Profiles

Iann Lundegård

Iann Lundegård

Docent

Visa sidan på svenska
Works at Department of Mathematics and Science Education
Telephone 08-120 766 21
Email iann.lundegard@mnd.su.se
Visiting address Svante Arrheniusväg 20 A, E-huset, Arrheniuslab
Room E 371
Postal address Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik 106 91 Stockholm

About me

Associate professor in science education.
Director of the Graduate School NaNo

Research

My particular interest is in education in the intersection between nature and society. These are areas in science education addressing critical complex social problems associated with uncertainty, including risk assessment and personal positions. This is important for students when dealing with problems in their daily lives, but also to be able to take political decisions as citizens concerning lifestyles and sustainable development. In my research, I have closely looked at the role of values ​​and conflicts in students deliberations, and the role of education in their identity development ethically and politically. Another branch of interest is of a more theoretical nature. I am interested in pragmatic philosophy, to develop didactic research contributing to the frame of methodology. 
I have a former background as a teacher at elementary school as well as in high school. 

Publications

A selection from Stockholm University publication database
  • 2014. Iann Lundegård, Karim M. Hamza. Science Education 98 (1), 127-142

    This article addresses the problem of treating generalizations of human activity as entities and structures that ultimately explain the activities from which they were initially drawn. This is problematic because it involves a circular reasoning leading to unwarranted claims explaining the originally studied activities of science teaching and learning. Unlike other fields within social science research, this problem has not been appreciated and discussed in the science education literature and the field thus needs to be reminded of it. A heuristic specifically developed for the purposes of this article is applied to two examples taken from a much-cited research in the field. Through the examples it is argued that the practice of creating entities out of generalizations of science classroom activities leads to a number of unintended consequences. It is further argued that the stated purposes in the two example articleswould actually have been better served by investigating the entire processes through which the activities develop, as well as how the activities may change through teaching. The article concludes that through the search for explanations caused by underlying entities, science education research runs a risk of alienating its results from the activities from which it initially wanted to meliorate.

  • 2012. Iann Lundegård, Per-Olof Wickman. Environmental Education Research 18 (2), 153-169

    A great deal of the ongoing discussion about environmental education and edu- cation for sustainable development has to do with democracy and deliberation. Here, for example, the normative approach has been challenged. As an alterna- tive, there is sometimes a call for a curriculum and education that is character- ized by democracy, participation, and pluralism. According to this call, it is still far from clear what it actually means to create education in terms of democracy. While the debate is lively, it is not always anchored in empirical research. In this study, three students in a classroom situation talk about resources and soli- darity. Using analytical tools developed from a pragmatic base, the study tries to find a methodology to reveal how people create political subjects while engaged in such a discourse. This is associated with the discussion about democracy in education, and the consequences these findings may have in respect of how edu- cation on environment and sustainable development can be staged in terms of freedom and pluralism. 

  • 2015. Iann Lundegård. Cultural Studies in Science Education
Show all publications by Iann Lundegård at Stockholm University

Last updated: October 26, 2017

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