of the Swedish working population. Participants who in any wave reported to have a managerial or other leading position were included (n=717 men and 741 women). Mediation models within a multilevel SEM framework, in which repeated measures were nested within individuals, were fitted. First, bivariate autoregressive and cross-lagged paths between the variables (t and t-1) were fitted in gender stratified models. Secondly, a full longitudinal gender stratified mediation model was built to estimate if the association between work-personal life interference (t-2) and turnover (t) was mediated through depressive symptoms (t-1). Gender differences in cross-lagged paths were estimated with multiple-group analysis. All analyses were adjusted for age, education, labour market sector, civil status and children living at home, and conducted in MPLUS 7.

    Results: In accordance with our first hypothesis, significant prospective paths between work- personal life interference and turnover were found among both male and female managers. In line with our second hypothesis, there were furthermore significant prospective associations between work-personal life interference and depressive symptoms as well as between depressive symptoms and turnover in both genders. However, no significant intermediate effect of depressive symptoms in the longitudinal association between work-personal life interference and turnover was found in any gender, and therefore our second hypothesis was not supported. We found gender differences in several of the estimated associations, lending partial support for our third hypothesis.

    Conclusions: Establishing organisational prerequisites for good work-personal life balance among managers may be a means to retain male and female managerial talent.

  • 2018. Anna Nyberg (et al.). BMC Public Health 18

    Background: In the present study we used a longitudinal design to examine if work-personal life interference predicted managerial turnover, if depressive symptoms mediated the association, and if the relationships differed by gender.

    Methods: Data were drawn from four waves (2010, 2012, 2014 and 2016) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), a cohort of the Swedish working population. Participants who in any wave reported to have a managerial or other leading position were included (n = 717 men and 741 women). Autoregressive longitudinal mediation models within a multilevel structural equation modelling (MSEM) framework, in which repeated measures (level 1) were nested within individuals (level 2), were fitted to data. First, bivariate autoregressive and cross-lagged paths between the variables were fitted in gender stratified models. Secondly, a full gender stratified mediation model was built to estimate if the association between work-personal life interference and turnover was mediated through depressive symptoms. Gender differences in cross-lagged paths were estimated with multiple-group analysis. All analyses were adjusted for age, education, labour market sector, civil status and children living at home, and conducted in MPLUS 7.

    Results: In both genders there were significant paths between work-personal life interference and turnover. Depressive symptoms were, however, not found to mediate in the relationship between work-personal life interference and turnover. The models differed significantly between genders.

    Conclusions: Establishing organisational prerequisites for good work-personal life balance among managers may be a means to retain both male and female managerial talent.

Show all publications by Anna Nyberg at Stockholm University

Last updated: January 17, 2019

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