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Rosa Weber

Researcher

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Works at Department of Sociology
Email rosa.weber@sociology.su.se
Visiting address Universitetsvägen 10 B, plan 9
Room B820
Postal address Sociologiska institutionen 106 91 Stockholm

About me

I am a post doctoral researcher at the Department of Sociology at Stockholm University. My research interests include temporary migration, integration, social capital, and immigration enforcement. I am specialized in quantitative methods and have experience working both with register and survey data. My PhD thesis examined how policy impacts migration and integration in the Nordic and Mexico-U.S. settings. It was defended in January 2020 and funded by the Department of Sociology. In connection with my research on the U.S. context, I did a research stay at Princeton University in 2017/18. I hold a master's degree in Sociology from the London School of Economics and have a background in humanities from University College London.

Teaching

I am teaching in the undergraduate course Mesosociology at the Department of Sociology at Stockholm University. I also supervise undergraduate theses in Sociology and Demography.

I have previously held seminars and exercises for the courses Ethnicity and Migration, Basic Sociology, Introduction to Quantitative Data Management and Statistics, and  Quantitative Sociology at the Department.

Research

My postdoctoral research is situated within two interdisciplinary research programs:

  • Migrant trajectories: Geographical Mobility, Family Careers, Employment, Education, and Social Insurance in Sweden, 1990–2016 (Funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE); 2016-2022). My research explores integration among first and second-generation migrants, with a focus on Finnish migrants, in Sweden.
  • Demographic change and ethnolinguistic identity in an intergenerational perspective: The Swedish-speaking population in Finland (Funded by Åbo Akademi University's Centre for Excellence Unit; 2019-) My focus lies on international migration to and from Finland and migrant integration.

In my PhD thesis, Borders and Barriers, I examined the links between migration and integration patterns and migrants' ties to the home and destination country. I focused on two ultimately distinct settings when it comes to the borders and barriers that migrants face: the Nordic and Mexico-U.S. settings. Until recently, Swedish migration policy was among the most welcoming to migrants from different parts of the world. Migration within the Nordic countries, in particular, is characterized by open borders. By contrast, Mexico and the U.S. are separated by an increasingly militarized border and internal policing of migrants has risen dramatically. Consequently, these two settings provide contrasting and interesting examples of the relationship between the policy context and migrants' experiences.

Publications

A selection from Stockholm University publication database
  • Thesis (Doc) Borders and Barriers
    2020. Rosa Weber (et al.).

    International migration engages large numbers of people. Men, women and children break up from their homes and move to another country temporarily or permanently. Depending on the country of origin and the destination, this comes with varying degrees of uncertainties about where to settle, how much to invest in building a new life abroad and how to retain ties to the country of origin. In recent years, policies have become increasingly salient for migrants’ experiences. They impact entry possibilities and the ease of travelling back home. Increased policing of migrants can interfere in the building of a new life abroad and contribute to stress and apprehension felt among both migrants and their children. To some extent counteracting this, family and friends may provide newly arrived migrants with information on job opportunities and facilitate the transition into the new country.

    This dissertation analyses the links between migration and integration patterns and migrants’ ties to the home and destination country. It does this in two ultimately distinct settings when it comes to the borders and barriers that migrants face: the Nordic and Mexico-U.S. settings. Until recently, Swedish migration policy was among the most welcoming to migrants from different parts of the world. Migration within the Nordic countries, in particular, is characterised by open borders. By contrast, Mexico and the U.S. are separated by an increasingly militarised border and internal policing of migrants has risen dramatically. Consequently, these settings provide contrasting and interesting examples of the relationship between the policy context and migrants’ experiences.

    Study 1 shows that many moves are temporary and short term in the Nordic setting of free mobility. Still, the threshold to the first move is notably higher than for subsequent moves. Study 2 reveals that rising deportations of Mexican migrants in the U.S. are associated with a shift from savings brought home to the sending of remittances. Afraid of a sudden arrest or deportation, migrants maintain transnational ties by sending remittances back to Mexico rather than carrying savings across the border. Study 3 investigates the different roles that social contacts play for male and female migrants’ integration into the Swedish labour market. Whereas friends provide men with benefits in the labour market, women’s job search is often constrained by factors linked to having family in Sweden. Study 4 shows that the implementation of local level immigration enforcement in the U.S. has a negative impact on district level average educational achievement among Hispanic students. This indicates that integration and resulting ethnic achievement gaps are shaped by increased policing and surveillance of migrants.

    This dissertation reveals a series of complex relationships between migration, integration and policies. Family and kin influence migration decisions also when barriers to movement are low. In the new country, kin can assist migrants’ job search or slow it down when newly arrived migrants are expected to care for them. Policing of migrants makes it more difficult to return and may affect migrants’ abilities to invest in building a new life, as indicated by negative effects for educational outcomes among groups targeted by immigration enforcement. Taken together, these factors shape the experiences and life chances of both migrants and their children in the new country.

  • 2019. Rosa Weber, Jan Saarela. Population, Space and Place 25 (4)

    Circular migration in settings of free mobility has received increasing policy attention. However, due to data constraints, little is known about the mechanisms underlying it. Using linked Finnish and Swedish register data that allow us to follow Finnish migrants across national borders, we analyse whether the determinants of circular migration differ from those of the first and return move. People move freely between Sweden and Finland, as they are in the common Nordic labour market. Event history analysis shows that many moves are temporary and short term. Moreover, the patterns of circular migration reflect those of the first emigration and first return, respectively. Swedish speakers and individuals who are not married are more prone to emigrate for the first and second time, whereas Finnish speakers and married individuals have a higher risk of return migration. This implies that circular migration may amplify demographic features related to emigration and return migration.

  • 2017. Jan Saarela, Rosa Weber. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 45, 20-24

    Aim: In population registers, information on completed schooling is either missing or misclassified for a large proportion of newly arrived immigrants. It is unclear how quickly the information is updated and whether misclassification, i.e., that the wrong level of education is recorded, biases empirical estimates. Methods: We use unique linked Swedish and Finnish register data to determine the extent of such mismeasurement. By running logistic regressions on zero earnings, we also illustrate how mismeasurement might influence the estimated effects of education on health or labour market outcomes. Results: We find a considerable bias in estimates based on Swedish records of educational attainment during immigrants' first few years in the country. Misclassification is additionally very common, even when information on educational attainment exists. Conclusions: These findings suggest that research and policies using recently arrived immigrants' completed schooling as a determinant of socioeconomic integration need to be interpreted with care.

Show all publications by Rosa Weber at Stockholm University

Last updated: May 3, 2021

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