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Rosa Weber

PhD Student

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Works at Department of Sociology
Telephone 08-16 11 43
Email rosa.weber@sociology.su.se
Visiting address Universitetsvägen 10 B, plan 9
Room B 960
Postal address Sociologiska institutionen 106 91 Stockholm

About me

Rosa Weber is a PhD student in Sociology. Her research focuses on migration outcomes in the Nordic context and the Mexico-U.S. setting. Specifically, she studies circular migration in a setting of free mobility between Finland and Sweden, immigrants' labour market assimilation in Sweden, and the increasingly militarized border between Mexico and U.S. and its impact on undocumented migrants' remittances and educational achievement in the second generation. In order to study these two contexts she analyzes a number of different data sets: linked Finnish and Swedish register data, Swedish and U.S. survey data as well as administrative data from the U.S. In connection with her research on the U.S. context, she did a research stay at Princeton University last year. She is a member of Register-based Research in Nordic Demography and the Stockholm University SIMSAM Node for Demographic Research, as well as, the SIMSAM graduate school (SINGS). She is also a member of Stockholm University Linnaeus Center on Social Policy and family Dynamics in Europe (SPaDE), Tackling Inequalities in Time of Economic Austerity (TITA) and the Migrant Trajectories project. 

Teaching

Rosa Weber has held seminars and exercises for the courses "Quantitative Sociology", "Basic Sociology", "Ethnicity and Migration" and "Introduction to Quantitative Data Management and Statistics" at the Department.

Research

Rosa's research focuses on migration in the Nordic countries and between Mexico and US. She continues her collaboration with Jan Saarela (Abo Akademi, Finland) in their project using linked Finnish and Swedish register data to study circular migration between the two countries. She is also working on a single authored paper studying the relationship between immigrants' social contacts and labour market assimilation in Sweden. Additionally, in Princeton she has started a collaboration with Doulgas Massey (Princeton University) to write a paper titled "Increased border enforcement and deportations: Assessing Effects on Remittance Flows to Mexico from migrants in the United States”​.

Publications

A selection from Stockholm University publication database
  • 2017. Jan Saarela, Rosa Weber. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 45, 20-24

    Aim: In population registers, information on completed schooling is either missing or misclassified for a large proportion of newly arrived immigrants. It is unclear how quickly the information is updated and whether misclassification, i.e., that the wrong level of education is recorded, biases empirical estimates. Methods: We use unique linked Swedish and Finnish register data to determine the extent of such mismeasurement. By running logistic regressions on zero earnings, we also illustrate how mismeasurement might influence the estimated effects of education on health or labour market outcomes. Results: We find a considerable bias in estimates based on Swedish records of educational attainment during immigrants' first few years in the country. Misclassification is additionally very common, even when information on educational attainment exists. Conclusions: These findings suggest that research and policies using recently arrived immigrants' completed schooling as a determinant of socioeconomic integration need to be interpreted with care.

Show all publications by Rosa Weber at Stockholm University

Last updated: March 25, 2019

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