Profiles

Kicki Skog

Kicki Skog

Universitetslektor

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Arbetar vid Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik
Telefon 08-120 764 01
E-post kicki.skog@mnd.su.se
Besöksadress Svante Arrheniusväg 20 A, E-huset, Arrheniuslab
Rum P 407
Postadress Institutionen för matematikämnets och naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik 106 91 Stockholm

Forskning

Min forskningsprofil i matematikämnets didaktik handlar om möjlighet till lärande i matematik och hur detta kan ta sig uttryck i olika kulturer, såväl nationellt som internationellt.

I mitt avhandlingsprojekt studerade jag möjligheter och utmaningar som blivande matematiklärare möter och hanterar under lärarutbildningen. Det var en longitudinell och etnografisk studie som utifrån ett sociopolitiskt perspektiv satte ljus på rådande diskurser om lärande och undervisning i matematik och hur studenterna utmanar eller accepterar dessa av olika orsaker.

För närvarande arbetar jag med ett projekt om matematiklärares lärande tillsammans med kollegor i Sverige, Sydafrika, Rwanda och Grekland. Här finns möjligheter att studera utmaningar som nyutexaminerade matematiklärare står inför oavsett kulturell kontext och hur politiska och socioekonomiska förhållanden ser ut, men också hur dessa förhållanden gör skillnad för matematiklärares utveckling.

1. Peer-reviewed original articles
Skog, K., & Andersson, A. (2015). Exploring positioning as an analytical tool for understanding becoming mathematics teachers’ identities. Mathematics Education Research Journal. 27(1), pp. 65-82

2. Peer-reviewed conference contributions
Skog, K., & Andersson, A. (2013b). Immigrant mathematics teacher students’ subject positioning. In A. M. Lindmeier, & A. Heinze, (Eds.). Proceedings of the 37th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, 4, (pp. 233-240). Kiel, Germany: PME.

Skog, K., & Andersson, A. (2013a). Exploring identity positioning as an analytical tool. in M. Berger, K. K. Brodie, V. Frith, & K. le Roux (Eds.), Proceedings of the 7th International Mathematics Education and Society Conference (pp. 441-451). Capetown: Hansa Print Ltd.

Skog, K. (2012). Beginning prospective mathematics teachers' identity construction viewed as positioning of self. in G. Gunnarsdóttir, E. Jablonka, A. Ryve, & G. Pálsdóttir (Eds.), Proceedings of NORMA 11. The sixth Nordic conference on mathematics education (pp. 587-596). University of Iceland Press.

3. Monographs
Skog, K. (2014). Power, positionings and mathematics. Discursive practices in mathematics teacher education. (Doctoral dissertation) Stockholm: Stockholm University.

Publikationer

I urval från Stockholms universitets publikationsdatabas
  • 2019. Iben Maj Christiansen, Lisa Österling, Kicki Skog. Research Papers in Education

    ‘Good teaching’ remains disputed, but few studies have empirically studied variations in views of good teaching as reflected in teacher education. This study performed a content analysis of criteria for student teacher lesson observations stated in protocols from universities in six countries. Similarities across the protocols were the absence of images of the charismatic and the technical-professional teacher, and the dearth of teleological aspects. The degree to which protocols reflected a knowledge base, had clear implementation requirements, valued reasoned judgement, and valued transformation of content varied. On the basis of this range of images of the desired teacher, we suggest four categories of teacher images: the knowledgeable teacher, the knowledge-transforming teacher, the efficient teacher, and the constantly improving teacher, and further discuss the possibility of an inspired teacher.

  • 2018. Kicki Skog, Iben Maj Christiansen, Lisa Österling. Proceedings of the 42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, 211-212

    Teacher education generally has both a contextual component of observing and teaching in schools, and decontextualized elements in university courses (cf. Tatto et al., 2012). University courses may be content courses, general pedagogical courses, or mathematics education courses. The assessment criteria of each component or course transmit, both explicitly and implicitly, notions of the desired teacher. Our key concept is the desired teacher. This recognises the teacher as both a subject and as subjected to discourses of power which constitute categories such as ‘teacher’ and ‘good teacher’ (cf. Montecino & Valero, 2015). Notions or images of the desired teacher produce ‘regimes of truth’ which normalise reflection - or not, normalise transformation of content as part of teaching - or not, etc. The notion of what the good teacher is, has varied over time and place. Images of the charismatic teacher with the disposition to teach, have been around for a long time, and still prevail in popular culture (Connell, 2009). Connell also identified a technical-professional model, which prevails in descriptions of teachers’ “technical know-how”. But what are current, competing, contrasting or co-existing images of the desired teacher? This gives rise to this question guiding the work in the group: What are the images of the desired teacher reflected in references to desired knowledge and valued application practices, in institutional materials etc.?

