Profiles

Natalia Volvach

Natalia Volvach

Doktorand

Visa sidan på svenska
Works at The Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism
Telephone 08-16 33 98
Email natalia.volvach@biling.su.se
Visiting address Universitetsvägen 10 D
Room D478
Postal address Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet 106 91 Stockholm

About me

I started my post-graduate education at the Center for the Study of Language and Society at the University of Bern. In February, 2019 I was offered a PhD position at the Centre for Research on Bilingualism at the Stockholm University, where I could continue working on my PhD project. 

I completed my Bachelor degree in Translation in Kherson National Technical University, Ukraine and obtained my Master degree in German Studies and Eastern European studies at the University of Bern. In my master thesis, I focused on the discursive construction of the Crimean referendum in selected Ukrainian and Russian online newspapers. 

 

Research

In my PhD project, I study the interplay of language, ideologies, and power in Crimea. I apply ethnographic and discursive approaches to the analysis of indexical displays of language and other semiotic resources to better understand the ways the ideologization of space is constructed, perceived, and lived. Besides qualitative methods of ethnographic research such as interviews and participant observations, the public signs are explored through the lens of linguistic landscape.

 

PhD Supervisors: 

  • Christopher Stroud (Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Stockholm University)
  • Caroline Kerfoot (Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Stockholm University) 

 

Significance of the PhD project 

New lines of conflict in Eastern Europe have shown that countries of the former Soviet Union need closer scientific discussion. This dissertation addresses these needs and intends to increase the understanding of socio-political transformations in Crimea from a sociolinguistic perspective. Put in a broad context, the study will give new insights into the semiotic changes of post-Soviet landscapes that include re-writing of space.

 

Last updated: September 5, 2019

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