Profiles

Jonas Landberg

Jonas Landberg

Researcher

Visa sidan på svenska
Works at Department of Public Health Sciences
Email jonas.landberg@su.se
Visiting address Sveavägen 160, Sveaplan
Room 332
Postal address Institutionen för folkhälsovetenskap 106 91 Stockholm

Publications

A selection from Stockholm University publication database
  • 2012. Jonas Landberg. Alcoholism 36 (1), 113-118

    Background: Previous research has suggested a positive risk-relationship between volume of consumption and adverse behavioural and social consequences of drinking. However, because the risk-relationship may be modified by factors such as pattern of drinking, attributes of social drinking contexts and drunken comportment, the shape of the risk-function appear to be contingent upon the larger cultural context of drinking. Methods: In this paper I use graphical risk-curve analyses and model estimations to assess how the risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems is associated with self-reported volume of alcohol consumption in the three Baltic countries; Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania  as well as Sweden and Italy. The rationale behind the choice of countries was to obtain a basis for comparing the risk curves for the Baltic countries with the risk-curves for two countries representing distinct types of the western European drinking cultures. The analyses utilised data from two general population surveys (including Sweden plus Italy and the Baltic countries, respectively) with approximately 1000 respondents from each country. Results: The slopes of the risk-curves for the Baltic countries were generally parallel to those of for Sweden, but significantly steeper than for Italy. This result suggests that (i) the risk for alcohol-related problems in the Baltic countries increases with volume of consumption in a way that is similar to northern Europe, and (ii) that increasing volume of consumption is associated with a considerably higher risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems in the Baltic countries (and Sweden) than in Italy. The result also suggests that increasing volume of consumption is associated with the risk of experiencing a larger number of different problems in the Baltic countries and Sweden than in Italy. Conclusions: The results were in line with the hypothesis of a European north to south gradient in the strength of the risk-relationship, but also add that the Baltic countries may be placed alongside the Nordic countries in this context. Since only volume of consumption is considered, the results cannot be used to specify which factors and mechanisms that actually modify the shape of the risk-function in each culture.

  • 2011. Jonas Landberg, Thor Norström. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 72 (5), 723-730

    Objective: The object of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the aggregate relationship between alcohol and homicide in Russia and in the United States. The comparison was based on the magnitude of the alcohol effect, the alcohol attributable fraction (AAF), and the degree to which total consumption could account for trends in homicide. Method: We analyzed total and sex-specific homicide rates for the age groups 15-64 years, 15-34 years, and 35-64 years. The study period was 1959-1998 for Russia and 1950-2002 for the United States. For the United States, alcohol consumption was gauged by sales of alcohol; for Russia, estimated unrecorded consumption was included as well. The data were analyzed through autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) modeling. Results: The results show that, for Russia as well as for the United States, a 1-L increase in consumption was associated with an increase in homicides of about 10%, although the absolute effect was markedly larger in Russia because of differences in homicide rates. The AAF estimates suggested that 73% and 57% of the homicides would be attributable to alcohol in Russia and in the United States, respectively. Most of the temporal variation in the Russian homicide rate could be accounted for by the trend in drinking, whereas the U.S. trend in total alcohol consumption had a more limited ability to predict the trend in homicides. Conclusions: We conclude that the role of alcohol in homicide seems to be larger in Russia than in the United States.

  • 2010. Jonas Landberg (et al.).