  • 2018. Jalal Nouri, Eva Norén, Kicki Skog. INTED2018, 7983-7989

    The interest in programming education has been significantly strengthened recently, as a consequence of an increasingly digital world that demands development of digital skills. More and more countries have introduced programming in their K-9 curricula. In 2017, Sweden joined these countries through the government's decision to make changes to the curriculum in terms of introducing programming in compulsory school. However, the path to successful programming education is associated with a number of challenges, of which the most crucial - on an international level - is related to lack of didactical research that sheds light on good teaching practices. In this study, we reached out to 19 teachers that by now considered themselves experienced in teaching programming for young children in K-9 and conducted interviews with them. A large majority of these teachers, fifteen of them, participated in a national research project with focus on programming education. The remaining four teachers were identified in specialized social media groups with focus on programming education.In the paper, we report on an analysis of the 19 interviews conducted with K-9 teachers that have experience in teaching programming asking the question: what didactical strategies are employed by experienced teachers when teaching programming in K-9? As such, the paper reports on a number of strategies employed by teachers and contributes to our understanding of how programming education are enacted by experienced K-9 teachers.

  • 2018. Jalal Nouri, Eva Norén, Kicki Skog. INTED 2018, 7990-7995

    For some years now many Swedish teachers in K-9 education have explored programming with their pupils supported by a number of national and global initiatives, despite not having any formal education in programming or for teaching programming. However, with the advent of programming languages such as Scratch and various online resources tailored to younger learners, teachers have some extent been supported to teach programming. In this study, we reached out to 19 teachers that by now considered themselves experienced in teaching programming for young children in K-9 and conducted interviews with them. A large majority of these teachers, fifteen of them, participated in a national research project with focus on programming education. The remaining four teachers were identified in specialized social media groups with focus on programming education. When doing the interviews with the teachers we soon found that games play a big role when teaching and learning programming in K-9 education. This entails both playing games in order to learn programming concepts using game developed for this purpose, and coding games in order to learn programming concepts. In this paper, we report on this two approaches of relating to games in programming education in K-9 and present the advantages teachers emphasize with these approaches in terms of how they are received by pupils and what the bring to school.

  • 2015. Kicki Skog, Annica Andersson. Mathematics Education Research Journal 27 (1), 65-82

    The aim of this article is to explore how a sociopolitical analysis can contribute to a deeper understanding of critical aspects for becoming primary mathematics teachers' identities during teacher education. The question we ask is the following: How may power relations in university settings affect becoming mathematics teachers' subject positioning? We elaborate on the elusive and interrelated concepts of identity, positioning and power, seen as dynamic and changeable. As these concepts represent three interconnected parts of research analysis in an on-going larger project data from different sources will be used in this illustration. In this paper, we clarify the theoretical stance, ground the concepts historically and strive to connect them to research analysis. In this way, we show that power relations and subject positioning in social settings are critical aspects and need to be taken seriously into account if we aim at understanding becoming teachers' identities.

  • 2014. Kicki Skog (et al.).

    This is an ethnographic study from within mathematics teacher education in Sweden. A methodological insider approach enabled to view teacher education from the students’ perspectives, by focusing how discursive power-relations affected what becoming mathematics teachers brought forward as concerning during two years of education. I took a socio-political theoretical perspective and understood discourse, power and positioning as dynamically interrelated concepts, which allowed the analysis to foreground several aspects simultaneously and to illustrate elusive phenomena as they occurred and disappeared.

    The results show that the mathematics education and mathematics discourses are open and multifaceted and reveal empowered positionings, whereas the language/culture and institutional discourses both are narrower and more constraining. These constraints, in turn, affect students’ possibilities to enact empowered positionings within the more open discourses. The core of education, that is mathematics and mathematics education, may therefore be obscured by discourses of “truths”.

    The study shows a need for further research on how to strengthen students’ possibilities to influence their education, and to ask questions like why education is organised this way, and who benefits from that.

  • 2013. Kicki Skog, Annica Andersson. Proceedings of the seventh international mathematics education and society conference, vols 1 and 2, 441-451

    The aim of this paper is to explore how a socio-political analysis can contribute to a deeper understanding of critical aspects for prospective primary mathematics teachers' identity construction during teacher training. The question we ask is: How may power relations in university settings affect prospective mathematics teachers' identity positioning? We elaborate on the elusive concepts of identity, positioning and power relations, seen as dynamic and changeable, as these represent three interconnected parts of research analysis in an ongoing larger project. In this paper we clarify the theoretical stance, ground the concepts historically and strive to connect them to research analysis. In this way we show that power relations and subject positioning in social settings are critical aspects and need to be taken into account if we aim at understanding prospective teachers' identities.

Visa alla publikationer av Kicki Skog vid Stockholms universitet

Senast uppdaterad: 20 april 2020

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