    This thesis investigates the association between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm in Eastern Europe. The main aim was to estimate to what extent changes in per capita alcohol consumption have an impact on different forms of alcohol-related mortality, and to put the results in an international comparative perspective. The thesis includes four papers; the first two papers use aggregate time-series analysis to assess how changes in per capita consumption affect rates in suicide mortality and fatal non-intentional injuries in several Eastern European countries, respectively. The third paper applies the same methodological approach to analyse the population-level relationship between alcohol and homicide in Russia and the U.S.. The fourth paper employs survey data to assess how the risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems in relation to volume of consumption in the Baltic countries compares to Sweden and Italy. The results of the first three papers suggests: (i) that changes in per capita consumption are significantly related to changes in mortality rates of suicide, non-intentional injuries and homicide in the countries under study; (ii) that the relationship is stronger for men than for women, and (iii) that the relationship tends to be stronger in the countries with more detrimental drinking patterns, e.g. Russia. The results of the fourth paper suggest that the risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems in relation to level of drinking in the Baltic countries is similar to the corresponding risk in Sweden, but considerably stronger than in Italy. In conclusion, the findings support the significance of a public health approach to alcohol-related problems in Eastern Europe, i.e., policy measures directed towards total alcohol consumption. In addition, strategies aimed at reducing the occurrence of binge drinking seem to have great potential for reducing alcohol-related harm and mortality in Eastern European countries.

  • 2010. Jonas Landberg. European Addiction Research 16 (1), 43-52

    Aims: To estimate to what extent injury mortality rates in 6 Eastern European countries are affected by changes in population drinking during the post-war period. Data and Methods: The analysis included injury mortality rates and per capita alcohol consumption in Russia, Belarus, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria and the former Czechoslovakia. Total population and gender-specific models were estimated using auto regressive integrated moving average time-series modelling. Results: The estimates for the total population were generally positive and significant. For Russia and Belarus, a 1-litre increase in per capita consumption was associated with an increase in injury mortality of 7.5 and 5.5 per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively. The estimates for the remaining countries ranged between 1.4 and 2.0. The gender-specific estimates displayed national variations similar to the total population estimates although the estimates for males were higher than for females in all countries. Conclusions: The results suggest that changes in per capita consumption have a significant impact on injury mortality in these countries, but the strength of the association tends to be stronger in countries where intoxication-oriented drinking is more common.

  • 2009. Jonas Landberg. Journal of Suicide and Life-threatening Behaviour 38 (4), 452-459

    The aim of this paper was to estimate how suicide rates in the United States are affected by changes in per capita consumption during the postwar period. The analysis included Annual suicide rates and per capita alcohol consumption data (total and beverage specific) for the period 1950–2002. Gender- and age-specific models were estimated using the Box-Jenkins technique for time series analysis. No significant estimate was found for males. For females the total alcohol estimate (0.059) was significant at the 10% level whereas the spirits estimate was significant with an effect of 0.152. The results imply that a change in U.S. per capita consumption would result in a change in female suicide rates, whereas the male rates would not be affected.

     

  • 2008. Jonas Landberg. Drug and Alcohol Review 27 (4), 361-373

    INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: The aim of this paper was to estimate how suicide rates in seven eastern European countries are affected by changes in population drinking and to put the results into a comparative perspective. DESIGN AND METHODS: The analysis included data on annual suicide mortality rates and per capita consumption for the post-war period from: Russia, Belarus, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, the former Czechoslovakia and the former German Democratic Republic (GDR). Overall and gender-specific models were estimated using the Box-Jenkins technique for time-series analysis. The estimates were pooled into two groups, i.e. spirits countries (Russia, Belarus and Poland) and non-spirits countries (Hungary, Bulgaria, former Czechoslovakia and former GDR). RESULTS: All countries obtained positive alcohol effect estimates. The effects on the overall population were largest in the spirits countries, where a 1-litre increase in per capita consumption was associated with an increase in overall suicide rates of 5.7-7.5%. The effects were somewhat smaller in the non-spirits countries, 2.7-4.7%. The estimates for males were larger, but showed the same national variations as the overall population estimates. The female estimates were generally smaller than for men and did not differ between the two country groups. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that per capita consumption matters for suicide mortality in these eastern European countries, but that the strength of the relationship is contingent upon the drinking culture, so that it tends to be stronger in countries with detrimental drinking patterns.

  • 2008. Jonas Landberg.
  • 2007. Mats Ramstedt, Jonas Landberg.
Show all publications by Jonas Landberg at Stockholm University

Last updated: September 21, 2018

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